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Core 2 duo T6600 vs i3-330M vs i3-350M vs i5-430M

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January 18, 2010 11:52:36 AM

Hi all....

I'm a non-gamer( i dont even play solitaire or minesweeper :p  ) ... and im planning to get a notebook for my day to day use which includes more of photoshop, multimedia, networking and browsing.... it wud be nice if i get a technical insight from you ppl...

More details..

1) Intel® Core™ i3-330M (2.13Ghz, 4Threads, 3M cache)
2) Intel® Core™ i3-350M Processor (2.26Ghz, 4 Threads, 3M cache)
3) Intel® Core™ i5-430M (2.26Ghz, 4Threads, turbo boost up to 2.53 GHz, 3M cache)
4) Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor T6600 (2.20GHz/ 800 FSB/ 2MB Cache)

its not a problem if one is costlier over the other.. until it satisfies my purpose... and also let me know if my kinda user wud really need a iX processor ??

Thanks in advance...
a c 159 à CPUs
January 18, 2010 1:51:42 PM

The i5 will be the fastest on your list. Get 4 gigs of ddr3 ram if possible for windows 7.
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January 19, 2010 1:26:52 AM

hmm would the core2duo T6600 compare to the i3 330m? cuz i'm planning to get a laptop too but the ix series laptop offered does not have a discrete video card while the T6600 has an nvidia 230m, i plan to use it for some 3d rendering and a little gaming
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February 13, 2010 6:17:34 AM

is i5 processor ok wid a 3gb ram??? cause apparantly i cant seem to upgrade to a 4 gb ram...
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a c 127 à CPUs
February 13, 2010 6:46:37 AM

adarsha_tamrakar said:
is i5 processor ok wid a 3gb ram??? cause apparantly i cant seem to upgrade to a 4 gb ram...


No 4GB? Make sure the OS is a 64bit if you can select that. Most notebooks will only provide 3GB of memory with a 32bit OS.
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March 19, 2010 5:15:56 PM

What? I think you have it backwards. If you have 4 GB of memory, you need a 64 bit OS to fully utilize it. The physical address limit of a 32 bit processor is 4 GB. They use some of the address space for I/O devices, so less than 4 GB is addressable using 32 bit addresses. If you go to a 64 bit OS it can address 4 GB and more. So any PC with 4 GB or more memory installed needs a 64 bit OS to address the full memory.

If you install 4 GB in a machine with 4 GB of memory you will be able to access about 3.5 GB, so it is a little better than 3 GB. Still, I doubt you will ever see an issue because you are only running 3 GB instead of 4 GB.

Rick
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March 21, 2010 9:04:02 PM

You have asked which of these four processors is best suited to your purposes.

The i5-430M is the best suited for your current needs, with some room to grow if you discover that you might want to upgrade your system in the future.

The Intel i5-430M is a fast "upper middle class" dual core processor. Along with Intel's other new generation processors in the i9 and i7 and i3 lines, the i5-430M is right in the middle of Intel's next generation of chips that were based based on the "Nehalem"design.

Amongst other tech innovations, this generation of Intel CPU is "much greener" than previous Intel generations of chips such as the Core 2 Duo T6600 which you mention. Intel's i-series - particularly the mobile chips - are much more efficient at driving the system, using far less electricity to achieve similar results to comparable chips in the Core 2 Duo series. While the i5-430M omits a few high-end features you'll see in the more powerful i9 and i7 series [these two series are suited for gaming / entertainment enthusiasts, scientists and other professionals who require more serious computing power], the i5 remains best suited to your requirements.

You have also mentioned a couple of i3 chips - the i3 represents the bottom end of Intel's new i-series CPU's - most all of the technological innovations we see present in the i9 and i7 and i5 series have been disabled to knock the price way down for the very most basic i3 series.

The i3 series is unsuited to the needs that you describe.

It was built by Intel solely for marketing purposes - Intel needed a line of rock-bottom cheapest CPU in order to have one entry in their new i-series that could compete effectively in the "under $150" mobile CPU market and the i3 is it.

Happy computing! :hello: 
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April 7, 2010 4:12:53 PM

I have 30 years of computing experience. My advice to you is to buy the notebook with the color and shape you like best. Any of the processors listed are an over-kill for your needs. And all have the same performance as seen with the naked eye. In other words, if I give you four notebooks all which look the same externally but with different chips inside, you won't be able to tell the difference. If you say one is the fastest of the lot today, you will give a different answer tomorrow.

Don't fall for the marketing.

