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HELP ASAP!!! PC shuts down but fans wont stop

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May 8, 2010 2:55:14 AM

Ok guys/gals I moved my system back home and wanted to upgrade my 90mm case fans to 120mm case fans. I also installed a spot cool fan. The computer ran great before i moved it and got home. I had to move my 8800GTS from pcie 1 to pcie 2 and had to install the video drivers for that again. Now my system will shut down (I hear the harddrives and cd drives turn off) but ALL the fans stay on. (never turn off no mater what length of time) I did re-seat the north bridge heatsink with new thermal paste. Quite the simple task and I dont believe I screwed it up. The computer does boot up and runs windows fine. (Windows XP Pro 64bit FRESH COPY installed yesterday)

"What I did" recap:
Re-seated the NB heatsink
Move 8800GTS form pcie1 to pcie2

Problem recap:
PC shuts down but fans stay running


Things I've done:
Re-installed XP pro 64
Moved 8800GTS back to pcie1
Checked everywhere for a short or unwanted connection
Cleared CMOS

Any help you can give would be GREATLY APPRECIATED! I will reply right as soon as I can. Thanks
__________________
Phenom II 940 x4
DFI LanParty DK 790FX B-M2RSH
1 TB Hd (Multiple HD's)
2 gb's OCZ Gold (667hz)
2 gb's Ultra (667hz)
8800GTS 320mb
Hiper 580watt psu
4 120mm Case Fans
w/ 3x thermaltake speed controls (pci) NEW
1 spot cool fan
Xigmatek HDT-S1283
a c 85 V Motherboard
May 8, 2010 8:40:28 AM

I don't remember exactly where the problem lies, but this problem did arise way back in the years or simple windows Xp and windows NT. There used to be registery problem with the shutdown command, something to do on the lines of a clean shut down.
What I'd like you to try is, if you have a live linux disc(SuSE preferably) Boot up the system using it and then shut it down and see if it shuts down.
If it does shut down completely, then you have no hardware problem , thats confirmed. And so you'll have to check the shutdown registry sequence in the windows registry.
On the other hand if it does not shutdown perfectly, then, it could be a hardware fault.
By the way, why did you move the 8800GTS to Pcie 2???? any particular reasons???
I would also suggest disconnecting the fans in the new case and try to see if a leak has sprung in the smps(PSU).
Try this and get back with the update.
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a c 156 V Motherboard
May 8, 2010 1:43:06 PM

I suspect the PSU is not shutting down properly.
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Related resources
May 8, 2010 1:59:30 PM

alyoshka said:
I don't remember exactly where the problem lies, but this problem did arise way back in the years or simple windows Xp and windows NT. There used to be registery problem with the shutdown command, something to do on the lines of a clean shut down.
What I'd like you to try is, if you have a live linux disc(SuSE preferably) Boot up the system using it and then shut it down and see if it shuts down.
If it does shut down completely, then you have no hardware problem , thats confirmed. And so you'll have to check the shutdown registry sequence in the windows registry.
On the other hand if it does not shutdown perfectly, then, it could be a hardware fault.
By the way, why did you move the 8800GTS to Pcie 2???? any particular reasons???
I would also suggest disconnecting the fans in the new case and try to see if a leak has sprung in the smps(PSU).
Try this and get back with the update.


I have access to every version of window from xp to 7, i do not have linux. I had windows 7 installed originally and then did a clean install of XP to try to correct my shutdown problem.

Everyone has asked why I moved the 8800 to pcie 2 like its a cardinal sin not to take it out of pcie 1. :pt1cable:  I moved it to allow for more space after installing a spot cool fan to cool my northbridge.

I have tried an entirely different PSU that I know works and had the same exact problem.

It cant be a hardware failure because the computer boots up to xp and works 100% no problems. It just doesnt shutdown all the way. It has to be a bios setting or something software related. I noticed when I had started it up, I had to reinstall the video driver. I am thinking that this may be caused by a video driver conflict. I am going to do a driver sweep and see what happens. Otherwise I am fresh out of ideas.

