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What is HPC mode?

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  • CPUs
  • BIOS
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
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March 8, 2012 11:20:09 PM

in my bios i have hpc mode disabled. what is it used for. i am an overclocker and i think this might be hindering my vcore limit

More about : hpc mode

a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 9, 2012 12:23:18 AM

From another web site:

"There is an option called HPC Mode that prevents the CPU from lowering its clock rate under load."
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 9, 2012 12:29:49 AM

When the CPU is under load, it can't 'throttle' itself down or lower it's speed by locking the clock rate. It is a 'green' thing to allow the CPU to throttle down when idle. If you are manually setting the clock and multiplier, you want it disabled so it WON'T try to lower your speed you are setting.
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March 9, 2012 12:46:09 AM

scottiemedic said:
When the CPU is under load, it can't 'throttle' itself down or lower it's speed by locking the clock rate. It is a 'green' thing to allow the CPU to throttle down when idle. If you are manually setting the clock and multiplier, you want it disabled so it WON'T try to lower your speed you are setting.


THANKYOU! your post was actually helpful ! unlike the one COLgeek left..
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 9, 2012 12:47:10 AM

Anytime, have fun OCing.
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a c 159 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 9, 2012 12:50:25 AM

diablo34life said:
ummm ok? then what does high performance computing do...

Did you even look at the link? If you had, you might have learned something. Think about it.
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March 9, 2012 12:54:25 AM

COLGeek said:
Did you even look at the link? If you had, you might have learned something. Think about it.


dont comment on the page if you dont know what your talking about. someone asks a question and you lead them to a full page discussion... atleast copy and paste what was "suppose" to be helpful into the thread. i read the link btw and that didnt help out at all..... nice try i guess ..
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a c 159 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 9, 2012 12:56:41 AM

diablo34life said:
dont comment on the page if you dont know what your talking about. someone asks a question and you lead them to a full page discussion... atleast copy and paste what was "suppose" to be helpful into the thread. i read the link btw and that didnt help out at all..... nice try i guess ..

Now, now, young one. No need to show one's ignorance. Learn a few things and then we'll have a debate.

Until then, have fun and good luck!

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March 9, 2012 1:01:10 AM

COLGeek said:
Now, now, young one. No need to show one's ignorance. Learn a few things and then we'll have a debate.

Until then, have fun and good luck!


yes until then dont leave any more of your "tips" lmao. i was going to even specify in the description yes i know it stands for high computing mode, i thought i wouldnt have to go into detail about that but of course someone trys to describe what it stands for an not what it actually does LMAOOOOOO
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a c 159 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 9, 2012 1:07:07 AM

HPC mode in some systems is used to optimize "clustering" commodity systems into near super computer capacity. Essentially, it allows basic systems to be grouped into a large "virtual" system capable of processing much more data than as a group of individual systems.

It is simply a BIOS/UEFI setting on systems to support this set of features, thus the motherboard question.

Care to debate the topic now, oh learned one?
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a c 159 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 9, 2012 1:11:07 AM

BTW, be careful changing any settings that may restrict throttling. You could irreparably damage components if you overheat the system by pushing it too hard.

Verify that your temps stay safe and that your cooling (air or water) system is effective.

See, I am a nice guy, too.
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March 9, 2012 1:32:21 AM

Best answer selected by diablo34life.
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March 9, 2012 1:34:24 AM

COLGeek said:
BTW, be careful changing any settings that may restrict throttling. You could irreparably damage components if you overheat the system by pushing it too hard.

Verify that your temps stay safe and that your cooling (air or water) system is effective.

See, I am a nice guy, too.



ive already selected the best answer for the thread : ) im happy to say it was not you....
live and learn my friend. one day you will actually give that help to someones question if you keep at it
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a c 159 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 9, 2012 10:27:29 AM

You win some and you lose some.

Your advice, is duly noted.

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March 9, 2012 3:31:08 PM

COLGeek said:
You win some and you lose some.

Your advice, is duly noted.


thank you for not sharing anymore of your tips
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
October 11, 2012 3:18:28 PM

COLGeek said:
What make and model of motherboard are you using? HPC usually equals "High Performance Computing". Check here for more info:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-performance_computing



Dude!!! Wow!! You are a genius!!
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a c 159 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
October 11, 2012 3:24:32 PM

Quote:
Dude!!! Wow!! You are a genius!!

'Tis true. I am!

[8-)
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July 27, 2013 3:53:38 AM

COLGeek said:
diablo34life said:
ummm ok? then what does high performance computing do...

Did you even look at the link? If you had, you might have learned something. Think about it.


I looked at that link. It was not a concise answer, and at least the first bit is mostly about super computers.
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!