Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

When over clocking CPU (i7 920), do I need CPU cooler Or System Cooler

Last response: in Components
Share
January 13, 2010 8:47:41 PM

Hi, I am building new computer. I want to over clock i7 920 from 2.66 to 3/3.2.
I am getting the CoolerMaster HAF 932 Case.
Do I need to buy CPU or System cooler?
Please recommend me some.



My system spec:
i7 920
Corsair 6GB 1600C7 Domintor GT with Fan
Corsair 1000HX
Asus P6T Deluxe
Nvidia 1GB GTS 250
2-4HDDs


Thanks in Advance
January 13, 2010 9:33:08 PM

If you have to ask questions like this, you are not ready to overclock.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
January 13, 2010 9:47:02 PM

yes you need a better cooler than stock fan that comes with it.. Look at the overclock forum or Google it..
m
0
l
Related resources
January 13, 2010 9:59:08 PM

djcoolmasterx said:
If you have to ask questions like this, you are not ready to overclock.


+1

I keep seeing people making posts daily that jump into overclocking or building systems them selfs without any knowledge at all. And then wondering why there system doesnt work anymore or doesnt work in the first place. When doing either building a system or overclocking you can cause alot of damage to your computer if you dont know what your doing. And it can be a very expensive lesson after you have a pile of expensive parts that no longer work. Its people who cant wait or take the time to look up the information thoroughly that end up damaging something. Then they come here in a panic and post something like "OMG PLEASE HELP"


Like someone else suggested take a little bit of time google it, read some forum posts. Research can be very helpful and save you some headaches in the future.
m
0
l

Best solution

January 13, 2010 10:17:36 PM

Here is a quick guide for you that i found on another site.

Quote:
Core i7 920/940 overclocking guide

Ever since the i7 was first mentioned the rumour machine about overclocking it has been spinning at full speed. The first rumour was that overclocking would be impossible because of the removal of the good old FSB, leaving the overclockers with nothing to increase. After the first rush of panic people started to actually think about what would replace the FSB: base clock (BCLK). Increasing this would increase the overall clock, right? Right. After the lifting of the NDA (and on some dubious sites before) the overclocking results were released. An average core i7 920 (2.66gHz, €300) turned out to be able to overclock nearly a full gHz.

But removal of the FSB and the introduction of the BCLK means a lot more chances. Everything is linked to the BCLK, which has confused quite a lot of the old school overclockers. Just to sort that out and set new overclockers on the right path, I've written this guide to core i7 920 overclocking.

First of all: neither me nor ********* is responsible for the damage you might do to your components following this guide.

Step 1: preparation
To overclock properly you should first inform yourself about the risks and advantages of overclocking. I will not be writing this all out, but this is the short version:

Risks:
- Shortened life of components when giving more volts than specified
- Extremely shortened life of components when giving an extreme voltage
- System instability
- You could contract the Megahurtz fever
- Burning out hardware (Which when caused by overclocking voids your warranty)

Disadvantages:
- Additional heat output


Advantages:
- Higher FPS in CPU based games
- More F@H ppd
- Higher benchmark scores

Does overclocking really increase performance?
Yes it does.


Having read this, you should start concentrating on the theory behind core i7 overclocking. The system is pretty easy: you have a base clock (BCLK), to which everything is linked using multipliers. This base clock can be adjusted from 100 to 250 in steps of 1. Stock is 133.

Multipliers
The following multipliers are available:
- CPU. With the 920 this is 12-20x
- QPI link (36, 48, slow). The QPI isn't really important for singlecpu systems, but keep it below 7-8gHz as most seem to be bugging out around that range.
- Memory (6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16x). Well quite obvious. Make sure your ram is running as fast as possible but don't overdo it.

Voltages
When pushing hardware over its rated specifications it will most likely need more voltage to run properly. The following major voltages are available on the i7:
- vCore. This is the juice going through the actual core. Stock: 1.18 Max. safe: 1.35 Max. extreme: somewhere around 1.55
- VTT (asus names it different). This voltage is going through the memory multiplier which is now integrated into the processor unit. Stock: 1.1-1.2 Max. safe: 1.35 Max. extreme: somewhere around 1.55
- vDIMM is going through the memory. Stock: 1.5-1.65 Max safe: 1.65 Max extreme: 1.5*VTT or VTT+0.7

Energy savings
As all experienced clockers know, Intel has some features built into their CPU's that lets them use less power when idling. Overclockers however, are not interested in that power consumption at all and those features go at the cost of stability.

The following features are recommended to be turned off:
- C1E state
- SpeedStep

HyperThreading
Revived from the old P4 days is hyperThreading (HT). HT basically means that a core is pretending to be two cores. In the i7 series Intel decided to have the cpu act like an octo core while being quad. This feature could be very useful in truely multithreaded applications but seems to make the cpu require 0.05 additional vCore. As long as you are not an extreme clocker or single/dualthreaded applications (games) user I'd recommend keeping it on. Personally I have it turned off for my F@H SMP client.
Share
January 13, 2010 10:47:02 PM

Thanks guys for the reply.
I apologize for not being clear on what I want.
I have been reading and researching about what should I buy and how to make the system for months also what to avoid and things like that. The thing is that I am not really comfortable with overclocking as I have not done it before and the processor is expensive and it is quite fast, this question is supposedly I do overclock it in the future how much money do I need to put a side for a cooler?

What I meant was that suppose I overclock the i7 920 and only put a cooler on the cpu is that enough? will my system will become hotter although I have installed a cooler on the CPU.

