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Why cant I run Mac OS X and Windows XP off same ethernet hub?

Last response: in Networking
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November 17, 2009 10:47:13 PM

I have high speed internet. I can hook up my Mac (OS X, Leopard) to the internet and all goes fines. When I plug in my PC (Windows XP Professional) to the ethernet hub though, the Mac goes down.
If I dump the Mac off the hub, the PC is connected.

What's up?
Anonymous
November 18, 2009 9:00:15 AM

Are you sure you don't need a router instead of a hub?
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November 18, 2009 6:24:09 PM

My thought too. What is the internet source and how does it connect to the network?
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November 18, 2009 7:36:51 PM

pagen said:
I have high speed internet. I can hook up my Mac (OS X, Leopard) to the internet and all goes fines. When I plug in my PC (Windows XP Professional) to the ethernet hub though, the Mac goes down.
If I dump the Mac off the hub, the PC is connected.

What's up?


There can be a few reasons for this...
The first thing I would do is try another Hub or Switch. Dump the hub and go with a switch, unless you're sniffing traffic, and if you are sniffing traffic, then buy a switch that will allow you to port mirror. Hubs are inefficient and slow down traffic because they don't prevent CSMA/CD Collisions. A layman explaination of CSMA/CD can be found HERE. and a real in-depth explanation can be found HERE, but be prepared to put on your black Buddy Holly glasses with the tape on them before you read that one.

Being a TCP/IP geek, I would love to see a packet sniff of that activity just before the OS X machine take a network heart attack.
-Is the device a Hub or a switch?
-What model of hub or switch is it.
-is the OS X machine running appletalk? to my knowledge it is not on by default (a very chatty protocol, and in a hub environment -- Fahgettabout it! --
-Is there a DHCP or static IP conflict (check the PC Event logs and the on the Mac, open a terminal up and cd into the /var/log do an ls command to see the contents, and you can read the logs by doing a cat (logname) |more
The |more will give you a screen of information and each press of the enter key will give you another line
If you haven't reached the end of a line and want to quit out of the file just press q
type exit to close the terminal

Let me know what you find.
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November 26, 2009 2:26:04 PM

Quote:
Are you sure you don't need a router instead of a hub?


Grumpy9117/karlh-No I'm not sure if I need a router or a hub. My setup has the high speed line coming into the house and connecting to the cable companies modem. From there, it goes into an ethernet hub so that I could also hook-up the ethernet line for the printer, and I thought, multiple ethernet lines so that each computer had access to the internet. I have a router, but it is not in the mix because frankly, I don't know it's purpose.
If I want to access the internet on the PC, I have to cycle the modem on and off and I regain my connectivity. If later I want to get on the Mac and use the internet, I have to shut down the PC, cycle the modem a couple of times and then the Mac is operational. My limited knowledge of all of this makes me think that each computer has a different "address" and they cannot coexist. Would a router obviate the cycling of the modem?
ntadmin101-Appreciate the advice, but have no idea what I'd be looking at with your information. I am the classic, "turn it on and cross my fingers it works" computer gal. My business partner told me years ago that I should actually LEARN how the computer works...I didn't take his advice. I am a carpenter. I can build the desk for the machine, but I'm not much on the mechanics of the system. I cracked up reading your note, because it's a language I just don't speak.
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November 26, 2009 2:40:57 PM

Some modems serve as routers, some don't. I learned it the hard way.
The first thing I'd say is that both your computers share the same IP address, but I doubt it because it would give you a warning an you don't mention it.
If your modem is only a modem, it will need a router afterwards to split the info among many computers. That's the only way.
There's cheap routers on the market. The difference with a hub (or a switch) is that they have sort of an "IN" port and some "OUT" ports and even a Wifi one. Your modem should go to the "IN" (or WAN) port and the computers to the "OUT" (LAN) ports.
A hub will only work if the modem has a router built-in so that it can tell one computer's data from the other's.
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November 30, 2009 1:37:19 PM

pagen said:
Grumpy9117/karlh-No I'm not sure if I need a router or a hub. My setup has the high speed line coming into the house and connecting to the cable companies modem. From there, it goes into an ethernet hub so that I could also hook-up the ethernet line for the printer, and I thought, multiple ethernet lines so that each computer had access to the internet. I have a router, but it is not in the mix because frankly, I don't know it's purpose.
If I want to access the internet on the PC, I have to cycle the modem on and off and I regain my connectivity. If later I want to get on the Mac and use the internet, I have to shut down the PC, cycle the modem a couple of times and then the Mac is operational. My limited knowledge of all of this makes me think that each computer has a different "address" and they cannot coexist. Would a router obviate the cycling of the modem?
ntadmin101-Appreciate the advice, but have no idea what I'd be looking at with your information. I am the classic, "turn it on and cross my fingers it works" computer gal. My business partner told me years ago that I should actually LEARN how the computer works...I didn't take his advice. I am a carpenter. I can build the desk for the machine, but I'm not much on the mechanics of the system. I cracked up reading your note, because it's a language I just don't speak.


Pagen, You will need to deploy that router. The router's purpose it to separate networks. It sounds like your second machine is requesting an IP address from your internet provider, which is currently held by the first, and therefore a conflict arises. Your router is more than likely capable of handing out a new set of addresses, so your setup should go something like this.

Cable Companies line in to Cable Companies Modem --> Ethernet from cable companies modem to your WAN port on your router --> Your computers plugged into the LAN ports of the router. That should do it. If you have any issues with the router, then give me the model number and I'll help you through it. Sorry for the geek speak in the earlier post. I sometimes assume that people know what I'm talking about. PS: I'm a carpenter too [:jaydeejohn:8]
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December 1, 2009 2:03:13 AM

A hub? Sounds like you have a modem connected and the modem only gives out one IP address. You will need a router to deal with this issue, or a PC with two Network cards set up as a DHCP server.
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