Thanks for the help and keep um coming.
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a c 85 V Motherboard
May 8, 2010 2:36:21 PM

When XP is first installed it tries to determine what type of BIOS is available on the computer. Newer systems have what is known as Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) capability. Unfortunately, XP doesn't always recognize a computer BIOS is ACPI capable and doesn't install the support for ACPI. Even more unfortunate is the fact that if ACPI support isn't determined at the initial install it's virtually impossible to correct this at a later time short of reinstalling XP over the top of the previous XP installation. To do so requires changing the Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL). The chances of successfully changing a HAL after XP has been installed is pretty close to zilch.
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a c 85 V Motherboard
May 8, 2010 2:37:03 PM

That's the main reason I asked if you have a Linux live boot disc, see, windows, from my experience, usually always ends up giving the same problem with it's different versions. And since we are not a part of the windows tech team, it's very difficult for us to decipher the abcdexxxx 1234abcdxx codes that it dishes out.
I'd still suggest downloading a live boot disc from the linux website, burning it to a disc and booting from it.

Moving the card is not a sin, but , again from our experience, it shows, that once a system is working perfectly with all things in their places, it's asking for trouble when we end up changing things.
And Yes it will ask you for drivers everytime you change slots, check with a USB stick, put it in one USB port (first time) and it'll it'll say" Install device", the next time you put it in the same one it doesn't say anything and the device is recognized, but try putting it into the other USB port, and it'll give you the message again " Installing device".
So yes, you will be asked for drivers since changing a slot from 1 to another means usually for a computer it's some new hardware (Plug and Play ) was never meant to be taken so literally......


Oops .... do you mean to say that you had this problem with the original install of Win7 too???
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a c 85 V Motherboard
May 8, 2010 3:14:04 PM

Well, here something else that'll solve the problem....... it's a quote, since it's too long a page and you'll probably find it difficult to find , I'm pasting it here.....

"POWERDOWN ISSUES

“Powerdown issues” are quite distinctive from “shutdown issues.” I define a shutdown problem as one wherein Windows doesn’t make it at least to the “OK to shut off your computer” screen. If Windows gets that far, or farther, then it has shut down correctly. However, the computer may not powerdown correctly after that. This is a different problem, and I encourage people reporting these issues to make a clear distinction in their labeling.

When Windows XP won’t powerdown automatically, the APM/NT Legacy Power Node may not be enabled. To enable this, right-click on the My Computer icon, click Properties | Hardware | Device Manager | View. Check the box labeled “Show Hidden Devices.” If it’s available on your computer, there will be a red X on the APM/NT Legacy Node. Try enabling it and see if this resolves the powerdown problem (Tip from Terri Stratton). Or, to check the other side of the APM/ACPI coin, open the Power Options applet in Control Panel. If there is an APM tab, make sure the “Enable Advanced Power Management Support” box is checked. (MSKB 313290)

This should resolve the powerdown issue in most cases. However, other factors can sometimes interfere with correct powerdown functioning. In that case, consider the following tips:

*
* Try some of the solutions on my Shutdown & Restart Shortcuts page. If you really have a hardware inability to powerdown, these won’t solve it; but for some other underlying causes of powerdown failures, they just might.

* If you change the default power settings in the BIOS, it can lead to a powerdown problem. Restoring all BIOS power settings to default will likely fix it. (Tip from Kelly Theriot)

* Sometimes, not all appropriate Registry settings are made when you enable all the right power management settings in Windows. You can force the critical Registry setting with the “ShutNTdown” Registry patch. Please follow sensible Registry editing protocol. Backup your Registry before the change (or run System Restore to create a restore point). After installing it, test Windows shutdown. If the fix doesn’t work for you, remove it by restoring the Registry to its prior state. (For those who want more background information, the fix provided by this patch is based on information contained in MS Knowledge Base article 155117 for Windows NT 4.0.)

