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Not sure where to find the mobo i want

Last response: in Motherboards
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April 24, 2010 6:55:46 AM

GIGABYTE GA-790XTA-UD4
^this is the motherboard i am currently looking at, its a good board, the only problem i have with it is the limitations of only 2 way crossfirex cards, i want to go three way in october after my inital build.
can anyone reccomend a motherboard with basically the same if not better specs for a simmilar price but with three slots for graphics cards?

More about : find mobo

a b V Motherboard
April 24, 2010 7:17:10 AM

Here's one. It's $40 more than the one you listed, but it also looks to be what you're looking for:
GIGABYTE GA-790FXTA-UD5
April 24, 2010 7:35:50 AM

haha why didnt i think of that (jus whack up the model number one) lol :D . thanks for that, much apreciated ;) 
Related resources
April 24, 2010 8:23:51 AM

you might think about a 5970., i am not a fan of multiple video card rigs....read this-

Benefits

There are two real benefits of being able to run multiple graphics cards. The primary reason is for increased performance with 3D applications, aka games. By having two graphics cards sharing duties at rendering the 3D images, PC games can be run at higher frame rates, higher resolutions and with additional filters. This can dramatically improve the quality of the graphics within these games.

The other benefit is for people who want to upgrade at a later point and time without having to completely replace their graphics card. By purchasing a graphics card and motherboard that are capable of running multiple cards, the user has the option of adding in a second graphics card at a later point and time to boost performance without having to completely remove his existing graphics card.

Disadvantages

The big disadvantage to running multiple graphics cards is the cost. With the top of the line graphics cards already pushing $500, its very tough for consumers to be able to afford a second one. While both ATI and NVIDIA offer lower priced cards with the dual card capability, it is often better for the consumer to instead spend an equal amount of money on a single card with equal or sometimes better performance than two graphics cards.

The other problem is that not all games can benefit from the multiple graphics cards. Some graphics engines were just not developed to properly utilize the multiple graphics core. In fact, some games might actually show a slight decrease in performance over a single graphics card. As newer games are released, this is becoming less of an issue. New games might not immediately benefit from the two cards as the graphics card drivers have to be updated to utilize the multiple cards correctly for improved performance.

Finally, the actual performance benefits of having the multiple graphics cards can vary greatly depending upon the other components in the computer system. Even with two of the highest level graphics cards, a low end processor can throttle the amount of data the system can provide to the graphics cards. As a result, dual graphics cards is typically recommended only in higher end systems.

Conclusions

For the average consumer, running multiple graphics cards makes absolutely no sense. The overall costs of the motherboard and graphics cards, not to mention the other core hardware necessary to provide sufficient speed for the graphics is just way too much. This solution only really makes sense to those individuals who want to have bragging rights on having one of the fastest graphics platforms possible, but similar user experiences in these games can be had for much less.

Some people might benefit from the multiple graphics cards though. Users who do periodically upgrade their components rather than replacing their computer system may want to look into having the option for upgrading their graphics card with a second card. This can be an economic benefit to the user provided a similar graphics card is available and has dropped in price from the initial cards purchase.
a b V Motherboard
April 24, 2010 8:39:39 AM

ronss said:
you might think about a 5970., i am not a fan of multiple video card rigs....read this-

Benefits

There are two real benefits of being able to run multiple graphics cards. The primary reason is for increased performance with 3D applications, aka games. By having two graphics cards sharing duties at rendering the 3D images, PC games can be run at higher frame rates, higher resolutions and with additional filters. This can dramatically improve the quality of the graphics within these games.

The other benefit is for people who want to upgrade at a later point and time without having to completely replace their graphics card. By purchasing a graphics card and motherboard that are capable of running multiple cards, the user has the option of adding in a second graphics card at a later point and time to boost performance without having to completely remove his existing graphics card.

Disadvantages

The big disadvantage to running multiple graphics cards is the cost. With the top of the line graphics cards already pushing $500, its very tough for consumers to be able to afford a second one. While both ATI and NVIDIA offer lower priced cards with the dual card capability, it is often better for the consumer to instead spend an equal amount of money on a single card with equal or sometimes better performance than two graphics cards.

The other problem is that not all games can benefit from the multiple graphics cards. Some graphics engines were just not developed to properly utilize the multiple graphics core. In fact, some games might actually show a slight decrease in performance over a single graphics card. As newer games are released, this is becoming less of an issue. New games might not immediately benefit from the two cards as the graphics card drivers have to be updated to utilize the multiple cards correctly for improved performance.

Finally, the actual performance benefits of having the multiple graphics cards can vary greatly depending upon the other components in the computer system. Even with two of the highest level graphics cards, a low end processor can throttle the amount of data the system can provide to the graphics cards. As a result, dual graphics cards is typically recommended only in higher end systems.

