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I5-750 or i5 650 ?

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January 22, 2010 8:35:48 AM

I thought I had settled on the following.

Intel Core i5-750 Lynnfield 2.66GHz 8MB Cache
Mobo - GIGABYTE GA-P55A-UD3 LGA 1156
RAM - G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB)
GPU - Radeon HD 5770 (Juniper XT) 1GB

Have just been asked to consider an Intel Core iS-650 3.20GHz 4MB Cache.

Any views on which to go with would be greatly appreciated as I am pretty much clueless and the more I look into it the more confused I am although I now have some understanding of the turbo impact etc.

Present usage is 20% Gaming, 30% internet, 10% photos/video and 40% work related that includes a lot of data processing in Excel and Access. I do not intend to overclock at this point in time.

Thanks in advance.

More about : 750 650

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January 22, 2010 9:04:23 AM

Go for the 750 as it's a quad core as opposed to a hyperthreaded dual core like the rest of the i5 range.
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January 22, 2010 9:06:33 AM

MG0Z said:
I thought I had settled on the following.

Intel Core i5-750 Lynnfield 2.66GHz 8MB Cache
Mobo - GIGABYTE GA-P55A-UD3 LGA 1156
RAM - G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB)
GPU - Radeon HD 5770 (Juniper XT) 1GB

Have just been asked to consider an Intel Core iS-650 3.20GHz 4MB Cache.

Any views on which to go with would be greatly appreciated as I am pretty much clueless and the more I look into it the more confused I am although I now have some understanding of the turbo impact etc.

Present usage is 20% Gaming, 30% internet, 10% photos/video and 40% work related that includes a lot of data processing in Excel and Access. I do not intend to overclock at this point in time.

Thanks in advance.

The i5-750 for sure.

There are probably only two advantages the i5-650 holds over the i5-750, and for the desktop, they are negligible and in your circumstances, even more so.

The "greatest" advantage is that the i5-650 has an graphics core bundled in on the die, but it won't work on your chosen motherboard and is completely pointless as you are buying a discrete video card anyway.

The i5-650 will overclock higher than the i5-750, thanks to the former being made on a 32nm process, but the degree to which it does this, is unlikely to bring any meaningful real world performance.

Power consumption will be lower, but as you are a desktop user and the power consumption of the i5-750 is quite good in its own right anyway, then again not so great an advantage.



Now some reasons why the i5-650 won't make any sense over the i5-750,

It only has two cores vs the i5-750's four cores and hyperthreading is better than nothing, but not better than another core.

Providing you have reasonable cooling/airflow and your computer isn't a HOT BOX, then the i5-750 through Turbo Boost can run at 3.2Ghz if only one or two cores are activated, whereas the i5-650's top speed with Turbo Boost is 3.46Ghz.

I see the i5-750 as a very clear victor over the i5-650.
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January 22, 2010 11:56:16 AM

Chad Boga said:
I see the i5-750 as a very clear victor over the i5-650.

*the crowd goes wild*
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January 22, 2010 11:18:14 PM

I would look at the i5 750 as superior architecture and a processor that has a commanding class improvement above the 650. Also, the i5 750, is just a swap away from an i7-8xx, as they share a similar socket. I'd consider the 750 as both performance for now, as well as keeping your system open for expansion.
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March 6, 2010 7:57:14 PM

I also have recently been looking at the i5 750 vs 650, though from what it says here and a few other forums I've read I think the 750 is victorious for me too. I was slightly confussed with the 650 having integrated graphics whereas the 750 doesn't though I guess though only difference that makes to me is that I'll be getting a dedicated GPU which I didn't intend on, but hey ho!
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June 17, 2010 5:54:50 AM

There is also other things to consider apart speed.
The speed difference gained by the 750 is minimal. It does not even factor. But what people should consider is the following.

the 650 has more futures.

the 650 is 32 nm smaller and smaller heat released.
the 650 is 73w as opposed to 750's 95w. less heat produced.

The 650 has visualization futures such as as direct i/o which let's you dedicate and entire device such as a graphics card to a virtual box. meaning you can run 2 operating systems on 2 monitors seamlessly and without emulating drivers. try doing that with a 750.

I choose the 650, because of the less power consumption, less heat and more futures that are really useful.

Also the 750 is 2.66GHz and has 4 cores but no hyper threading technology but the 650 is 3.2GHz with 2 cores and 2 hyper threads. So to put it in perspective.

the hardware of the 650 is faster and the 750 comes close to it only if the software has been written correctly and even then it might be slightly faster.Something that you won't ever notice. So it comes down to if you trust more hardware to do its job or software. I develop software and i trust hardware more :D 

link to compare
peace
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June 17, 2010 2:55:46 PM

MG0Z said:
Present usage is 20% Gaming, 30% internet, 10% photos/video and 40% work related that includes a lot of data processing in Excel and Access. I do not intend to overclock at this point in time.


I would go with i7 860 then (I think that hyper-threading from it will do a lot of difference using Excel).

But, between 750 and 650, i vote for 750 :wahoo: 
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June 18, 2010 2:00:19 PM

Go with the 750.

The "futures" that 00001 lists have nonexistent to minimal relativity for most users out there. In fact, I don't know anyone that uses "virtual boxes" although I am sure there are people that do. Compare the features of the two and see what you NEED.

A big reason the 650 has a lower power usage is in part because it has 2 cores less than the 750. 00001 failed to consider what 4 cores can do over 2. Hyperthreading is NOTHING compared to physical cores, but it is better than 2 cores without hyperthreading. But that's not saying too much.

0001 tried to make it sound like software was not written for more than 2 cores. If you plan on using this computer for the next 3-4 years, you will find more and more software being written for 4+ cores. This is especially true for games, and most modern games can already take advantage of 3 cores if not 4.

I know you said you don't intend to overclock, but I really suggest that you do. You can greatly increase your processor's performance/watt just by doing a minor overclock. All you have to do is increase you base clock, bclk. There is a great article here on Tom's that goes into the 750's efficiency.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i5-750-efficie...

Plus why would you not want a bit of free performance? I'm also talking about a very modest overclock here. Just increase your BCLK to 150, and you are done.

Although something that I did not think about- are you planning on getting an aftermarket cooler? The cooler that comes with the 750 is pretty much crap. It's not even very good for keeping the processor cool at stock speeds. I would spend the $30 on a hyper 212+ and get a modest overclock. Actually, this is exactly what I will be doing in a few weeks :) 
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June 18, 2010 5:11:03 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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