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Compatibility Check! ASAP!

Last response: in Systems
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November 8, 2009 1:07:31 AM

Thanks to everyone who helped me with any questions I had, and helped me choose parts. Now I just need to know if these things will work together well (also, will the power supply power it all?):



HIS H575F1GDG Radeon HD 5750 1GB 128-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFire Supported Video Card - Retail $144.99

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL - Retail $90.99

ASUS P7P55 LX LGA 1156 Intel P55 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail $119.99

COMBO: Antec Nine Hundred Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case - Retail AND Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 1-Pack for System Builders - OEM $186.98

COMBO: Intel Core i7-860 Lynnfield 2.8GHz LGA 1156 95W Quad-Core Processor Model BX80605I7860 - Retail AND G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL - Retail $370.98

T13-1115 :: Coolmax CU-700B Power Supply - 700-Watt (from CompUSA.com, not newegg.com like all the others) $49.99 (after MIR)

TOTAL: $963.92


If you have any additions or substitutions (or thoughts in general), please let me know ASAP. I plan on ordering these items tonight!
November 8, 2009 3:06:15 PM

I wouldn't need 8GB of RAM? Even if I am either doing lots of video editing or playing graphics intense games?

And the real reason I had chosen the Coolermax was because it was significantly cheaper. I'm trying to keep it as far down as possible. What would be a good wattage to use for this system, anyway? I was just making a guess at 700.
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November 8, 2009 3:15:20 PM

Lots of video editing might justify it, but 4 should do the job nicely. Gaming doesn't need 4 and won't need 4 anytime soon.

A 500-600W PSU will be more than needed.

For gaming, an intel i5-750 is plenty, for photo editing it will do as well.

However, you put an uberweak GPU in a system with very powerful other parts. Use the money saved in the above steps to get a better graphics card, a 5850 would be great. A fast CPU and big RAM memory mean nothing when they're not paired with a good GPU, especially in gaming where the GPU is by far the most important component.
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November 8, 2009 3:31:47 PM

would this be an acceptable psu?
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

also, the 5850 is VERY expensive. the ones I saw on newegg were $300. that poses a problem for my budget, especially because i still have yet to get a monitor (also, I am coming from an old system, with a gForce 7600 in it, so pretty much anything will be an improvement)
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November 8, 2009 3:55:35 PM

It certainly would be a nice PSU.

Yes, it's highly expensive. That's why I'd recommend to cut on parts that are stronger than needed (CPU, PSU) to get some budget set free. If a 5850 is out of reach, you can always go for a 5770 rather than a 5750, that's not that much of a price increase. Later on, when more budget becomes available, you can add another 5770 in crossfire for a nice performance boost.
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November 8, 2009 6:44:22 PM

While games are important to me, I really am looking forward to having the hyperthreading technology with the i7 instead of the i5 (I did quite a bit of research whilest deciding). Being a student, I often have multiple programs open at once, many of them very processor and memory intensive. I think that I will take off the second set of RAM, and if I need it later on, I can always get more. Even the 5770 seems a bit pricey, but I might go with it, now that I have switched from a motherboard with usb 3.0 to a cheaper on without, and dropped the second memory set. I still need to get a good monitory, otherwise my new gpu wont do me any good, so it mostly depends on that.
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November 8, 2009 6:48:43 PM

No, don't get the BP PSU.

See the form in my sig, and it will be easier to help you out.
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