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Will 4ghz shorten my cpu lifespan 8120

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March 21, 2012 10:16:10 PM

Will it? (at stock voltage or 1.22V, stock voltage is 1.1875

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March 21, 2012 10:36:25 PM

No, even at that voltage that cpu will outlast everything else in that build. A typical cpu remains functional long after it has become obsolete. Almost all of them are made with a 10 year life span but most have remained working for decades in old computers and satellites. The oldest and longest running cpu is in voyager 1 space probe which has been working non stop for over 30 years.

As for yours chances are that it will last all the same and you will have to push the voltage much higher to shorten the life span.
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March 21, 2012 10:42:03 PM

nforce4max said:
No, even at that voltage that cpu will outlast everything else in that build. A typical cpu remains functional long after it has become obsolete. Almost all of them are made with a 10 year life span but most have remained working for decades in old computers and satellites. The oldest and longest running cpu is in voyager 1 space probe which has been working non stop for over 30 years.

As for yours chances are that it will last all the same and you will have to push the voltage much higher to shorten the life span.

my motherboard says military class II and says it should last 10 years gaming use or 40 years office use so i know thats not going anywhere soon, what voltage shortens the lifespan to a noticable point like 1-2 years? if i put my cpu at 1.5V for 3 minutes does that do damage or is it when i put it at 1.5V for 5 years?
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March 21, 2012 10:47:51 PM

Boards usually don't last as long as the actual cpu unless they are kept clean or built very well. The drives, ram, and psu is likely to fail first then the board or graphics card. The typical life span of most computers is 6 years before they are to old to handle most modern applications or fail due to lack of maintenance. 8-10 years on the extreme end but for hobbyists, businesses ect have gotten over and up to 15 years before the drives or ram played out. Some people do have retro builds that are from the late 70s and early 80s from the early days. Most from those years fail due to aging power supplies and faulty ram.

You can just jump in the saddle and expect to know everything when it takes to time understand. Computing is no different and most these days don't even know what a 486 is or what the first router was.
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March 21, 2012 10:55:00 PM

nforce4max said:
Boards usually don't last as long as the actual cpu unless they are kept clean or built very well. The drives, ram, and psu is likely to fail first then the board or graphics card. The typical life span of most computers is 6 years before they are to old to handle most modern applications or fail due to lack of maintenance. 8-10 years on the extreme end but for hobbyists, businesses ect have gotten over and up to 15 years before the drives or ram played out. Some people do have retro builds that are from the late 70s and early 80s from the early days. Most from those years fail due to aging power supplies and faulty ram.

You can just jump in the saddle and expect to know everything when it takes to time understand. Computing is no different and most these days don't even know what a 486 is or what the first router was.

well can i get to 4ghz and oc my ram from stock 1600 to 1866 and set timings from 9 9 9 24 to like 6 6 6 24?
that should increase performance
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March 22, 2012 12:49:57 AM

melikepie said:
well can i get to 4ghz and oc my ram from stock 1600 to 1866 and set timings from 9 9 9 24 to like 6 6 6 24?
that should increase performance


well is your RAM made to work at those timings? your manufacturer is specific on what timings and voltages your ram can handle so just stick with what they tell you.
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March 22, 2012 1:47:35 AM

stickg1 said:
well is your RAM made to work at those timings? your manufacturer is specific on what timings and voltages your ram can handle so just stick with what they tell you.

no the stock is 1.65V 1600MHz 9 9 9 24 but the 2500k stock is 3.3GHz but people run it at 4.2GHz
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March 22, 2012 10:16:45 AM

melikepie said:
no the stock is 1.65V 1600MHz 9 9 9 24 but the 2500k stock is 3.3GHz but people run it at 4.2GHz


processors and ram are VERY different things. a processor might come stock at 3.3ghz, what that means is that every single chip they produced on that line can be put in any system and run at 3.3ghz no problems at all. a lot of chips have a higher potential then that and this is why some are able to significantly overclock their chip. RAM, not so much, I would stick with the manufacturer settings. That does not mean that what your BIOS auto set your RAM to is manufacturer settings, so find the make and model of your ram, go to the manufacturer's website and see what they say to run it at. If it is made to operate at 1600mhz, you might be able to squeeze 1650 out of it, but definately not 1866. If you're runnings DDR3 RAM then I highly doubt your ram will support 6-6-6-24. Plus, the latency of the ram (the first 6) is the time it takes the ram to initially start in milliseconds. From that point on the RAM will work at the frequency you have it set at.
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March 23, 2012 12:09:14 PM

melikepie said:
Will it? (at stock voltage or 1.22V, stock voltage is 1.1875



NO! for as long as you have a CPU cooler to cool down the CPU
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March 23, 2012 4:56:16 PM

melikepie said:
Will it? (at stock voltage or 1.22V, stock voltage is 1.1875

The funny thing is that the STOCK turbo is 4.0 ghz at 1.41V. Running 4.0 ghz at 1.22V is actually considerably better than stock, so at that, there is 0 chance of damaging the cpu.

Ram speed and timings are very well tested before put on the shelves. chances are you can get a little bit better out of the chip, but usually no more than -1 on the timings and increasing the speed usually have to add 1 to the timings. Ram overclocking can be very tricky.
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March 30, 2012 5:29:36 AM

Best answer selected by melikepie.
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