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Overclocking a 2500k 4.5 vcore problem

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March 17, 2012 8:56:35 PM

Hi today I decided to Overclock ny i5 2500k to 4.5 Ghz. I am fairly new to overclocking so I followed this guide , (I have a Gigabyte P67A-D3-B3 so a similar model to the one in the guide) I followed the guide exactly until it came to changing the vcore when I suddenly realized that there was no setting to change the vcore. After some research I found out that the board automatically changes the vcore so I went ahead with the overclock and booted into windows, where I ran a few load tests which all did very well with a temperature of 35 at idol and 65 at load the only thing I found strange was that the vcore voltage in cpuz was not changing and was staying at 1.116 V that can not be right can it ? I am also worried that the motherboard might make the vcore to high and damage the cpu is that possible ?

Thx in advance
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March 17, 2012 11:12:13 PM

I have experienced that CPU-Z will become unresponsive while stress testing. Open Hardware Monitor. That should let you know.

Also, There should be a setting with pretty much any board that allows you to change voltage. Go into the BIOS and there should be some Vcore options. There is probably a place where it says auto Vcore, but you should be able to change that to offset or fixed/manual.
March 18, 2012 11:23:51 AM

there is defiantly no setting in bios to change the vcore I have searched everywhere I can however the vcore voltage in power management but its no use for stress tests, there is however a Dynamic Vcore (DVID) option but I have no idea what that is ? I have also tried to use hardware monitor as yous suggested but the vcore in that stays the same to :/ 
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March 18, 2012 11:33:09 AM

The option may be hidden in bios until you turn off "automatic" or as the case may be "dynamic" vcore. Usually toggling it will allow you to put in a manual vcore to whatever you want as long as the board supports it. Hope this helps.
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March 18, 2012 5:52:04 PM

What settings are in dynamic Vcore? Check all Vcore settings and options. It might be hidden somewhere. Also, like he said, you may find it if you disable your auto Vcore.
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March 18, 2012 7:17:45 PM

You'll have to find the setting to change it from AUTO to Manual, and you'll be wanting to try 1.29-1.3v for 4.5 generally
March 19, 2012 9:11:39 AM

I checked everywhere I can not find a setting :/  anyway Bios is telling me vcore is at 1.3 so i guess it should be ok and its been running no problem for several days now.
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March 19, 2012 11:32:50 AM

Maximw said:
Hi today I decided to Overclock ny i5 2500k to 4.5 Ghz. I am fairly new to overclocking so I followed this guide , (I have a Gigabyte P67A-D3-B3 so a similar model to the one in the guide) I followed the guide exactly until it came to changing the vcore when I suddenly realized that there was no setting to change the vcore. After some research I found out that the board automatically changes the vcore so I went ahead with the overclock and booted into windows, where I ran a few load tests which all did very well with a temperature of 35 at idol and 65 at load the only thing I found strange was that the vcore voltage in cpuz was not changing and was staying at 1.116 V that can not be right can it ? I am also worried that the motherboard might make the vcore to high and damage the cpu is that possible ?

Thx in advance



Don't worry my friend the vCore(1.116 V) is pretty much low and won't damage the CPU for as long as it will not go over 1.45V your safe.
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March 19, 2012 12:57:24 PM

aqe040466 said:
Don't worry my friend the vCore(1.116 V) is pretty much low and won't damage the CPU for as long as it will not go over 1.45V your safe.

Um, 1.116v is less than stock. It is a miss reading. And 1.45v is far too high even with high-end cooling as the life of the CPU will drain very quickly!
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March 19, 2012 12:59:12 PM

Maximw said:
I checked everywhere I can not find a setting :/  anyway Bios is telling me vcore is at 1.3 so i guess it should be ok and its been running no problem for several days now.

Yeah, as long as it is stable for what you are doing, it really is fine.
March 25, 2012 3:20:07 PM

You're all pretty much un-informed. First of all intel says safe voltages up to 1.45 i believe, so id like you to tell me how it will damage his cpu. Secondly, DVID or "offset voltage" on gigabyte boards is straightforward. Base vcore is 1.22-1.25 for a 2500k. +0.05 is 1.27, +0.1 is 1.32 and so on. Make sure to calculate the vcore if you set it manually, but no in most cases setting dvid to auto will not fry your cpu unless you go for 5.2ghz or something. Secondly, between 1.35v and 1.5v it has more to do with temperature than voltage, as the oc'd frequencies really put heat into the cpu. anything above 85C for an extended period of time is not good, and generally you dont want to go past 4.2-4.5 with stock intel cpu.
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March 25, 2012 6:17:36 PM

joshott said:
You're all pretty much un-informed. First of all intel says safe voltages up to 1.45 i believe, so id like you to tell me how it will damage his cpu. Secondly, DVID or "offset voltage" on gigabyte boards is straightforward. Base vcore is 1.22-1.25 for a 2500k. +0.05 is 1.27, +0.1 is 1.32 and so on. Make sure to calculate the vcore if you set it manually, but no in most cases setting dvid to auto will not fry your cpu unless you go for 5.2ghz or something. Secondly, between 1.35v and 1.5v it has more to do with temperature than voltage, as the oc'd frequencies really put heat into the cpu. anything above 85C for an extended period of time is not good, and generally you dont want to go past 4.2-4.5 with stock intel cpu.

Actually, Intel has stated that 1.52v is safe for a 2500k. Do you believe that is true? OF COURSE NOT! Tom's has done research and shown the 1.4v can be dangerous to the CPU. I think I even heard that is can reduce life down to a matter of months.