My guess is that the i3, i5, and all the variants are the exact same chip. Those going out on the conveyor belt on the left gets labeled i3-330m. Those on the conveyor belt on the right are labeled i5, and so on. It's cheaper this way for Intel to make more money than to sell all at the i3 price (or to really have two production lines). :lol: 
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April 17, 2010 10:07:17 PM

Get the i5, you will still need some raw number crunching power for a lot of tasks. Also Windows 7 is graphics chip accelerated so don't discount graphics off hand. If it was me I would buy the cheapest i5 system available, with a screen that does 75hz.
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April 17, 2010 11:05:22 PM

I think that an i3 chip would be enough processing power for you. It is probably more important to get a laptop with the 4 GB of memory and the 64-bit OS. I have a laptop with these two specs and it is as fast as my Vista desktop system.
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Anonymous
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April 28, 2010 12:55:19 PM

I am using i5-430 since last month.... go for it.. Its really fast and u will find much difference in computing compare to other processors..

i5-430 + 4Gb RAM+ Windows 7 will be the right system which fulfill all ur needs of computing.
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May 1, 2010 10:27:10 PM

kingkong_11 said:
I have 30 years of computing experience. My advice to you is to buy the notebook with the color and shape you like best. Any of the processors listed are an over-kill for your needs. And all have the same performance as seen with the naked eye. In other words, if I give you four notebooks all which look the same externally but with different chips inside, you won't be able to tell the difference. If you say one is the fastest of the lot today, you will give a different answer tomorrow.

Don't fall for the marketing.

My guess is that the i3, i5, and all the variants are the exact same chip. Those going out on the conveyor belt on the left gets labeled i3-330m. Those on the conveyor belt on the right are labeled i5, and so on. It's cheaper this way for Intel to make more money than to sell all at the i3 price (or to really have two production lines). :lol: 


WTF lol ?

The op wants to use the laptop for photoshop and multimedia and you are saying there is no diff in performance between those processors ?

obviously "30 years of computing experience" has not paid off very well.

the i5-430 will have the best power if you are planning to use photoshop and do media editing, photoshop and most media editing software scale very well with mutli core processors.

4gb of ram would also be the way to go and yes get a 64bit version of windows 7
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May 3, 2010 6:15:26 PM

@Yogeshprabu

New Core ix series feature a lot of improvements over the old T6600. First of all they all have Hyperthreading technology that somewhat improves performance in some programs especially while running multiple threads. There are 2 physical cores on die but with the help of the OS, the CPU is identified as a 4 core processor thus making itself available for running 4 simultaneous threads. When there's a problem running a thread (e.g. missing data), the CPU automatically picks up another one while waiting for the data to complete the first one. So programs can use every bit of CPU's resources. But generally this improvement won't be over 15-20% That's a big deal in those programs, though.

The second improvement is the integrated Intel HD graphics and memory controller. They are based on 45nm technology. This is the most powerful GPU Intel produced to date. You can run The Sims 3 fluently with it (around 30fps) at medium details and resolution.

The CPU cores themselves are built with 32nm technology minimizing power consumption. Both T6600 and new i series CPUs have 35 Watt TDP but the latter manage this low TDP with built-in IGP and memory controller. I think the cores alone in the Core ix series have the same TDP as the P series that is 25 Watt.

As a conclusion, if you find a laptop featuring discrete graphics like 'Den807', simply buy it neglecting its CPU. Newer nVidia GeForce GPUs also accelerate Photoshop CS4+ Otherwise stay current with the new Core i3 CPUs. I think you'll get more performance in PS with T6600+GT 230 than with a Core i5 430m alone.
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May 3, 2010 6:19:08 PM

Yogeshprabu said:
Hi all....

I'm a non-gamer( i dont even play solitaire or minesweeper :p  ) ... and im planning to get a notebook for my day to day use which includes more of photoshop, multimedia, networking and browsing.... it wud be nice if i get a technical insight from you ppl...

More details..

1) Intel® Core™ i3-330M (2.13Ghz, 4Threads, 3M cache)
2) Intel® Core™ i3-350M Processor (2.26Ghz, 4 Threads, 3M cache)
3) Intel® Core™ i5-430M (2.26Ghz, 4Threads, turbo boost up to 2.53 GHz, 3M cache)
4) Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor T6600 (2.20GHz/ 800 FSB/ 2MB Cache)

its not a problem if one is costlier over the other.. until it satisfies my purpose... and also let me know if my kinda user wud really need a iX processor ??

