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Preliminary Parts List...Any thoughts?

Last response: in Overclocking
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March 8, 2012 4:30:39 AM

Hi guys. I'm looking to watercool my computer. 2 GTX 470's and cpu.
I'm looking mostly to just make things a little quieter as I know little about overclocking. A little wiggle room would be nice if I decide to take it up though.
I have little room in my case for rads but I'd like it mostly contained inside. I should be able to fit the dual rad on the top inside of case.
I currently have a corsair h70 on the cpu that will go away to make room for another rad if needed.
If I go with another rad, would it have to be a separate loop or can it just be a separate rad in a 2 radiator single loop?
Also, the quieter pump is...? d5 or ddc

VGA blocks -Aquacomputer 2X GTX 470

CPU block -Aquacomputer cuplex kryos pro

Reservoir -XPSC Dual bay / D5 pump

Radiator -Alhphacool nexxxos xt45 dual 120mm.... or
-XPSC EX240 dual 120mm low profile

SLI Connector -Phobya 2 slot (or 1)... or
-Aquacomputer SLI bridge

Fittings -phobya 3/8 x 1/2 compression fittings- black nickel
(buying 4 straight, two 45 degree and two 90 degree... should be enough)

Case -Cooler Master HAF 922

PSU -Ultra X4 750 watt

Motherboard -Asus Sabertooth 990FX

CPU -AMD 1055t
March 8, 2012 6:35:28 AM

A few major things here.

ehwall said:
Hi guys. I'm looking to watercool my computer. 2 GTX 470's and cpu.


If you're looking to watercool two graphics cards and a CPU, a 240mm rad is simply not enough. Not enough by a long shot, actually; especially if you're going to want room to overclock. Ideally, you should calculate your heat load on the loop (that's the heat load of each of your GPU's at a certain frequency + the heat load of your CPU at a certain frequency) and then multiply that by the C/W for your radiator(s). Go to SkineeLabs.com, look up your radiator, go to page 3 or 4 of the radiator review, and search for a table with a column that says C/W over it. This basically tells you how efficiently those rads are going to dissipate the heat in your loop. Search for "Delta-T radiator pc watercooling" or some such - there are lots of guides on how to do all of this. If you do all the calculations, buy premium radiators, and are OK with not having the coolest temps in the universe, it's possible you could make 360mm of rad space work.

If you just want to play it safe and not do any calculations, I'd go with 480mm of rad space. If you're going to eventually overclock the hell out of your components, you MAY need more. Again, to get a good answer you NEED TO DO THE CALCULATIONS.

ehwall said:
If I go with another rad, would it have to be a separate loop or can it just be a separate rad in a 2 radiator single loop?


Two rads on the same loop is a totally fine set up. In fact, it's more efficient that having them on separate loops because the rads get to distribute their cooling prowess over all of your components. This is a nice fact because it means you can split up your rads however you want; you can have two 120mm rads and a 240mm rad, for example, if you can fit those in different locations but don't have room for the 480mm rad. Just keep in mind that each rad ups the restriction, so get a good pump and don't buy 10x 120mm rads.

ehwall said:
Case -Cooler Master HAF 922


This is a great case, but I don't think it has the watercooling space you need. If you remove that lower hard drive tray, you'll probably be able to mod the case to fit in an additional 240mm radiator down there (one up top and one down low, as it were). This should be more than sufficient for your needs, and will probably give you enough cooling to significantly overclock your components. I'm currently in the process of learning how to do this to my case...got a Phantom 410 and it just didn't have enough rad space, so I'm making space, dammit! If you're interested, I'll keep you informed on what I find out.

Oh, and if you have trouble finding guides for all this crap, lemme know - I'll post the links for ya, but it's 3:30 in the morning right now and I'm lazy.
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March 8, 2012 1:44:45 PM

Quote:
Search for "Delta-T radiator pc watercooling" or some such - there are lots of guides on how to do all of this.


Including one on the watercooling sticky at the top of the watercooling forum...which I'm betting wasn't read.

Quote:
Again, to get a good answer you NEED TO DO THE CALCULATIONS.


Yep; agreed.

