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Fan spins for a sec, then quits

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November 9, 2009 7:07:48 AM

Hello, I have a homebuilt PC with:

EVGA e-7050/610i GeForce Socket 775 Motherboard
Intel Pentium D 965 Extreme 3.73Ghz Socket 775 CPU
GeForce 9600GT PCI-e videocard
Rocketfish 550W continuous PSU

It was running fine for about 8 months then one day, playing Sims 3 the damn thing just went out as if the plug were pulled.

Since then, it has been behaving just like THIS GUYS COMPUTER WAS.

Basically, it wont boot. When I hit the power button, the fan spins for less than a second, and I can see the PSU's LEDs flash then it immediately plays dead again. I can hold the power button for 10 seconds and it will let me repeat this process to no avail.

I have done just about everything I know. Bought a new (better) PSU and tried that: fail. Checked the MOBO risers for anything loose: nothing. Completely removed, reseated, unplugged absolutely everything and put it back (including the CPU with fresh heatsinkfluid) and still get the same response.

I'm starting to fear that the MOBO is dead, but I don't see any damage, and want to know if there is any way I can verify it is functioning, or if someone out there knows what I can do to fix it.

In the mean time, I'm sharing my girlfriends computer, and she doesn't like it. Help me please!
~Wizdro

More about : fan spins sec quits

November 9, 2009 9:26:14 AM

Thank you, but I have exhausted that list and more. Any more ideas?

Here is something else I thought relevant, but am not entirely sure: my CPU fan is a 3-pin although the MOBO has 4 pins. I've been simply plugging it on the first 3 so it runs 100%. I didn't give me problems, so I didn't think much of it. Just thought it might have relevancy.

Having tried reseating the CPU, cooler, the MOBO, all the power terminals and connections, running it with nothing but the essential parts, and trying all variations with a Corsair 650W PSU as well, I am pulling my hair out.

At this point, I an considering sending the MOBO in for checkup/replacement because it is 6 months away from the end of its warranty.

Full Hardware List:

- EVGA e-7050/610i GeForce Socket 775 Motherboard
- Intel Pentium D 965 Extreme 3.73Ghz Socket 775 CPU
- XFX GeForce 9600GT 512MB PCI-e videocard
- Rocketfish 550W continuous PSU
- Thermaltake CL-P0441 CPU cooler
- Apex SK-393 ATX Black Mid-T Case
- Western Digital Caviar SE16MB 320GB 7200 SATA-300 OEM Hard Drive
- Some old, crappy IDE-cable-using DVD drive I pulled from my old PC
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November 9, 2009 10:23:38 AM

I had the same problem pulling out the BIOS battery for more than a minute and then putting it back in fixed it. I think in my case the motherboard (new one) was confused with what I "gave" it... i.e. CPU, memory, graphics card. I assume you have checked or know for sure that all other components work.
November 9, 2009 8:28:42 PM

I did reseat the BIOS battery to potentially reset the CMOS, but nothing changed.

Yes, I know all the components work, they were working fine for 6+ months with no acting up of any kind.

Besides, I have also tried running it completely bare-bones with only the MOBO and HD and get the same behavior. The number of peripherals attached doesn't seem to affect the behavior.
a b B Homebuilt system
November 9, 2009 8:50:47 PM

Pull all but 1 stick of RAM.
Unmount the HSF and CPU. Reapply thermal paste and reconnect the HSF and CPU.
Tie up and secure all loose cables. You could be shorting on the chasis.
a b B Homebuilt system
November 9, 2009 9:43:11 PM

I had a computer behave almost exactly the same way once, and of all the things it could've been, it turned out to be (drumroll) ....

a faulty power switch.

That's right, the power switch on the case itself just went bad, suddenly and completely out of the blue. I tried disconnecting the power switch from the motherboard and just connecting the reset button to the pins where the power button used to go, and then it worked fine using the reset button as a power switch.

This is obviously a shot in the dark, and probably a pretty rare problem, but maybe worth a look before you go throwing away components.
November 10, 2009 8:50:25 AM

I also assumed that you tested the MB bare outside the case with only 1 memory module the CPU and a graphics card (if not built in). HDs are not necessary to start the POST sequence.