Thanks in advance...





you must be choice Intel® Core™ i5-430M (2.26Ghz, 4Threads, turbo boost up to 2.53 GHz, 3M cache)
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May 3, 2010 6:19:13 PM

Yogeshprabu said:
Hi all....

I'm a non-gamer( i dont even play solitaire or minesweeper :p  ) ... and im planning to get a notebook for my day to day use which includes more of photoshop, multimedia, networking and browsing.... it wud be nice if i get a technical insight from you ppl...

More details..

1) Intel® Core™ i3-330M (2.13Ghz, 4Threads, 3M cache)
2) Intel® Core™ i3-350M Processor (2.26Ghz, 4 Threads, 3M cache)
3) Intel® Core™ i5-430M (2.26Ghz, 4Threads, turbo boost up to 2.53 GHz, 3M cache)
4) Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor T6600 (2.20GHz/ 800 FSB/ 2MB Cache)

its not a problem if one is costlier over the other.. until it satisfies my purpose... and also let me know if my kinda user wud really need a iX processor ??

Thanks in advance...





you must be choice Intel® Core™ i5-430M (2.26Ghz, 4Threads, turbo boost up to 2.53 GHz, 3M cache)
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May 5, 2010 2:31:09 PM

hi,boy!
you should make the choice for i5 if you wanna not be left behind.you know the tec's running fast
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May 9, 2010 6:20:10 AM

I'm trying to shop for a laptop for a gift...

It's obvious that the i5 430m is the best of the cpu's listed... but how does the T6600 compare to the i3 cpu's performance wise?

I'm trying not to break the bank and the i5 systems I'm finding are 600-700... i'm trying to keep my max price to around 550-600 though.

I've found an HP DV4i system w\ an i3, 3gb, 320gb, 14'' display... but 14 is kinda small IMO.

For the same price, I'm finding different models w\ the T6600, 4gb, 250gb, and 17'' display for the same sub 600 price range.
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May 10, 2010 3:32:56 PM

itadakimasu said:
I'm trying to shop for a laptop for a gift...

It's obvious that the i5 430m is the best of the cpu's listed... but how does the T6600 compare to the i3 cpu's performance wise?

I'm trying not to break the bank and the i5 systems I'm finding are 600-700... i'm trying to keep my max price to around 550-600 though.

I've found an HP DV4i system w\ an i3, 3gb, 320gb, 14'' display... but 14 is kinda small IMO.

For the same price, I'm finding different models w\ the T6600, 4gb, 250gb, and 17'' display for the same sub 600 price range.



Hi,

I have 20 years technical support experience, for what it's worth, and have been responsible for 1000's of corporate laptops of every shape, size and spec. I can tell you that KingKong_11 comments are accurate. There is only one reason to consider processors at all (in current machines), and that is for tasks which require high processing power - virtualisation / high end gaming or image layering/rendering animation

For example, if you use a word processor, email, surf the web, play films and listen to music then you will not be able to distingish differences between any modern processor - you would not be able to tell the difference. I currently run a PC that does all of this on a > 5 year old AMD chip. I also have a Quad Core machine I use for virtualisation and manipulating very large Photoshop images. (>100MB size)

You can use Photoshop very effectivley, on cheaper processors and will only see an improvement if you perform complex 'rendering' and 'layering' on very large pictures (50MB and up)

Display size, is something you have to live with - there is quite a bit of difference between 14" and 17" - and also some extra weight!

The amount of memory you have does really help, but more than 3GB is only of any use if you have a 64bit operating system.

** The speed of the hard disk makes a much bigger difference to performance - if it is 7200rpm it will be much better than 5400rpm - but will likley reduce battery life. ** SSD disks are blazzingly fast but as they are currently cutting edge, they are woefully expensive.

Hope this helps,

www.uktech.co.uk/support
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Anonymous
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May 21, 2010 10:31:59 PM

I have experience with the i3 and i5.

I am a student studying business and economics, I also trade FOREX. my computer needs are for school entertainment and business. I recently had to purchase a new pc. I purchased my laptop from tiger direct, after two weeks returned it and tried another. i repeated this process till i found the laptop that was right for me, was very frustrating but my experience can help your decision i think.

I tested two laptops(hp/gateway) equipted with the i3 330m, 64bit windows 7 OS and 4gb ram. I tried each for two weeks before returning them, I settled on an i764 DELL laptop with i5 430m 64bit OS win 7, 4gb ram. After a few minutes multi tasking i could tell the difference between the i3 and i5, my mind was made up.