With the stock cooler I wouldn't go past stock! It is the worst cooler on the planet! I use MX-4 thermal paste with my stock cooler and it already peaks @ 72C in games, not even Prime95! 72.6C is the maximum safe for the 2500k.
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March 25, 2012 6:18:34 PM

joshott said:
You're all pretty much un-informed. First of all intel says safe voltages up to 1.45 i believe, so id like you to tell me how it will damage his cpu. Secondly, DVID or "offset voltage" on gigabyte boards is straightforward. Base vcore is 1.22-1.25 for a 2500k. +0.05 is 1.27, +0.1 is 1.32 and so on. Make sure to calculate the vcore if you set it manually, but no in most cases setting dvid to auto will not fry your cpu unless you go for 5.2ghz or something. Secondly, between 1.35v and 1.5v it has more to do with temperature than voltage, as the oc'd frequencies really put heat into the cpu. anything above 85C for an extended period of time is not good, and generally you dont want to go past 4.2-4.5 with stock intel cpu.

By the way, I am not uninformed. I have a 2500k that I have overclocked and I have done my research. I know how most of them act.
April 2, 2012 10:55:29 PM

HostileDonut said:
With the stock cooler I wouldn't go past stock! It is the worst cooler on the planet! I use MX-4 thermal paste with my stock cooler and it already peaks @ 72C in games, not even Prime95! 72.6C is the maximum safe for the 2500k.


72.6 is the Tcase. the 72 degrees measurement i believe you are using (which is what realtemp, coretemp e.c.t. read off of) is the Tjunction or Tjmax, which for the 2500K is 98.
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April 4, 2012 8:56:34 PM

jwk3 said:
72.6 is the Tcase. the 72 degrees measurement i believe you are using (which is what realtemp, coretemp e.c.t. read off of) is the Tjunction or Tjmax, which for the 2500K is 98.

Tcase is the temperature and TJMax is the temperature at which the CPU shuts itself off to prevent further damage.
April 4, 2012 9:12:05 PM

HostileDonut said:
Tcase is the temperature and TJMax is the temperature at which the CPU shuts itself off to prevent further damage.


I'm confused by the "tcase is the temperature" part... can you be more specific?

and the part I was referring to was you saying 72 is too hot. bearing in mind it starts to throttle at the mid 90s I cant see why 72 degrees is too hot :/ 
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April 4, 2012 10:12:51 PM

jwk3 said:
I'm confused by the "tcase is the temperature" part... can you be more specific?

and the part I was referring to was you saying 72 is too hot. bearing in mind it starts to throttle at the mid 90s I cant see why 72 degrees is too hot :/ 

Tcase is the actual temperature of the CPU. TJMax is when the CPU shuts off. Tcase changes, TJMax does not because that is just what it is set to throttle at.

72.6C is the maximum 'safe' temp stated by Intel and 98C is when the CPU will really start to take a good amount of damage by heat. Keep it under 72.6C for regular use.
April 4, 2012 10:47:25 PM

HostileDonut said:
Tcase is the actual temperature of the CPU. TJMax is when the CPU shuts off. Tcase changes, TJMax does not because that is just what it is set to throttle at.

72.6C is the maximum 'safe' temp stated by Intel and 98C is when the CPU will really start to take a good amount of damage by heat. Keep it under 72.6C for regular use.


I'm sorry but where did you get that information?

My understanding, backed up by the evidence below is that Tcase and Tjunction are different readings. Here is a snippet of what Intel state about temp readings:

"TCASE is the temperature measurement using a thermocouple embedded in the center of the heat spreader. This initial measurement is done at the factory. Post-manufacturing, TCASE is is calibrated by the BIOS, through a reading delivered by a diode between and below the cores."

"Tjunction Max is the maximum temperature the cores can reach before thermal throttling is activated."

http://www.intel.com/support/processors/sb/CS-033342.ht...

If you are still confused think about it like celcius and Fahrenheit measurements (AS AN EXAMPLE), where the Tcase is celcius (the lower number) and Fahrenheit is the Tjunction. These numbers are not on the same scale and therefore cannot be compared like you are.
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April 5, 2012 2:14:30 AM

jwk3 said:
I'm sorry but where did you get that information?

My understanding, backed up by the evidence below is that Tcase and Tjunction are different readings. Here is a snippet of what Intel state about temp readings:

"TCASE is the temperature measurement using a thermocouple embedded in the center of the heat spreader. This initial measurement is done at the factory. Post-manufacturing, TCASE is is calibrated by the BIOS, through a reading delivered by a diode between and below the cores."

"Tjunction Max is the maximum temperature the cores can reach before thermal throttling is activated."

http://www.intel.com/support/processors/sb/CS-033342.ht...

If you are still confused think about it like celcius and Fahrenheit measurements (AS AN EXAMPLE), where the Tcase is celcius (the lower number) and Fahrenheit is the Tjunction. These numbers are not on the same scale and therefore cannot be compared like you are.

That was what I was trying to say. Sorry if I wasn't clear. haha. Tcase is the temperature that is read from the diode in the CPU and the TJMax is when it throttles.
April 5, 2012 11:05:02 AM

Gigabyte MBs and CPUZ don't mix.
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April 6, 2012 12:02:01 AM

Sonny73N said:
Gigabyte MBs and CPUZ don't mix.

I don't think that is true. CPU-Z should work just fine on a Gigabyte board.
November 28, 2012 9:26:46 AM

i have the same problem,i cant find the vcore but i cant get it to boot if i let it on auto at 4.5
!