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Looking to OC my E8400, help?

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  • CPUs
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
March 15, 2012 5:11:51 PM

Current specs:
E8400 3.0 GHz (333 FSB)
Gigabyte EP45-UD3R mobo
8gb g.skill DDR2-800 duel channel RAM
nVidia 550 GTX Ti 1gb

Should I overclock to around 3.6? or up the FSB to around 400? I am running at stock speeds with a aftermarket cooler on my CPU.

I've never overclocked before, and this is currently the only rig that I have available for daily computing for school and for leisure/gaming. So, I definetly don't want to mess anything up and would only OC if I can do it the right/safe way.

I play SC2 and will be playing Diablo 3 when it releases on May 15th, so I was looking to get some added performance.

The cooler is a Thermaltake CL-P0378 90mm CPU Cooler, and if you aren't able to view the picture the temps are core0 running at around 32C and core1 running at around 41C.

Current Temps:

More about : e8400

a c 328 à CPUs
a c 144 K Overclocking
March 15, 2012 5:33:29 PM

Quote:
Should I overclock to around 3.6? or up the FSB to around 400


Upping the FSB to 400 is how you overclock to 3.6.........

I had that exact CPU/MB combo running for years at 4.050Ghz ( 450FSB ).

That is not a great cooler. The ZeroTherm Nirvana NV120 I had on mine kept the CPU in the upper 20s at idle and low 60s under a Prime 95 load and that was at 4Ghz.

So even though it's not a great cooler 3.6Ghz should be easy for it since you should not have to touch voltage to hit that. Just leave everything on Auto and raise the FSB to 400. Check your temps and run Prime 95 for a few hours to make sure it's stable. You will want to change the memory to run at a 1:1 ratio with the FSB. That will not overclock the RAM but will make it run at it's rated 800Mhz speed.

Here is a good Core2 overclocking guide.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/259899-29-core-overcl...
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March 15, 2012 5:42:59 PM

How exactly do I change the ratio of the ram to 1:1?
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Related resources
a c 328 à CPUs
a c 144 K Overclocking
March 15, 2012 5:55:38 PM

In BIOS.
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March 15, 2012 6:00:21 PM

I realize that. I guess I'll have to look around for the memory settings in the BIOS.
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a c 328 à CPUs
a c 144 K Overclocking
March 15, 2012 6:06:50 PM

I forget exactly where but look in advanced memory options or somewhere similar.
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a c 198 K Overclocking
a c 173 à CPUs
March 15, 2012 7:46:43 PM

This should be your first stop (what anort linked to).
Core2 Overclocking Guide (generic guide based on an Asus motherboard)
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/259899-11-core-over...

Shadow's Gigabyte motherboard OC guide:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/page-245679_11_0.ht...
It's for an EP35-DS3L but all the Gigabyte Core2 BIOS's are similar.

Go through the guides for background material, but because you have a G'byte board, use Shadow's guide.

Take your core voltage off Auto and set your memory voltage to 2.2 volts. Change the System Memory Multiplier from AUTO to 2.00 to set the Memory Frequency to twice the FSB. That will give you a 1:1 FSB:RAM ratio.Then when you increase the FSB, the memory clock will rise in in proportion with it. At an FSB of 333 MHz, your memory clock should be at 667 MHz. At 3.6 GHz, your FSB freq will be 400 MHz and your memory clock will be at 800 MHz.

Do not exceed 1.45 volts on the CPU cores or a load temp of 70 C. You have a mediocre cooler but the thermal load of a C2D is quite a bit less than a quad.

Looks like you have a chip with a relatively low VID. This should give you quite a bit of overclocking headroom even with your cooler. That's the reason I suggest running your memory at 2.2 volts.

If you do get much past a 400 MHz FSB freq, you may need to spend some time on your memory. You can usually squeeze some more speed from your memory by running it at 2.2 volts and relaxing the timings a bit. Go from 4-4-4-12 to 5-5-5-15 or from 5's-15 to 6's-18. That will seem slow, but Core2 systems are relatively insensitive to memory timings.

For that matter, don't bother with trying to run your memory faster than 1:1.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/251715-29-ratio-myth

I really like the G'byte boards for the Core2 CPU's. I have been able to get enough performance from them to wait for Ivy Bridge.