Here is my recent experience regarding constant reboots with the same type of motherboard:

a) My dead motherboard (GA-X48-DQ6) would continuously reboot just prior to displaying the message "Verifying DMI Pool Data...". This one I returned to the retailer to be replaced. I tested it so extensively that I'm 99.9% sure it had a serious fault. The fault was caused most probably by a lightning strike that hit a nearby building.

b) As I couldn't wait for the replacement board mentioned in (a) I bought the same motherboard as mentioned above and installed all components on it. It kept on rebooting withing two or three secons of being turned on. Only the CPU and PSU fans would trun for a bit and then it would reboot. Remember this was a new motherboard. Initially I thought that I did have a problem with some of my components so I had to do an exhausting test again. Eventually the problem got fixed by removing the BIOS battery for a minute or two. I also had to update my BIOS to make sure that my CPU was recognised by the MB. The original BIOS wouldn't recognise my CPU.

This is a long shot and might not apply at all to your problem but did you at any stage update the BIOS and CPU? Could it be that your MB reverted to the original BIOS (is it possible?) and that the original BIOS is not recognising your CPU?

November 12, 2009 6:39:05 PM

Ive had a PC do that recently I had repaired (my partners friends PC) and cleaning out all the dust and redoing the paste on the heatsink for CPU which was all fried and dried out and everything is now OK.
November 22, 2009 2:21:38 AM

I learned an interesting trouble-shooting trick. Working out of the case on cardboard (to rule out case-shorting), I plugged in ~only~ the motherboards 24-pin power ~without~ plugging in the 8/4-pin power to the CPU. The system successfully turned on.

This isolated the problem to either the MOBO's CPU voltage-controller or the CPU itself as the culprit. By swapping out my CPU for another working one, I can know for sure what is the culprit.

I didn't have any compatible CPUs lying around, and I was already working on building a second PC so I will be able to test it in a week when the shipment gets to my door.
September 30, 2011 3:29:29 AM

Did you ever get this figured out? My identical HW just did the exact same thing and I'm wondering what part you ended up replacing?

- EVGA e-7050/610i GeForce Socket 775 Motherboard
- Intel Pentium D 965 Extreme 3.73Ghz Socket 775 CPU
- Apex SK-393 ATX Black Mid-T Case

When testing another Power Supply, I noticed that one fan briefly surged just a fraction of a millimeter and I could hear a buzz of some sort, but I suspect there might be a problem with the power button itself?!?
October 19, 2011 12:16:04 AM

madafles34 said:
Did you ever get this figured out? My identical HW just did the exact same thing and I'm wondering what part you ended up replacing?

- EVGA e-7050/610i GeForce Socket 775 Motherboard
- Intel Pentium D 965 Extreme 3.73Ghz Socket 775 CPU
- Apex SK-393 ATX Black Mid-T Case

When testing another Power Supply, I noticed that one fan briefly surged just a fraction of a millimeter and I could hear a buzz of some sort, but I suspect there might be a problem with the power button itself?!?


OP here. I forgot to come back and update my situation.

It was the CPU voltage controller. The MOBO was bad. Get an RMA if its still under warranty or just buy a whole new motherboard. My CPU was fine and is still working strong. If at all possible, get a matching motherboard and use the old CPU. Good luck!

~wizdro

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October 19, 2011 1:05:12 AM
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wizdro said:
OP here. I forgot to come back and update my situation.

It was the CPU voltage controller. The MOBO was bad. Get an RMA if its still under warranty or just buy a whole new motherboard. My CPU was fine and is still working strong. If at all possible, get a matching motherboard and use the old CPU. Good luck!

~wizdro


Thanks for confirming, Wizdro.

I can double confirm that my EVGA e-7050/610i GeForce Socket 775 Motherboard also had a flaky CPU voltage controller.

Just replaced it with a similar MB (unfortunately it was out of warranty and I couldn't find an identical MB online in order to save my OS install) and am in the process of reinstalling Windows from scratch with all the original components migrated to a brand new and stable MSI G31TM-P21 Motherboard which I picked up at http://www.compusa.com/applications/searchtools/item-de....
November 10, 2011 12:14:13 AM

Best answer selected by wizdro.
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