The difference in the processors are astonishing. I multi task and can be tough on the pc's. often i have ms office. mt4, 3 diff browsers(all 3 browsers on different pages like youtube/google video etc), skype, msn, yahoo, aol and visual studios running all at once, at times even more applications running and the i3 was not suitable for my usage. It was clear i found the limits of the i3, the i5 handles everything i throw at it with ease, I plan on owning this pc for years to come and not having to worry about upgrading.

The i5 is your only choice, even if you dont multi task as much as i do that fact that i found the limits of the i3 so easily is proof enough that the limits are pretty easy to find. Buy a nice looking laptop that is the right size to fit your needs, get at least the i5 430m processor as well, you can be assured that it will be up to every task you use it for.
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Anonymous
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May 21, 2010 10:45:58 PM

itadakimasu said:
I'm trying to shop for a laptop for a gift...

It's obvious that the i5 430m is the best of the cpu's listed... but how does the T6600 compare to the i3 cpu's performance wise?

I'm trying not to break the bank and the i5 systems I'm finding are 600-700... i'm trying to keep my max price to around 550-600 though.

I've found an HP DV4i system w\ an i3, 3gb, 320gb, 14'' display... but 14 is kinda small IMO.

For the same price, I'm finding different models w\ the T6600, 4gb, 250gb, and 17'' display for the same sub 600 price range.
I recently puschased an i764 with 17.3" led lcd monitor, only weighs 6lbs and i love the big 17" screen. very lite,its more of a desktop replacement than a portable mini laptop for $789. a bit out of your range, finding a laptop that is 15.4' or bigger w the i5 is going to be tough unless you get one from ebay.
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June 23, 2010 6:04:08 PM

http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/850014/MSI-A6200-...

There you go, I5-430M processor, 4GB mem for $549.99

I bought it, and it was love at first sight.

I'm not a big gamer, but i played some games on this computer just to test out the Intel HD integrated graphics, and i was blown away. I can play new games like mass effect 2, cryis (low res), and torchlight (<--60FPS!) with no problem at all.

People telling you that dedicated graphics are the only way to go, can kiss my butt, cuz this computer does it all at lightning speeds. you won't be disappointed

It's a 32 bit, but honestly, you dont need to worry about that at all. As of now, most of the software you'll use is 32 bit and the 64 bit wont help you that much unless you're running an 8GB ram machine.

Trust me, this laptop is the way to go
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June 24, 2010 1:56:32 AM

XXwildthingXX_78 said:
You have asked which of these four processors is best suited to your purposes.

The i5-430M is the best suited for your current needs, with some room to grow if you discover that you might want to upgrade your system in the future.

The Intel i5-430M is a fast "upper middle class" dual core processor. Along with Intel's other new generation processors in the i9 and i7 and i3 lines, the i5-430M is right in the middle of Intel's next generation of chips that were based based on the "Nehalem"design.

Amongst other tech innovations, this generation of Intel CPU is "much greener" than previous Intel generations of chips such as the Core 2 Duo T6600 which you mention. Intel's i-series - particularly the mobile chips - are much more efficient at driving the system, using far less electricity to achieve similar results to comparable chips in the Core 2 Duo series. While the i5-430M omits a few high-end features you'll see in the more powerful i9 and i7 series [these two series are suited for gaming / entertainment enthusiasts, scientists and other professionals who require more serious computing power], the i5 remains best suited to your requirements.

You have also mentioned a couple of i3 chips - the i3 represents the bottom end of Intel's new i-series CPU's - most all of the technological innovations we see present in the i9 and i7 and i5 series have been disabled to knock the price way down for the very most basic i3 series.

The i3 series is unsuited to the needs that you describe.

It was built by Intel solely for marketing purposes - Intel needed a line of rock-bottom cheapest CPU in order to have one entry in their new i-series that could compete effectively in the "under $150" mobile CPU market and the i3 is it.

Happy computing! :hello: 


Wow you seem to be trying very hard to sell the guy a Ferrari when he really needs a Camry. I do most things he does and even some gaming at the native 1366x768 resolution on older games like World of Warcraft (Steady 60fps on low setting cause my GPU sucks) and the I3-330M takes it in stride. Can burn, browse and work with files at the same time without a hitch. So yes the bottom of the line I3 is not so weak as you seem to project it. So unless he wants to run Crysis at full setting/resolution and do some serious protein folding even the I5 is not an absolute necessity. But hey if you got the money its always good to go up a notch, but to answer his question the I3 with 3GB or more of Ram should work ok. Not to mention if you are doing a lot of mobile computing i.e running on battery the I3 will get you the most time on the standard battery.
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June 24, 2010 4:20:30 AM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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