GA-EP45-UD3P | Q9550 OC'd to 3.6 GHz (425 MHz X 8.5) C3 stepping :( 
GA-EP45-UD3L | Q6600 OC'd to 3.6 GHz (400 MHz X 9)
GA-EP35-DS3P | E7500 OC'd to 4.1 GHz (373 MHz X 11)
GA-G41M-ES2L | E6500 OC'd to 3.87 GHz (352 MHz X 11) Motherboard FSB limited.

All are 24 hour Prime95 stable and all have SpeedStep enabled.
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March 17, 2012 1:58:48 AM

I am going to go ahead and do the CPU OC first and make sure it runs stable before I do the RAM OC.

I have some questions though..

Quote:
Take your core voltage off Auto and set your memory voltage to 2.2 volts. Change the System Memory Multiplier from AUTO to 2.00 to set the Memory Frequency to twice the FSB. That will give you a 1:1 FSB:RAM ratio.Then when you increase the FSB, the memory clock will rise in in proportion with it. At an FSB of 333 MHz, your memory clock should be at 667 MHz. At 3.6 GHz, your FSB freq will be 400 MHz and your memory clock will be at 800 MHz.


Core Voltage is the CPU Vcore, right? When I take it off auto. What do I put it on? It says normal is 1.25V

Memory Voltage is the the DRAM Voltage, right? So change this to 2.2V from Auto. It says normal is 1.8V

Also, the System Memory Multiplier can be changes to 2.00B and 2.00D. B is for 333MHz FSB MCH strapping, and D is for 400MHz FSB strapping. So I'm assuming I should do the 2.00D, because when I OC to 3.6 GHz it will be 400 FSB. Right?

So, to summarize for CPU OC --

Keep the RGI at Auto
Enable the CPU Host Clock Control to be to overclock
Change the CPU Host Frequency to 400MHz
Change the PCI Express Freq. to 100MHz
Disable C.I.A.2

What do I do with the CPU Vcore?

To summarize for RAM OC --

Change Performance Enhance from Turbo to Standard
Change the System Memory Multiplier from Auto to 2.00D
Change the DRAM Voltage (Under Motherboard Voltage Control) from Auto to 2.2V

And thats it? Don't do anything to the MCH Frequency Latch?

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

I don't have a System Voltage Control option in my BIOS. Should I disregard this?

Quote:
System Voltage Control: Determines whether to manually set the system voltages (i.e. CPU core voltage, RAM voltage, PCIe voltage, etc). "Auto" lets BIOS automatically set the system voltages as required. I recommend that you set this to "Auto" only if your overclock is small like 10-11%. Set this to "Disable" if your overclock is high (i.e. 400+Mhz CPU speed increase). Also set this to "Disable" if you need to change RAM voltages, this is specially true for most high performance RAM like the Crucial Ballastix and Corsair XMS2, etc. If your RAM is higher than 1.8v you must set this to "Disabled" . ***(see near end of this section)
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a c 198 K Overclocking
a c 173 à CPUs
March 17, 2012 1:48:38 PM

Quote:

Also, the System Memory Multiplier can be changes to 2.00B and 2.00D. B is for 333MHz FSB MCH strapping, and D is for 400MHz FSB strapping. So I'm assuming I should do the 2.00D, because when I OC to 3.6 GHz it will be 400 FSB. Right?

But you are starting at 333 MHz. :) 

My P45's are both using a 2.00B System Mem Mult.

You do not need to do anything with the MCH Freq Latch, especially with a dual core processor. With a quad, you might - although I didn't.

System voltage control - remember what I said:
It's for an EP35-DS3L but all the Gigabyte Core2 BIOS's are similar. The P45's and G41's do not use this.

CPU voltage:
After you take the core voltage off Auto, you will be able to tell what the VID is. That is the point where you want to start increasing the voltage as you push the FSB freq higher.

I suggest increasing the RAM voltage to 2.2 volts at the beginning of the overclock process. It is one less thing to worry about. Once you reach a stable overclock, you can try reducing it.

Like I said above, I do not overclock my RAM past 1:1. The small increase in memory i/o does not translate into increased system performance. And 1:1 is the "happy spot" for system stability.

While I am thinking about it: Load line calibration.
Use whichever you need for best stability. The Q6600 has it turned off. The Q9550 has it turned on.
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