Conclusions

For the average consumer, running multiple graphics cards makes absolutely no sense. The overall costs of the motherboard and graphics cards, not to mention the other core hardware necessary to provide sufficient speed for the graphics is just way too much. This solution only really makes sense to those individuals who want to have bragging rights on having one of the fastest graphics platforms possible, but similar user experiences in these games can be had for much less.

Some people might benefit from the multiple graphics cards though. Users who do periodically upgrade their components rather than replacing their computer system may want to look into having the option for upgrading their graphics card with a second card. This can be an economic benefit to the user provided a similar graphics card is available and has dropped in price from the initial cards purchase.


Interesting information.

Anyway, if you copy/paste, please, write the source. Thank you.

http://compreviews.about.com/od/video/a/DualVideo.htm
April 24, 2010 8:48:05 AM

ronss said:
you might think about a 5970., i am not a fan of multiple video card rigs....read this-

Benefits

There are two real benefits of being able to run multiple graphics cards. The primary reason is for increased performance with 3D applications, aka games. By having two graphics cards sharing duties at rendering the 3D images, PC games can be run at higher frame rates, higher resolutions and with additional filters. This can dramatically improve the quality of the graphics within these games.

The other benefit is for people who want to upgrade at a later point and time without having to completely replace their graphics card. By purchasing a graphics card and motherboard that are capable of running multiple cards, the user has the option of adding in a second graphics card at a later point and time to boost performance without having to completely remove his existing graphics card.

Disadvantages

The big disadvantage to running multiple graphics cards is the cost. With the top of the line graphics cards already pushing $500, its very tough for consumers to be able to afford a second one. While both ATI and NVIDIA offer lower priced cards with the dual card capability, it is often better for the consumer to instead spend an equal amount of money on a single card with equal or sometimes better performance than two graphics cards.

The other problem is that not all games can benefit from the multiple graphics cards. Some graphics engines were just not developed to properly utilize the multiple graphics core. In fact, some games might actually show a slight decrease in performance over a single graphics card. As newer games are released, this is becoming less of an issue. New games might not immediately benefit from the two cards as the graphics card drivers have to be updated to utilize the multiple cards correctly for improved performance.

Finally, the actual performance benefits of having the multiple graphics cards can vary greatly depending upon the other components in the computer system. Even with two of the highest level graphics cards, a low end processor can throttle the amount of data the system can provide to the graphics cards. As a result, dual graphics cards is typically recommended only in higher end systems.

Conclusions

For the average consumer, running multiple graphics cards makes absolutely no sense. The overall costs of the motherboard and graphics cards, not to mention the other core hardware necessary to provide sufficient speed for the graphics is just way too much. This solution only really makes sense to those individuals who want to have bragging rights on having one of the fastest graphics platforms possible, but similar user experiences in these games can be had for much less.

Some people might benefit from the multiple graphics cards though. Users who do periodically upgrade their components rather than replacing their computer system may want to look into having the option for upgrading their graphics card with a second card. This can be an economic benefit to the user provided a similar graphics card is available and has dropped in price from the initial cards purchase.


Thanks for the info but there is no way i can afford that, let me show you my planning for this pc:

Initial System build
Item Name Price
Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-790XTA-UD4 £115.20
CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 955 £109.24
CPU Cooler: COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus £18.58
Graphics: Radeon HD 5850 £180.14
RAM: G.Skill 4Gb DDR3 1600 (2x2Gb) Ripjaws Dual-Chan Kit £90.42
HDD: Samsung 1TB Spinpoint SATAII 3.5” 7200 Internal HDD hd103sj £61.10
DVD: Sony Optiarc X2 £18.82
Case: Coolermaster HAF 922 £69.00
Screens: AOC F22 X3 (Native Resolutions of 1920 X 1080) £300.00
PSU: Antec EarthWatts 750 - power supply - 750 Watt £74.09
Wireless card: Intel WiFi Link 5300 £25.16
Total £1,061.75




Pre planned later expansion.
Item Name Price Comments
Graphics: Radeon HD 5850 £180.14 For X-Fire
RAM: G.Skill 4Gb DDR3 1600 (2x2Gb) Ripjaws Dual-Chan Kit £90.42 second kit to make 8 GB
HDD: Samsung 1TB Spinpoint SATAII 3.5” 7200 Internal HDD hd103sj £61.10 to make two TB in raid 1
SSD: undecided - possibility OS and programs disk only.
Total: £331.66
Grand Total After All Further Upgrades: £1,393.41
Possibility of water cooling much later for silent computer and for better heat removal.
Second set of upgrades will be in the order listed.

!