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How to compare graphics cards?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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November 8, 2009 2:09:54 PM

I am a bit overwhelmed at the flood of information here. My own fault, as I am not familiar with the terms and categories. I am attempting to compare a NVIDIA GeForce 6150 SE to a ATI Radeon HD 4350 512MB. Can anyone guide me through the charts, or simply translate the differences to me? Much thanks =)

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a c 140 U Graphics card
November 8, 2009 2:47:57 PM

You may have issues finding a good comparison. I believe the Geforce 6150SE is integrated graphics and the 4350 is an actual video card. You are basically looking to upgrade from onboard to a discrete video card. The difference between these two is so astronomical it doesn't REALLY deserve a comparison.

What is your reason for upgrading? We can help guide you through the best discrete video card for your need. However, anyone here will tell you that going from onboard video to ANY expansion card has ALOT of benefits. Are you looking to game, video editing, higher resolutions, or just better over all graphics?
November 8, 2009 3:00:17 PM

jay2tall said:
You may have issues finding a good comparison. I believe the Geforce 6150SE is integrated graphics and the 4350 is an actual video card. You are basically looking to upgrade from onboard to a discrete video card. The difference between these two is so astronomical it doesn't REALLY deserve a comparison.

What is your reason for upgrading? We can help guide you through the best discrete video card for your need. However, anyone here will tell you that going from onboard video to ANY expansion card has ALOT of benefits. Are you looking to game, video editing, higher resolutions, or just better over all graphics?


I need to use multiple monitors for research purposes. The time it will save me when compared to using half sized windows and clicking back and forth will be very beneficial. The 4350 is available to me for $60, and from what I understand will handle the dual display. I don't have a need for any sort of advanced gaming or video editing.
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a b U Graphics card
November 8, 2009 3:18:15 PM

Where are you located? You should be able to find a cheaper solution that that for multi-monitor support in N.Am.

Also depends on your monitor requirements: VGA? DVI?

Unless you need dual DVI, you should be able to find cheaper from places like NewEgg where they are about $25. You can get HD4550 and 4650 for less. Even dual DVI cards are less than $50, and really on the single DVI models if your resolution is 1920x1080 or less you should be able to drive the second monitor with a passive HDMI->DVI adapter.
Also there are GeForce 9500GTs cheaper than $60 that would do the trick with or without dual DVI.
November 8, 2009 4:25:59 PM

TheGreatGrapeApe said:
Where are you located? You should be able to find a cheaper solution that that for multi-monitor support in N.Am.

Also depends on your monitor requirements: VGA? DVI?

Unless you need dual DVI, you should be able to find cheaper from places like NewEgg where they are about $25. You can get HD4550 and 4650 for less. Even dual DVI cards are less than $50, and really on the single DVI models if your resolution is 1920x1080 or less you should be able to drive the second monitor with a passive HDMI->DVI adapter.
Also there are GeForce 9500GTs cheaper than $60 that would do the trick with or without dual DVI.


I am in N. America. I am actually purchasing a new computer, as the old one is incapable of keeping up with new work software. With multiple web pages open and a couple of programs running I could type a paragraph before the first letters appear on the page. The purchasing department would most likely prefer me to take the $60 "upgrade" as opposed to buying something aftermarket in order to maintain the warranty. Thank you both for the input! Now I just need to see if the processor speed is okay, so many options. But that is for another forum isn't it?
a b U Graphics card
November 8, 2009 4:41:03 PM

Yep, check in the CPU forum, we can help in general, I just don't like the forum getting bogged down in it, and personally I don't deal with consumer desktop CPUs, just mobile and Workstation & Server (and even then not so much anymore since changing jobs).

Anywhoo, if you're doing a work build then yes that GPU is a good solution with lotsa great current and future potential for general 2D computing tasks and should handle the current workload easily.
!