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New WC Loop

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March 30, 2012 6:17:13 PM

Hello everyone, I am looking for ideas and guidance on my 1st WC loop all suggestions are greatly appreciated. With that said I am looking to dive into a custom water cooling loop and my 1st thing is to decide on a case. My budget will be around $400-$500 for the loop itself. Quality parts are my main concern, it does not matter if I have to wait to get a 2nd rad and the GPU or CPU block down the line.

Case:
White in color (gonna go with a black and white theme) I will consider painting as well if there is a quality case that is not available in white, but my resources limit me to probaly spray paint, no air brush gun for me :( 
Be able to include all components internally (modding is expected, and looked forward too) :) 
I have this one in mind right now http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I am planning the loop around a 2500k and a 580, with researching I have found that a 580 pushes 173-452w and the 2500k will do around 74-128w(stock) I could not really find what one does off of a 4.5-5.0Ghz OC.

Pump:
MCP655 I chose this pump in accordance with http://www.overclock.net/t/1108918/what-can-my-pump-han... my overall system according to that will require 3.7 PSI to achive a 1GPM+ flow rate and the 655 has a 4.72PSI rating.

CPU block:
I have been looking at the EK Supreme HF Full Nickel and Watercool Heatkiller 3.0, both I have seen are top performers, and look pleasing to the eye :D  both are pretty pricey though, and that leads me to wonder the actual price to performance of CPU blocks. If they are worth it, by all means bring em on!

Radiator(s):
I like the Aquacomputer airplex Revolution Skinnees review has stated "The Airplex Revo with AP15′s at 1200RPM is capable of dissipating over 400 watts at a 10C delta which very impressive". I would like to keep a 10C to 12C delta, and in order to do 2500k and 580 I will need two of these or something with similar performance to have headroom for OC'ing. Another radiator I came across was the Black Ice SR1 which is also a low FPI keeping noise down

GPU:
As far as these come along I am in a toss up, full cover vs uni. Universal sounds great for upgrade-ability (cheaper in the long run for sure) but I am concerned on the idea of ram sinks VS the ease of a full cover. Which perform better is my main question?

Reservoir:
Nothing special here, I do like how Digital storms have that clear cylinder that looks like its bubbling. I would like the res to add some aesthetic value but not a necessity.

Well that is all I have so far, all information is greatly appreciated!
Please, and Thanks!
-MF

More about : loop

a c 190 K Overclocking
March 31, 2012 7:16:27 PM

I can point you to the sticky up top if you've not read it already, but to answer a couple of your points,

http://www.scan.co.uk/products/inwin-dragon-rider-white... Mods like a beast and is already white for you :p 

I can't find any solid numbers for the 4.5GHz, but would suggest 200w as a guideline figure until someone with better knowledge can pipe in :) 
**Edit, using http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/ can give you your Cpu wattage requirement, 4500MHz at 1.3v draws 110w so that may be a number to calculate from.

Pump is a good choice,
Cpu block, try to avoid nickel plated stuff from EK, and check out the XSpc Raystorm as an alternative, its one of the top blocks right now.
Gpu block, I would say universal and ramsinks for the future use route
Rad, you don't state the size you are looking at on that review, I'm guessing its a 360/480 though
You can get the Ex series from Xspc over there now and they are also low fan monsters,
Reservoir, if you want a pretty res check out FrozenQ's site, I have two of his T-Virus resses and they're shiny :p 

Will check back later,
Moto

a b K Overclocking
April 1, 2012 1:03:42 AM

Tagging this for later when I have more time...
Related resources
a b K Overclocking
April 1, 2012 9:44:28 PM

here are the issues that I have run into(long time water cooling enthusiast myself) don't worry about cerotic corrosion wetter water prevents it. the tubing will get hard after a couple of years (I switched to chimerical resistant tubing eventually, I did not like the price.) but it's been six years no problems, not even starting to get hard. as well get a flow meter, one with a window and propeller. this will let you know when the pump starts to go. they will usually slow down, before they stop complete( depending on the manufacture 3 to 5 years) the pump you plan to have I have as well, I like swiftech. the first one I ever owned only lasted 3 years, so I bought from a different company, got 2 years out of it. went back to swiftech, now I get a solid 5 years out of their products, when it comes to pumps. I have blocks from them 13 years old still use them even if not for their intended purpose. I like to experiment, so I have used their old processor blocks to try and extend the life of the cd rom, by applying it to the bottom of it and hopefully cooling it down, never hurts to try, right.
a b K Overclocking
April 2, 2012 5:05:55 PM

Welcome. As Moto said, reading the sticky will be your best way to start out here, though it sounds like you've done a good bit of research.

Quote:
Pump:
MCP655 I chose this pump in accordance with http://www.overclock.net/t/1108918/what-can-my-pump-han... my overall system according to that will require 3.7 PSI to achive a 1GPM+ flow rate and the 655 has a 4.72PSI rating.

The MCP35X is also a good pump - it'll give you slightly better pressure heads than the 655, but that said I and a few others are all running MCP655s without issue in our loops (CPU/multi-GPU/multi-rad).

