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Hitachi HDD SATA goes undetected

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September 21, 2011 2:17:29 AM

Hello,My relatively new Hitachi HDS721050CLA362 HDD decided to die on me when I xfered it from a gigabyte mb to an msi 890fxa-gd70 mb. The 3 other HDD's I xfered are detected and still work fine. I tried returning the hitachi to the gigabyte mb and still no detection. the gigabyte mb still works fine and I'm setting it up in another system.
The hitachi warms up and seems to have disc rotation. Trying different sata connections and cables didn't help. Can I just get another Hitachi hdd and switch out circuit boards? Is there any software fix for this? Perhaps Linux or Ubuntu? vs Windows 7? DOS doesn't see it either.
a c 277 G Storage
September 21, 2011 1:19:24 PM

Depending on the source of the problem, you might try utilities to repair the partition/format information or read the individual sectors and piece together the files.

EASEUS offers a free data recovery package: http://easeus.com/datarecoverywizard/free-data-recovery... . It's fairly good at recovering from format failures. If that does not work, there are packages that will scan what is readable on the drive and recover files; they are usually free to scan but cost to recover more than one file.

Do not write to the drive, do not format it. Any write activity is likely to make recovery harder and less likely.

(begin rant) There is too much talk on this forum about switching circuit boards. It only helps if A) the problem is on the circuit board, and B) you have the skills to remove the programmable chip from the first board and move it to the second. This chip contains information about the geometry of the platters without which they cannot be read.

While a new board will fix some problems, most problems have nothing to do with that. But, for some reason, it's a "solution" that is in vogue right now. Simpler solutions are more likely to work, so let's save the next-to-last-ditch solution for, well next-to-last. (end rant)

I will now be flamed by the more experienced technicians who do this swap frequently.

Best solution

a c 271 G Storage
September 21, 2011 9:35:48 PM
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Hitachi PCBs store unique, drive specific "adaptive" information in an "NVRAM" chip. This chip needs to be transferred from patient to donor. Data recovery professionals warn that a straight board swap is dangerous on a Hitachi drive due to the risk of NVRAM overwrite.

In any case, if the drive spins up, then the PCB is most probably OK. This is because its MCU executes a POST before it commands the motor controller to spin up the drive.

You could try MHDD to access the drive directly. It bypasses BIOS.

http://hddguru.com/software/2005.10.02-MHDD/
Related resources
September 22, 2011 3:46:25 PM







WyomingKnott said:
Depending on the source of the problem, you might try utilities to repair the partition/format information or read the individual sectors and piece together the files.

EASEUS offers a free data recovery package: http://easeus.com/datarecoverywizard/f
Spoiler
r
ee-data-recovery-software.htm . It's fairly good at recovering from format failures. If that does not work, there are packages that will scan what is readable on the drive and recover files; they are usually free to scan but cost to recover more than one file.

Do not write to the drive, do not format it. Any write activity is likely to make recovery harder and less likely.

(begin rant) There is too much talk on this forum about switching circuit boards. It only helps if A) the problem is on the circuit board, and B) you have the skills to remove the programmable chip from the first board and move it to the second. This chip contains information about the geometry of the platters without which they cannot be read.

While a new board will fix some problems, most problems have nothing to do with that. But, for some reason, it's a "solution" that is in vogue right now. Simpler solutions are more likely to work, so let's save the next-to-last-ditch solution for, well next-to-last. (end rant)

I will now be flamed by the more experienced technicians who do this swap frequently.



I tried the easus recovery pkg and nothing..it didn't recognize the drive. I did find out one other piece of information though, If I boot the system with the bad hdd connected it will not boot. Nor will it even get so far as to connect to the key board. It does spin the bad hdd and there's a very quiet, intermittent click which I had not noticed previously. If I disconnect the drive at any time the system will boot. I guess this just suggests the problem is even worse than previously thought.
October 2, 2011 3:47:07 AM

fzabkar said:
Hitachi PCBs store unique, drive specific "adaptive" information in an "NVRAM" chip. This chip needs to be transferred from patient to donor. Data recovery professionals warn that a straight board swap is dangerous on a Hitachi drive due to the risk of NVRAM overwrite.

In any case, if the drive spins up, then the PCB is most probably OK. This is because its MCU executes a POST before it commands the motor controller to spin up the drive.

You could try MHDD to access the drive directly. It bypasses BIOS.

http://hddguru.com/software/2005.10.02-MHDD/

I have downloaded the MHDD but haven't tried it yet.. It sounds like the best viable solution thus far..
dg
October 2, 2011 3:47:18 AM

Best answer selected by grantd01.
!