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This is my first post. Plz help in building the right pc.

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January 12, 2010 2:49:15 AM

Hi All,

This is my first post. Need guidance from you.

I am planning to buy a pc by end of this week. Plz guide me in building the right pc

The purpose of buying this pc

1. For heavy applications like 3d ( maya ) and 2d ( photoshop ) and other heavy works like video editing etc.
2. I never play games ( never ).


Are these specs ok.

1. Intel core i7 - 920 @ 2.67 Ghz
2. Asus P6T V2 or Gigabyte UD5 or Gigabyte UD3R or Intel Dx58so or MSI x58 Pro - E
3. Transcend DDR3 Ram 2gb x 3 = GB
( can't afford to buy corsair or ocz)
4. Samsung 1 TB Hard disk.
5. 22'' inch Samsung TFT
6. Cooler Master 600 W
7. Zebronics Bijli CPU Cabinet



Will any of these motherboard will do my job "Gigabyte UD3R or Intel Dx58so or MSI x58 Pro - E"
Do i need a good quality PSU or normal will do.
As i never play games do i need graphics card, if so which one will suffice.

Thanks in advance.





More about : post plz building

January 12, 2010 2:54:10 AM

Quote:
EVGA X58 or nothing. There warranty is unbeatable


But as i never play games, will ordinary boards like Gigabyte UD3R or intel Dx58so will not do the job
( as i can save some bucks )
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January 12, 2010 3:59:45 AM

Yes you will need a video card. I would not skimp out on a video card either.... You never know when you will need one.

BTW: You should not buy cheap ram to save money. If you cannot afford that system - you cannot afford it. Go AMD instead. i7 was not meant as a budget build.
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January 12, 2010 4:10:37 AM

kudilkrishna said:
But as i never play games, will ordinary boards like Gigabyte UD3R or intel Dx58so will not do the job
( as i can save some bucks )


The DX58SO and UD3R will do fine for the average user - both have good overclocking potential.

Gigabyte UD4P and ASUS P6T are slightly more expensive (around $240) and provide more features than the DX58SO or UD3R.

EVGA x58 have better support. ASUS and Gigabyte's motherboards tend to be more solid. All of them overclock about the same. You won't notice any speed differences either.

Get whatever is the cheapest out of this list.
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January 12, 2010 4:13:08 AM

werxen said:
Yes you will need a video card. I would not skimp out on a video card either.... You never know when you will need one.

BTW: You should not buy cheap ram to save money. If you cannot afford that system - you cannot afford it. Go AMD instead. i7 was not meant as a budget build.


There is no point in getting 2000MHz RAM - that's just overclocked 1600MHz RAM. The RAM on an x58 mobo with an i7 920 will default to 1066MHz anyways unless you change it in the BIOS setting.

There is no reason not to get cheap(er) RAM if the user wants to save money - he can shave off $50 or more, and the performance difference will be negligible.
January 12, 2010 4:27:01 AM

Bluescreendeath said:
The DX58SO and UD3R will do fine for the average user - both have good overclocking potential.

Gigabyte UD4P and ASUS P6T are slightly more expensive (around $240) and provide more features than the DX58SO or UD3R.

EVGA x58 have better support. ASUS and Gigabyte's motherboards tend to be more solid. All of them overclock about the same. You won't notice any speed differences either.

Get whatever is the cheapest out of this list.



Thanks for your reply mate. Can you just explain what more features does UD and P6T provide than the Dx58so.
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January 12, 2010 4:50:24 AM

I would say Gigabyte UD3R. As you wont game. Otherwise the UD5. Gigabyte boards are easy overclockers and have fairly stable BIOS, plus they are cheaper than their Asus counterparts. If going for Asus then Gene II Rampage would be a good choice. Also you need a good PSU. Corsair, Antec, Silverstone are some good brands. But the capacity is something which you should decide when you have finalized your rig. If you are getting a good GPU then a big PSU would be good. For future protection. Otherwise VX550W would be good enough for any card available in the market today, except maybe GTX295.
January 12, 2010 6:00:32 AM

kudilkrishna said:

1. For heavy applications like 3d ( maya ) and 2d ( photoshop ) and other heavy works like video editing etc.




if you are going to do some heavy 3d apps like maya you are going to need a very expensive vid card, not the same kind as a gaming card, something like this

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

read the first review

and to everyone else, stop telling him about overclocking or buying over priced ram, as you can tell from his post he will not be doing any any overclocking.
January 12, 2010 6:04:36 AM

Msixteen said:
if you are going to do some heavy 3d apps like maya you are going to need a very expensive vid card, not the same kind as a gaming card, something like this

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

read the first review

and to everyone else, stop telling him about overclocking or buying over priced ram, as you can tell from his post he will not be doing any any overclocking.



yes i would not overclock for the simple reason i dont know what is overclocking

will overclocking will give me higher performance while working with applications ?
January 12, 2010 6:08:18 AM

yes it would, but it could also destroy your system if not done exactly right, in your case i would not do it, you are already getting an i7 which will be fast enough for your needs, and seeing as how you are talking about cost effectiveness i don't think you would like to have to replace your processor i know i wouldn't
January 12, 2010 6:34:19 AM

Msixteen said:
yes it would, but it could also destroy your system if not done exactly right, in your case i would not do it, you are already getting an i7 which will be fast enough for your needs, and seeing as how you are talking about cost effectiveness i don't think you would like to have to replace your processor i know i wouldn't


Thanks msixteen for your warning, shall not overclock it.
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January 12, 2010 6:46:15 AM

regarding the graphics card, you'd be best looking at exactly which product versions you've got of things like video encoding and 3D modelling and checking what hardware acceleration they support.

My friend has a pretty mid-range CPU in her 3D machine as the GPU does pretty much all of the work, although I can't remember what software she uses
January 12, 2010 1:52:37 PM

Its been a long time since I did any 3D work so I can't reallly give you any specific suggestions but here are my thoughts..

I think you need a balance between GPU and CPU. The GPU needs to be able to handle the real time display of your models as you create and edit them so a cheap card giving stuttering here is not helpful, but mostly I believe the final render is done entirely on the CPU as the rendering algorithms aren't suited to the types of operations that the GPU is designed to handle, and so it is all CPU - If you are going to create long sequences then you may want to consider something a bit more workstation style such as dual quad core processors rather than the i7 to cut down your render times.

I think for 3D work and video editing the more RAM the better, and of course you will need a 64bit OS to use that RAM if you don't already have one.

But of course a workstation type build is expensive...
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March 3, 2011 6:32:40 AM

^^What in the hell is that supposed to mean?
!