* On some hardware, power management features simply don’t work right. This is exceedingly rare on Windows XP when compared to any earlier version of Windows but, on some machines, especially if no BIOS upgrade is available, there seems no conclusion to reach except, “Yes, you’re right, it doesn’t work, so don’t use that feature.” Accordingly, several correspondents have noted that their Win XP computers will not powerdown correctly unless they have Turn Off Monitor, Turn Off Hard Disks, and System Standby all set to “Never” in Control Panel | Power Options. (Tip from Dan Mitchell & others)

* How old is your power supply? Correspondent Andrew Walsh had a computer that wouldn’t power down after a Win XP shutdown until he replaced the power supply that was a few years old. Presto! His problem was gone.

* Correspondent “Snake” restored powerdown functioning by disabling his CD-ROM’s AutoRun feature. The fastest way to do this is with the “Disable AutoRun” Registry patch that you can download here.

* If you have Office XP installed, the culprit may be CTFMON.EXE. This module provides the Alternate Language Bar and provides text input service support for speech recognition, handwriting recognition, keyboard, translation, and other alternative user input technologies. When you close all Office programs, this module stays active. Removing it can cause serious problems with your Office XP products, but you can effectively disable it by setting the installation state to Not Available in Office XP Setup. This isn’t as easy as it sounds though — several steps are involved. For full instructions, plus more information on the file and its function, see What Is CTFMON and What Does It Do? (Tip from Jay Jones)

* VIA Apollo Pro 133 motherboards have a “USB Keyboard support” BIOS setting that can interfere with proper power management function if it is enabled — especially with respect to preventing powerdown during attempted shutdown, and also preventing the computer from waking from Stand-by. SOLUTION: Disable it. This was originally reported on the Chaintech 6ATA2, and confirmed on other VIA Apollo Pro 133 boards. (Tips from “Zef,” The Netherlands, & Robert Lin)

* Toshiba laptop (model not specified). Problems of Windows XP not powering off nor going into standyby were solved by uninstalling (then reinstalling) the Toshiba Power Saver software and Toshiba Hotkey for Display Devices. After doing this and a reboot, the problem was gone. (Tip from David Flitterman)"

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May 9, 2010 12:46:29 AM

Yes I believe the problem was also on windows 7 (64bit) I am going to go back to windows 7 since i know the computer worked fine on windows 7 before. I will post after ward what I find.

alyoshka!
You have been MORE THAN HELPFUL. I thank you very much. Check back for my update later tonight (5/8)
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May 10, 2010 5:43:23 AM

Update! I installed SuSE 11 (Linux) today and the same problem.
MY PROBLEM HAS TO BE IN THE BIOS!!!! or the mobo
I dont see how my mobo can be bad though. Works fine just wont shutdown. Anyway I still need help guys. Thanks
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a c 85 V Motherboard
May 10, 2010 7:23:41 AM

Download the latest BIOS from the company site and flash it.
Be very careful when you do this pls.
After that try the Live Linux disc without an OS......
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May 10, 2010 3:08:36 PM

Ok flashing will not be a problems as I did it the other day with no problems.
For the linux disc all I did was download SuSE and burn it to a disc. I had to go through an Install for about an hour will this work? If not could you point me to where I can get a "live" disc? Thanka
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May 10, 2010 5:36:07 PM

Update Alyoshka
I flashed with the latest bios. Everything went as planned
I then installed SuSE and went to shut down. The problem still exists. The fans continue to spin.

The problem is the motherboard I am 95% sure. Whether its with the bios or the board itself. Any other ideas? I can take pictures of anything (bios menus etc...) Just let me know. Thanks
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July 2, 2010 5:18:18 PM

a friend is having this problem with my old pc. shutting down with the power button on the case seems to shut everything down, but still same issue with using the windows shutdown command from the start menu.
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