A lot of Aquacomputer stuff...why? They make good stuff, but it's a bit pricey compared to other sites. Just curious why people choose everything from one single site when you can find better value elsewhere.
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March 8, 2012 4:08:47 PM

Quote:
Just curious why people choose everything from one single site when you can find better value elsewhere.
yeap, i got my stuff from 6~7 dif stores online

for sure , the watercooling sticky hasn't been read.

* once you've determined the TDP, you'll know why that 240 is not going to cut it.
** Aquacomputer rads?
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March 8, 2012 5:34:32 PM

Just re-read and saw that you're going for a quiet build. In all likelihood, this means you'll need at least 600mm (that's 5 120mm sections) of rad if not 720mm. I looked up the stock TDP of your components and it's going to be 525W - that's 525 watts of heat you'll have to dissipate at STOCK clocks. If you start overclocking, that number's going to shoot into the 600 and 700s.

A 120mm rad can dissipate 150-200w with the right fans, but they're not going to be quiet. If you're going quiet, you'll be severely limiting your rad efficiency (which is fine if you like things being quiet, a primary reason people get into watercooling is how quiet it can be). For quieter builds, you probably won't be able to effectively dissipate much more than 100W per 120mm. This clearly depends very heavily on what your particular definition of "quiet" is. 525W/100W = 5.25, 5.25 x 120mm rads = 600+mm of rad required.

I hate to do crappy estimations like this; hopefully you haven't answered because you're checking out SkineeLabs, seeing how many decibels your fans will produce at certain RPMs, then cross checking that with the C/W of your rad(s) with fans at that speed, etc., etc. :) 

Delta-T, C/W, fan decibel rating vs. CFM, static pressure, and TDP are your friends...
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March 8, 2012 6:36:55 PM

For a 5-8C delta, you can usually guesstimate a 120mm worth of rad will dissipate between 145-160 watts, depending on actual rad being used.

An RX360 can dissipate around 600 watts with 1500 rpm fans, even more with 2000+. Also, TDP is an estimate that you will utilize 100% of all components 100% of the time without any loss due to power conversion or utilization. You can easily take 85% your total 'suggested' TDP and use this as a more realistic model, but this also tends to shift when people overclock video cards. The more power you use, the more heat you create and the less efficient your hardware becomes in doing so.

So, for most people, it's easy to calculate best case scenario TDP and use it to allow for additional overhead instead of planning to hit your calculated output wattage exactly and hope you are correct.
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March 8, 2012 7:55:44 PM

Thanks for the input. I also had found my tdp at 525. I was looking at rads and am finding it hard to find info on 240mm rads.Does Skinee only test triples. Or just assume it's double your guesstimate of appx 146-160 watts per 120mm of rad? Or take 2/3 the value of the Skinee tested product? Just trying to see if two 240mm may work? If I register at Skinee's,are there other tests to be found? Having trouble regersting at the moment..

I have been reading these forums and stickys for the last couple weeks, though. Trying not to blurt out each time I have a new question, and while very informative, it leads me to more questions. But hey I'm up for a challenge.

As far as the aquacomputer goes, I just threw the cpu in at last miniute. I was going to leave the h70 on my cpu and only do the gpu's... and I was on that site... As far as I can find they are the only 470 blocks out there these days ( and they're purdy }. The connector bridge just to stay 'stock' between the 2 cards , which I'm more likely to just go wit a pipe/tube anyway. While I'm mentioning that... looking at some pics of some rigs, am I good in assuming that water is flowing backward in 1 ot the video cards?
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March 8, 2012 7:58:38 PM

Quote:
While I'm mentioning that... looking at some pics of some rigs, am I good in assuming that water is flowing backward in 1 ot the video cards?


Backward? There isn't really a directional flow...but depending on how they are setup, this would be essentially the case if you ran them in serial.
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March 8, 2012 8:01:38 PM

That's what I figured. Shoulda kept quiet there..
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March 8, 2012 9:04:56 PM

While CPU blocks are typically designed with a specific in/out (in is usually directly over the center of the CPU block), GPU blocks are designed for flow either way through them.
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