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Is my CPU voltage hungry

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  • CPUs
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
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March 18, 2012 5:05:28 PM

Hi,

I've been running my i5 2500K @ 4.5 GHz 1.35V stable for 6 months now, I now want to overclock even further, to 4.7 GHz.

And please don't come up with answers like: "No need to overclock your CPU any further... bla bla bla..." If I overclock further I have a good reason for it.

So, I tried 4.7 GHz on Offset voltage +0.020, which gave me 1.37V, gave me BSOD after 30 minutes of Prime95 with the 0x124 error. Then I put it on +0.030 giving me 1.38V, BSOD after 7 and a half hours with again the 0x124 error. I see that some people reach 4.7 GHz with only 1.31V! I don't know why. So, I need to increase the voltage, but it already seems a little high to me. Isn't my CPU a little voltage "hungry? So, before wasting more time, I was wondering, what's the next voltage I should try? 1.385, or 1.39? Btw, all other settings are, LLC Ultra High, Phase and Duty: Extreme. C1E Enabled to make EIST work, C3 and C6 disabled, Spread spectrum disabled, EPU power saving disabled, CPU PLL overvoltage enabled, CPU PLL voltage 1.9V, VCCIO voltage 1.1V, DRAM voltage 1.65. CPU current capability 130%.

Any other suggestions except for the VCore that I should change? I keep C1E enabled to make EIST kick in, for a longer lifespan of my CPU cuz I don't need 4.7 GHz while browsing the net!


Thanks in advance!

Arjen

More about : cpu voltage hungry

March 18, 2012 5:21:11 PM

Why not? With manual voltage I need at least 1.41V to get stable.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 24, 2012 3:44:14 PM

Welll....using offset voltage or a fixed setting really depends on your board. I have an ASRock P67 Extreme 4 board and offset works the best for me also, so you're ok there

You have to keep in mind that even the same model chip will have variations from chip to chip. Some chips might need 1.32v for it, some might need 1.38v, hell some might never be stable at 4.7

And you have to keep in mind that the higher you go, the larger jumps in voltage you'll need. My 2600K will do 4.4 ghz at stock which is around 1.275v I think, 4.5 @ around 1.29v, and 4.6 @ 1.32v. At 4.7, it was not even quite stable @ 1.355v and I jut kept it @ 4.6 since I don't see the need for a large voltage increase for a mere extra 100 mhz. But the point here is that you're probably pretty close to being stable. 1.385 or 1.39 will probably do it

But personally I'd just keep it @ 4.5 or even just go for 4.6. Trust me, you will notice zero difference
!