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Is overclocking bad for your processor?

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March 4, 2012 11:21:44 AM

Does overclocking shorten the life of a CPU? I have a 1GHz processor and would like to overclock it.

More about : overclocking bad processor

a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 4, 2012 12:40:26 PM

Overclocking raises the amount of heat your processor is going to generate. As long as you monitor and ventilate the heat from the processor so it doesn't get too warm, overclocking is a safe way to squeeze a little more performance out of your processor.
You need a good heatsink, and good CPU temp monitoring software to control this situation.

If the processor gets too hot, of course you can shorten the life, or even kill it instantly. One cause of the processor overheating is you must commonly raise the voltage to get an overclock to run stable. This of course only adds to the heat building problem. Again, very important to monitor how hot your CPU is getting.

Mild overclocking like 1-10% usually can be accomplished with the stock heatsink and not too much worry about anything. If you want more than that, you have to start being more careful about how hot things are going to get.

Yes overclocking can shorten the life of your CPU. If you do it correctly, shoot it might only last 160 years or so rather than 200 years. Point is, yes you are going to shorten the life, but the life span of you CPU will outlive you and your kids, and your grand kids, (or basically the usefulness of the CPU) so everything in perspective.

Now, if you do something wrong, like way over volt, let the thing get way too hot, you can shorten the life of the CPU to like .031 seconds. You have to know what you are doing and watch the results.

Different processors overclock differently. Years ago, processors were pretty much binned at the max they would run anyway, as the competition between manufactures was all about speed and megahertz. Overclocking on them was hit and miss, and most of the time very limited. It would be helpful to know exactly which processor you have so we could tell you what your chances are and how far you could expect to go. Second thing is the motherboard, as years ago most motherboards were not built with any overclocking options in the BIOS. You had to buy an expensive board to get to play with things.

Last but not least, overclocking a 1ghz processor is not going to get you much. Basically you are going to turn a very, very slow processor into a really, really slow processor. :) 
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 4, 2012 1:38:30 PM

+3 to @jittpublisher great job!
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December 7, 2012 8:08:22 AM

jitpublisher said:
Overclocking raises the amount of heat your processor is going to generate. As long as you monitor and ventilate the heat from the processor so it doesn't get too warm, overclocking is a safe way to squeeze a little more performance out of your processor.
You need a good heatsink, and good CPU temp monitoring software to control this situation.

If the processor gets too hot, of course you can shorten the life, or even kill it instantly. One cause of the processor overheating is you must commonly raise the voltage to get an overclock to run stable. This of course only adds to the heat building problem. Again, very important to monitor how hot your CPU is getting.

Mild overclocking like 1-10% usually can be accomplished with the stock heatsink and not too much worry about anything. If you want more than that, you have to start being more careful about how hot things are going to get.

Yes overclocking can shorten the life of your CPU. If you do it correctly, shoot it might only last 160 years or so rather than 200 years. Point is, yes you are going to shorten the life, but the life span of you CPU will outlive you and your kids, and your grand kids, (or basically the usefulness of the CPU) so everything in perspective.

Now, if you do something wrong, like way over volt, let the thing get way too hot, you can shorten the life of the CPU to like .031 seconds. You have to know what you are doing and watch the results.

Different processors overclock differently. Years ago, processors were pretty much binned at the max they would run anyway, as the competition between manufactures was all about speed and megahertz. Overclocking on them was hit and miss, and most of the time very limited. It would be helpful to know exactly which processor you have so we could tell you what your chances are and how far you could expect to go. Second thing is the motherboard, as years ago most motherboards were not built with any overclocking options in the BIOS. You had to buy an expensive board to get to play with things.

Last but not least, overclocking a 1ghz processor is not going to get you much. Basically you are going to turn a very, very slow processor into a really, really slow processor. :) 


Booing said:
Does overclocking shorten the life of a CPU? I have a 1GHz processor and would like to overclock it.



Excellent summary. One thing though.

I wasn't aware that very<really lol
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August 16, 2013 7:47:00 AM

Answer to the question - Yes overclocking your processor can be damaging depending on the type of processor, it's overclocking ability and how much it is overclocked.

Just a word of advice, overclocking may sound like 'a cheap way to squeeze some extra performance out of a system' but in my opinion, for beginners it is best left well alone. Overclocking of low - mid range processor based systems will see increases so small that they won't even probably be noticeable in real-time applications (loading times, frame rates etc.) People expect to see a performance jump equal to that of a purchase of better hardware and that usually just isn't the case. Usually people will see artifacts and errors before they 'see' any performance improvement.

Do some more research. Overclocking changes the way your components work and were designed to work usually causing glitches and errors that wouldn't normally occur. Clicking a slider or button in windows is easy but you're actually changing voltages and wavelengths in the microscopic structures on your hardware, something they aren't usually designed for. Keeping a system's CPU ,GPU and RAM at the speeds they are meant to run at ensures they operate correctly and increases their lifespan hugely.

Overclocking can only be done properly on dedicated hardware. Hardware that was built with overclocking in mind can overcome these disadvantages and enjoy increased stock speeds and stable interface but the hardware can usually be more expensive and difficult to setup. It must also receive more cooling than a standard system to relieve excess heat which will be produced by overclocking.

On today's quad core i5 3470 and a GTX 660 with 2 monitors, a non overclocked, cheap as, system base that can run and play most apps and games at highest settings (i have a PC like this at home) there is really no need for the risk or cost of overclocking as i see it. Some of the builds i have seen....people must play 5 games at once on 10 monitors or something because i am still to see anything to bring that machine to it's knees.

In summary, instead of risking your current hardware overclocking or buying hardware for overclocking, save your dollars and when purchasing hardware in the future go for processors and video cards that are not built for overclocking. you will get a cheaper price and you ensure your hardware is operating the way it was intended by the developers of apps and games.

Just speaking from 30 years of experience, something that younger people just don't have and this it what i have seen and learnt. There could be many arguments to my reply but I just want to tell you what i know. Up to you guys to make your own mind's up but the key is research.
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