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LGA1155 Heatsink (4sticks of RAM and microATX)

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February 22, 2012 12:57:49 PM

MAXIMUS IV GENE-Z/GEN3 (it is a microATX)
4 sticks of DDR3 RAM - Vengeance (not low profile)

Gonna get an i7-2600k and going to overclock no more than 4.3GHz.
I want a heatsink that WILL FIT and will keep my CPU at a decent temperature.

The case will have a enough space on the side.
I'm not interested in changing other components, I just need a heatsink that will go with these.

Thanks.
a b K Overclocking
February 22, 2012 1:18:23 PM

Well, I'm interested in changing your components in the interest of saving you $100. If this is a gaming build, there's no reason to go above the 2500K, which is basically the same in gaming situations.

Would you be averse to clipping off the sink on the closest RAM stick? :D  Those stupid metal things don't do anything.
February 22, 2012 1:18:38 PM

Well something to consider is the height of the heatsink. If you are using a minitower it may be an issue. Not an issue if you use a closed loop water cooler such as the Corsair Hydro series or Antex Khuler. So please let us know what case you have.
Related resources
February 22, 2012 1:22:47 PM

@jrazor247 I don't have a case yet. I can get a 500r for a fair price where I am. And that is probably what I'm going to do.
@kajabla I didn't say this is for gaming actually. (games should run smooth too)
February 22, 2012 1:30:20 PM

The 500R is a nice case. Just looked it up. That should fit just about anything. Might as well get a Corsair water cooler to keep things cool when overclocking.
a c 183 K Overclocking
February 22, 2012 2:31:38 PM

Thanks for the reference kajabla but that particular OP shunned me :( 
I think in this particular case the OP should go with a TS120.=L133 x W52 x H160 mm
It's the replacement for the MUX-120 which i have.: L133 x W58 x H160 mm
I'll guarantee it won't interfere with your ram.
I have 4 dimms of Dominators(same height as Vengeance) and the MUX fits like a glove.
The TS is slimmer and Thermalright fans are really quiet.
http://www.amazon.com/Thermalright-100700529-True-Spiri...
February 22, 2012 3:07:35 PM

@davcon True Spirit seems pretty cheap. Does it really provide good temperatures and decent noise on a 4.3GHz overclock? By the way it looks, I'm pretty sure it fits. The 212 EVO seemed better to me than this one.
February 22, 2012 3:56:55 PM

Okay, so the TS120 should be okay.
Can you give me a recommendation on what overclock settings should I use?
As I said before, I want it stable at 4.3GHz - what voltage should that be on this configuration, does the ram need any special settings?

I'm probably getting a HX650, I think that should be good for OC.
a c 183 K Overclocking
February 22, 2012 4:30:52 PM

You might get to 4.3 at stock voltage 1.3v for sure.
Don't know what ram kit you have.
February 22, 2012 4:36:33 PM

You didn't say anything about the PSU. I think you meant that the PSU is 'good to go' aswell.
February 22, 2012 4:47:02 PM

For a 2600k, you really should not need to touch any "settings" or voltages other than the multiplier. Simply increase the CPU clock ratio, or multiplier, to 43 in order to achieve ~ 4.3 GHz. If you are having any stability issues, there are a number of guides to help you work through them. In all honesty though, 4.3 is a very modest overclock for the 2600k and you shouldn't have any issues with stability or need to run at a very high voltage.

When you make the adjustment to your multiplier, the BIOS will automatically adjust your voltage based on your CPU's VID. Once you've established that your overclock is stable, which it should be rock solid, go in and set your RAM timings and voltage as instructed by the manufacturer. After you've got that, you're good to go.

Some good tools to use are:

CPU-Z @ http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html
Real Temp @ http://www.techpowerup.com/realtemp/
Prime95 @ http://files.extremeoverclocking.com/file.php?f=103

Essentially what you'll want to do is fire up CPU-Z to ensure your settings are proper for your overclock. After you've confirmed that, open Real Temp and Prime95, or other "torture test", and monitor your temperatures as Prime95 loads up your system. You'll want to let it run for a little while, the actual amount of time varies, depending on who you talk to, but if you're stable (No blue screens or errors in prime95) after an hour or two, its safe to say you've got a good overclock. Some people say you need a 24-hour "burn" to fully test the system, again this is subjective.

As far as temperatures go, since you seem to have decided on an air cooler, you'll want to stick around the 60°C mark if possible during your "burn." You can do this either by tinkering with the voltage or adding fans, if you're running hot. This is not to say that you cannot run at higher temperatures, the 2600k is certainly capable of performing at much higher temps. Simply put, when it comes to most electronics, the cooler it runs, the more efficient it will be and the longer it lasts.... I'm sure you know this.

