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How do I connect the power button to my mobo?

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October 25, 2009 3:30:03 PM

I'm in the process of building my first desktop. I have almost everything put together, but I don't know what to do about the power button. I am reusing an old case from my broken Gateway desktop that I got back in 2002. The power button on that is a 15 pin connection (not the big square pins like with the power supply, but 15 very small ones). It's a black connector and there are a few wires twisted together that are part of it. On my old mobo, there were 15 pins sticking out (which is where you were supposed to connect it0. There doesn't seem to be anything like that on my new mobo. How will I be able to connect the power button? If it turns out that I cannot connect the power button (since it's incompatible) how will I be able to power up my desktop? There is an on/off switch on the back of my power supply. If the power button doesn't work, will I be able to use that to turn on my desktop?
a c 90 B Homebuilt system
October 25, 2009 4:25:06 PM

mikekazik1 said:
There doesn't seem to be anything like that on my new mobo.
They're there on the motherboard.
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a c 90 B Homebuilt system
October 25, 2009 4:27:02 PM

Do we need to guess what motherboard you're using?
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a c 90 B Homebuilt system
October 25, 2009 4:41:59 PM

Right edge at the top in this picture:


You'll need to break out the MB manual and the manual for the case to figure out which wire goes where.
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a b B Homebuilt system
October 25, 2009 4:47:09 PM

Re-using a case, especially a proprietary on is generally going to lead to problems like this as they are customized for rapid assembly by lightly trained personnel. Asus uses something like the 15 pin thing you describe called the Q Connector. It allows you to place paired pins on the Q connector one at a time outside your case in nice bright light and then you can connect the whole shebang in the dark, hard to reach area in one shot. Problem is, the arrangement of these pins is manufacturer specific.

So, unless you can slide off the pin pairs off that thing individually you are outta luck. Only other option is to cut off the 15 pin connector and solder then pins onto the connectors individually. I wouldn't know where to find the twin pin connectors. Though I have done alot of sleeving, soldering and such with 3 pin connectors....never had opportunity to to the 2 pin jobs.
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October 25, 2009 5:10:13 PM

WR2 said:
Right edge at the top in this picture:
http://i38.tinypic.com/2wlzej6.jpg

You'll need to break out the MB manual and the manual for the case to figure out which wire goes where.


Are you talking about the black outlet? I already tried to insert it into that but it won't fit. The connector would have been a 16 pin connection, but one of the squares is closed off.
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October 25, 2009 5:13:13 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
Re-using a case, especially a proprietary on is generally going to lead to problems like this as they are customized for rapid assembly by lightly trained personnel. Asus uses something like the 15 pin thing you describe called the Q Connector. It allows you to place paired pins on the Q connector one at a time outside your case in nice bright light and then you can connect the whole shebang in the dark, hard to reach area in one shot. Problem is, the arrangement of these pins is manufacturer specific.

So, unless you can slide off the pin pairs off that thing individually you are outta luck. Only other option is to cut off the 15 pin connector and solder then pins onto the connectors individually. I wouldn't know where to find the twin pin connectors. Though I have done alot of sleeving, soldering and such with 3 pin connectors....never had opportunity to to the 2 pin jobs.


I did a google search on the Q connector. It looks nothing like that. Mine is completely different. I'll try to take a pic of it.

Here's the pic:

http://img260.imageshack.us/i/pict0034e.jpg/
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October 25, 2009 6:07:50 PM

I think JackNaylorPE has it nailed. I really don't think he was suggesting that you had a Q connector, he was suggesting that your connector is proprietory to Gateway just as the Q connector is for Asus. Point being that it would only be usable on another Gateway mobo, more than likely from the time frame your original Gateway mobo/case was made. I think you are either going to have to:
1. Get a little adventurous as JackNaylorPE suggests
2. Get another power switch that would fit your front panel (good luck)
3. Get a new case.

If you can afford it I would go with a new case. I am betting there are other front panel connections in that one connector also that you are going to have the same problem with such as your reset, case speaker, etc.

(edited for clarity)
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October 25, 2009 6:21:11 PM

Supe_ said:
I think JackNaylorPE has it nailed. I really don't think he was suggesting that you had a Q connector, he was suggesting that your connector is proprietory to Gateway just as the Q connector is for Asus. Point being that it would only be usable on another Gateway mobo, more than likely from the time frame your original Gateway mobo/case was made. I think you are either going to have to:
1. Get a little adventurous as JackNaylorPE suggests
2. Get another power switch that would fit your front panel (good luck)
3. Get a new case.

If you can afford it I would go with a new case. I am betting there are other front panel connections in that one connector also that you are going to have the same problem with such as your reset, case speaker, etc.

(edited for clarity)


I chose the first option and I was successful. It turns out that all I had to do was punch a whole into the sealed connector (which had nothing in it anyway). Now, my desktop starts up beautifully.
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a c 90 B Homebuilt system
October 25, 2009 6:29:06 PM

How does everything else on the front panel work?
HDD activity light? Reset Switch? Case speaker?
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October 25, 2009 6:32:14 PM

I still have to work on the activity light, but that could probably be done by splitting the connector. I'll figure the rest out later on.
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!