Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

New to water cooling. Need some advice.

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
February 20, 2012 11:52:53 PM

Hey guys. I'm new to TH. I've posted before in the New Builds section for some advice. Now I need some help on WC.

Will a 360 rad with push/pull config be enough to cool a 3960X slightly OC'ed and a GTX 580 3 GB?

It will be in the NZXT Switch 810

If so, is this a good drawing of the setup?
Also, I want my res to be outside.
I plan to mount this res outside my case.
Is this a good res?



If not, can someone recommend a good setup.
A quiet one under minimal load (Watching movies, browsing, streaming music/videos)
It doesn't matter on a higher load as I will have a headset on.

And this is just an idea I had. Would it be possible to create a reservoir in the shape of a triforce?

The connectors between the triangles will most likely be solid.



Thanks for all your help.

More about : water cooling advice

February 21, 2012 1:07:09 AM

As far as you qustion about a 360 being enough for your cpu and gpu, the short answer is yes. Is it the most effect way? Not really. Think of it like this, If you have your Cpu being cooled and the warmer water being carried off to your gpu, the liquid is already going to be in a warm state, so the effectiveness of your cooler would not be ideal. It will still work, but a better option would be to keep your 360 rad (or even a 240) and get a second 180 rad. Something to the notion of Pump > CPU > 360 Rad > GPU > 180 rad > back to res/pump. That is the more efficient way, but more $$$. Im still relatively new to WC, but that is what I would do. As far as your resevoir question, I prefer internal stuff, looks less tacky, so I am not sure about mounting on the exteroir. Hope this at all helped Godd Luck!
m
0
l
a c 324 K Overclocking
February 21, 2012 1:27:00 AM

Loop order does not matter when it comes to temps.

I'm not sure I follow your triangle drawing...I don't understand what you are trying to do there.
m
0
l
Related resources
February 21, 2012 1:37:34 AM

Another question.
When checking for air bubbles, how would I know if there were any if my tubing is not a clear color?

@aviconus
Thanks. I'll look into that. How bout a 140 rad at the bottom instead of the 180?

@rubix_1011
So do you think a 360 will be good enough? Or would you also recommend two rads?

For the triforce res

The water would go from the rad to the top triangle.
Then it would fall into both of the bottom ones.
Then those two would combine and fall to the pump and go through everything it needs to go through before going through the rad back into the top triangle.
Also, it would be mounted on the windowless side of a case.
m
0
l
February 21, 2012 1:38:52 AM

In the triforce pic
The gray is the solid part.
Black is tubing
m
0
l
February 21, 2012 1:51:36 AM

I dont see why a 140 would not work. Think of a rad as 'Time' The bigger the Rad, the more time there is to dissipate heat. Larger Rads have longer to dissipate heat, while the smaller ones, do not have the same amount of time to dissipate that heat, thereby not cooling as much. The difference is minimal though.
m
0
l
a c 324 K Overclocking
February 21, 2012 2:06:06 AM

I still don't understand...that pic doesn't depict an actual loop...it only goes one direction. And are you making it? Is it an 'open' res instead of closed like all?

I've built a handful of my own res's and I'm still not following what you are wanting to do.
m
0
l
February 21, 2012 2:29:35 AM

The three triangles would be the 3 reservoirs all connected together.
The yellow color is the color of the liquid.
The black is the tubing.
The gray is some type of hard plastic or metal.

I think this pic will help.


m
0
l
a c 324 K Overclocking
February 21, 2012 12:33:25 PM

Why do you need/want reservoirs like that? From personal experience, when building reservoirs, the more complicated, the more you are asking for problems.

Also, you didn't respond to my questions above:

Quote:
Is it an 'open' res instead of closed like all?
m
0
l
February 21, 2012 1:31:34 PM

Just for show. It's a symbol from a very popular game series.

It would be closed. Probably 3 plastic/acrylic triangles.
I'm not sure what reservoirs are made of.

And if I ever wanted something like that, how would I go about making that?
I don't have a garage or some kind of work area. =(
Should I buy like rectangular pieces and cut them into triangles and then maybe melt the edges together? and drill holes for the tubing?
Never done stuff like this before.

Also my question earlier.
When checking for air bubbles, how would I know if there were any if my tubing is not a clear color?
m
0
l
a c 324 K Overclocking
February 21, 2012 1:41:00 PM

I know what the Triforce is/was...I played plenty of the first Legend of Zelda when I was a kid.

I'll be honest- that's a pretty ambitious reservoir layout and likely to be very difficult to build. You'll want to use acrylic, but you have to get the right kind...cuts need to be precision accurate and flat as well as having to cut precision holes where you need fittings/tubing to be mounted without cracking the acrylic. All this needs to be done prior, so you can glue them using a fusion/welding cement.

If you do it, good luck and post pics.

If you are using colored tubing, you can usually tell if you have air when it sounds like your pump is churning and making noises like it's a bubble blender- which is essentially what it is. A pump should be almost silent except for a steady hum when it's running. However, you still need to ensure that you don't have air in your rads, so you'll want to give these a few rotations to get the air out.
m
0
l
February 21, 2012 1:59:41 PM

Wow. That sounds a bit tough.
I think I'm gonna stick with a regular setup for now.
But at some point I might do that and will definitely post pics.

That's good to hear about bleeding air.So after it settles down, just tilt the case around a bit and make sure?
m
0
l
a c 324 K Overclocking
February 21, 2012 2:10:39 PM

You'd want to do the moving and shaking once you get the loop mostly filled and running while the PSU is jumpered and the system isn't technically 'on'.

Maybe I need to find or make a video to link in the sticky that walks people through this set of steps.
m
0
l
!