Thanks for your time. I understand some of you are frustrated when new comers asks you for some help...But let's not forget you were also once like us. Instead of only pointing out their mistakes talk about solutions give them some good articles links. Don't mean to be offensive.
m
0
l
January 14, 2010 1:34:36 AM

Iamme said:
Thanks guys for the reply.
I apologize for not being clear on what I want.
I have been reading and researching about what should I buy and how to make the system for months also what to avoid and things like that. The thing is that I am not really comfortable with overclocking as I have not done it before and the processor is expensive and it is quite fast, this question is supposedly I do overclock it in the future how much money do I need to put a side for a cooler?

What I meant was that suppose I overclock the i7 920 and only put a cooler on the cpu is that enough? will my system will become hotter although I have installed a cooler on the CPU.

Thanks for your time. I understand some of you are frustrated when new comers asks you for some help...But let's not forget you were also once like us. Instead of only pointing out their mistakes talk about solutions give them some good articles links. Don't mean to be offensive.



2 most important things when overclocking is having a good CPU cooler whether its Air cooler/ or water cooled. And good air flow in your case. Having good air flow in your case can make a big difference in cooling. Basicly you want to have air coming in the front and in the side(if you have side fan) and having fans on the rear of the case blowing outward and fans on the top of the case blowing outward. And as for the CPU you have, from what ive read the 920 overclocks very well for most people. Also i dont know what cpu cooler your using but if its the stock intel cooler that comes with the cpu I would overclock it. Intels stock CPU coolers arent good at all.

Here is a basic air flow diagram.

http://lh4.ggpht.com/_bT7iCxS33e0/SZ2ASnn4t8I/AAAAAAAAA...
m
0
l
January 14, 2010 2:17:17 AM

Well I haven't got my processor yet. I only have the RAM, Power Supply, DVDROM,HDDS. I am getting the processor and the case tomorrow. I will be using the fan that comes with the processor. The case (CM HAF 932)that I am getting has superb air flow.
The shop that I am buying it from are out of ASUS P6T Deluxe. They are out of the graphic card they only have the gainward one. So gotta wait for the motherboard and graphic card (asus/gigabyte)

Thanks for the reply.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
January 14, 2010 2:21:20 AM

I just happen to have a Coolermaster HAF 932. I bought a second one for a case mod project. It is a huge beast. Ventilation, airflow, and cooling are excellent.
m
0
l
a c 199 à CPUs
January 14, 2010 2:27:37 AM

My system spec:

Corsair 6GB 1600C7 Domintor GT with Fan - Expensive Mushkin CAS 7 DDR1600 is $164

Corsair 1000HX - way oversized ...twin GFX cards would only warrant an 850

Asus P6T Deluxe Get V2 version or ASUS P6X58D

2-4HDDs - what for ? Check out the performance charts and pick whatever 500 GB per platter drive performs best under your usage patterns. The WD Black 2 TB is a good choice but at smaller capacities, you are limited to the Seagate 7200.12 or the Spinpoint F3. The 7200.12 excels in gaming, multimedia and pictures whereas the F3 wins at music and movie maker. See the comparisons here (copy past link in manually, link won't work in forum):

(http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2009-3.5-desktop-har...[2371]=on&prod[2770]=on)

As for the CPU Cooler, the nice thing is that one of the very best HS coolers is also one of the easiest to install. Prolimatech Megahalems....one fan should be fine for 3.2 .... if you wanna go to 4.0 ..... 4.2 ....... 4.4 GHz, get two fans and the splitter

http://www.frozencpu.com/products/8807/cpu-pro-01/Proli...
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/7038/thr-41/Innovatio...
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/10026/fan-639/Scythe_...
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/8418/cab-150/FrozenCP...
m
0
l
a c 309 à CPUs
January 14, 2010 2:37:30 AM

You may be a bit confused. The retail cpu will come with an intel cpu heat sink and fan. It is adequate for stock operation.

A oem heat sink and fan, (aka cpu cooler) does a better job of getting heat off of the cpu die and transferring it to the air inside the case. The case ventilation is then responsible for getting the hot air out of the case, usually the back and top. With an oem heat sink, your cpu will be cooler, and also quieter because most oem coolers wil have a slow turning 120mm fan. The stock intel fan is smaller, and makes lots of noise when the cpu is under heavy load.

When overclocking, how high you can go is limited by how hot the cpu die gets. If it gets too hot, the cpu will downclock itself to prevent damage.

I like to install a oem cooler up front. It must be done with the motherboard outside of the case. Even if you don't oc, you will have a quieter system.
m
0
l
January 14, 2010 2:44:28 AM

Well if your using the cooler that comes with the I7 920 i would recommend against overclocking.
m
0
l
January 14, 2010 2:45:15 AM

Well I wanted to get the Corsair 850HX, but was not in stock. I am upgrading to Nvidia GTX 285 in april or march.
The price different is $67
and the 750HX and 850HX is $22.
Currently I have 2HDD=1.5TB
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
January 14, 2010 11:32:45 AM

Even with a single GTX 285 1000W PSU is still far too much. Also, I wouldn't upgrade to a GTX285 now anyway - the Radeon 5870 is a far superior card, uses less power and costs about the same - plus in a few months from now it'll be a bit cheaper.

You can run 2 Radeon 5870s on a 850W PSU - you really don't ever need 1000W unless you have lots of powerful graphics cards or crazy cooling systems.
m
0
l
January 14, 2010 6:05:56 PM

I am switching to 750HX.
I getting the GTX285 a few months later.

Thanks for your helps guys
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
January 14, 2010 11:06:00 PM

Seriously you'd be better off getting something other than the GTX285 - there are better cards out now, pls NVIDIA's Fermi cards may be out then as well. See what your options are before you buy.

Enoy your system in any case.
m
0
l
!