In the end, I think 4.3 GHz is a very solid number to go with for air cooling. You'll increase the reliability of your CPU over more extreme OC's and should have no issues what-so-ever in regards to temperatures and BIOS settings. My suggestion is to read as much as possible in regards to overclocking before you adjust any voltages or settings.

In regards to your PSU, I am using a Corsair HX850 on a 2500k (@ 4.3 GHz) system with a pair of GTX570s in SLI, 16GB of DDR1600, an SSD, two standard HDD's, an optical and several USB devices. The PSU runs absolutely great and I highly recommend Corsair's power supplies. Use the following site to tally up how much power you'll need (This is a general tool and obviously not exact, but still accurate):

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

Good luck to you!
February 22, 2012 5:10:31 PM

That is a ton of information, Ironwilly. Thanks for writing this.
The PSU calculator doesn't work at the moment. I will try again later.
February 22, 2012 5:24:37 PM

I was about to link the same calc on another site, but that is just as down.
I have the 212 evo and with my board, the fan and the first RAM-block would be pushing each other slightly with tall RAM, which is definitively not ideal.

If you tell us what (if any) graphics card you will be using we can probably give a good guess at what powersupply you might need.
February 22, 2012 5:31:22 PM

I'm going to use a GTX560Ti with 2 fans, w/o overclock, 1GB. I'm not thinking of adding additional graphics cards.

Also, I'm going to use a 64GB SSD in the beginning, I will add one with a higher capacity in the future. Just a 1TB 7200rpm in the beginning. Going to add 1 or 2 when they get cheaper. I don't think I'm going to use any additional PCIe ports. I'm running a couple of devices, but 5-6 at most. The case has 3 included fans, not going to use the lights. And just one optical drive.
February 22, 2012 5:39:24 PM

The calculator worked. I added the stuff I'm going to use in the first place, the stuff I'm going to use in the future, and even stuff I don't actually need and I got minimum/recommended 575W/625W which is under the HX650 I intended to buy.

I think it is a quality PSU and the right choice for me in this situation.

edit: I removed some of the stuff I didn't need and added a second graphics card. It got under 650W again. Not going to use 2 anyway.
February 22, 2012 5:59:16 PM

When it comes to the SSD's, you have to be a bit conservative on installing software to them and having a traditional hard drive is a must. I'm currently using a 120GB (112GB Effective) SSD as my main and only have about 10GB remaining. You may not need a larger SSD for many years, depending on what you'll be using the system for. Its common to have a second SSD in the 20-30GB range as a cache drive with such software as Intel Smart Response (Z68 motherboards). What this allows is for much faster access to commonly used files, and it doesn't cost an arm and a leg.

Anyway, it sounds like you made some great choices with your system. I might suggest not going all out on your storage hard drive, as prices are through the roof at the moment because of the Thailand flooding. You can always add more later :) 
February 22, 2012 6:07:33 PM

I will install the OS, the main things and some photo/video/stuff like that programs on it. I won't put games or Steam on it. I don't need really good speed for things that run fast already. When I had the XP for the first time I was really organised, everything in its place, category folders, recycling useful stuff right away. Now I got 10-20GB free space, older full HDDs, full flash drives, full desktops. I need to get organised this time either I won't get the most out of that SSD.

Also, Half-Life ftw.
February 22, 2012 6:45:28 PM

techtte said:
I will install the OS, the main things and some photo/video/stuff like that programs on it. I won't put games or Steam on it. I don't need really good speed for things that run fast already. When I had the XP for the first time I was really organised, everything in its place, category folders, recycling useful stuff right away. Now I got 10-20GB free space, older full HDDs, full flash drives, full desktops. I need to get organised this time either I won't get the most out of that SSD.

Also, Half-Life ftw.



I have to admit I did the opposite lol. I've got a bunch of games on my SSD with most of my productivity stuff on my spinners :)  What can I say, I hate loading times!
a c 183 K Overclocking
February 23, 2012 9:32:49 AM

techtte said:
You didn't say anything about the PSU. I think you meant that the PSU is 'good to go' aswell.

Yep the HX is a very good unit.
February 23, 2012 12:38:45 PM

davcon said:
Yep the HX is a very good unit.


One more thing, the TS120 comes with everything to install it on the MOBO?
While browsing I saw people talking about some issues regarding the installation.
!