Quote:
CPU block:
I have been looking at the EK Supreme HF Full Nickel and Watercool Heatkiller 3.0, both I have seen are top performers, and look pleasing to the eye :D  both are pretty pricey though, and that leads me to wonder the actual price to performance of CPU blocks. If they are worth it, by all means bring em on!

I would stay away from EK's nickel blocks (coppers are fine). I had a nickel plated GPU block and am overall not too pleased with EK. If you want to know more go to the last post: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/266834-29-before-nick...

You have a lot of good choices for CPU blocks. EK Supreme HF Full Copper, Heatkiller, XSPC Raystorm, etc. Do some reading and pick one that you like and that meets your financial restrictions. In a good systems they're all within a few degrees of each other.

Quote:
Radiator(s):
I like the Aquacomputer airplex Revolution Skinnees review has stated "The Airplex Revo with AP15′s at 1200RPM is capable of dissipating over 400 watts at a 10C delta which very impressive". I would like to keep a 10C to 12C delta, and in order to do 2500k and 580 I will need two of these or something with similar performance to have headroom for OC'ing. Another radiator I came across was the Black Ice SR1 which is also a low FPI keeping noise down

XSPC's rads are also great, and generally more economical. Their RX rads are great, but the EX rads are similar in performance but thinner. The RS rads aren't really going to give you what you need from this loop - they're just not right for this loop.

Quote:
GPU:
As far as these come along I am in a toss up, full cover vs uni. Universal sounds great for upgrade-ability (cheaper in the long run for sure) but I am concerned on the idea of ram sinks VS the ease of a full cover. Which perform better is my main question?

I switched from EK FC blocks to uni block and have to say there isn't much of a difference. I get roughly the same temps in a single GPU system, and I like the fact that I can upgrade more easily (I tend to upgrade every 6-12 months). Sure full cover blocks are nice, but they're pricey if you like to shuffle hardware every once in a while.

If you want to get really nit-picky, I think the FC blocks perform 1-2C better on average.
a c 324 K Overclocking
April 2, 2012 5:17:30 PM

AquaComputer rads are a little more restrictive than most US radiators as Europe typically works on a smaller diameter, more head pressure, lower flow rate system than the US, which is larger diameter, lower head, higher flow rates. Either way, I don't think it's a big deal, regardless, just know it will add a little more restriction to your loop over a 'US styled' rad.
a b K Overclocking
April 2, 2012 9:24:41 PM

MetalFluff said:
Hello everyone, I am looking for ideas and guidance on my 1st WC loop all suggestions are greatly appreciated. With that said I am looking to dive into a custom water cooling loop and my 1st thing is to decide on a case. My budget will be around $400-$500 for the loop itself. Quality parts are my main concern, it does not matter if I have to wait to get a 2nd rad and the GPU or CPU block down the line.

Case:
White in color (gonna go with a black and white theme) I will consider painting as well if there is a quality case that is not available in white, but my resources limit me to probaly spray paint, no air brush gun for me :( 
Be able to include all components internally (modding is expected, and looked forward too) :) 
I have this one in mind right now http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I am planning the loop around a 2500k and a 580, with researching I have found that a 580 pushes 173-452w and the 2500k will do around 74-128w(stock) I could not really find what one does off of a 4.5-5.0Ghz OC.

Pump:
MCP655 I chose this pump in accordance with http://www.overclock.net/t/1108918/what-can-my-pump-han... my overall system according to that will require 3.7 PSI to achive a 1GPM+ flow rate and the 655 has a 4.72PSI rating.

CPU block:
I have been looking at the EK Supreme HF Full Nickel and Watercool Heatkiller 3.0, both I have seen are top performers, and look pleasing to the eye :D  both are pretty pricey though, and that leads me to wonder the actual price to performance of CPU blocks. If they are worth it, by all means bring em on!

Radiator(s):
I like the Aquacomputer airplex Revolution Skinnees review has stated "The Airplex Revo with AP15′s at 1200RPM is capable of dissipating over 400 watts at a 10C delta which very impressive". I would like to keep a 10C to 12C delta, and in order to do 2500k and 580 I will need two of these or something with similar performance to have headroom for OC'ing. Another radiator I came across was the Black Ice SR1 which is also a low FPI keeping noise down

GPU:
As far as these come along I am in a toss up, full cover vs uni. Universal sounds great for upgrade-ability (cheaper in the long run for sure) but I am concerned on the idea of ram sinks VS the ease of a full cover. Which perform better is my main question?

Reservoir:
Nothing special here, I do like how Digital storms have that clear cylinder that looks like its bubbling. I would like the res to add some aesthetic value but not a necessity.

Well that is all I have so far, all information is greatly appreciated!
Please, and Thanks!
-MF


I like swiftech, for blocks, radiators, and pumps. the black ice if space is an issue for the radiators. I do not like barb fittings, even for line converters. compression fitting all the way, less issues to deal with but they are more expensive, but it's not like this is cheap to begin with. I also like the bits power multi tank z 240 and up reservoirs, they not only look nice but have a lot of different positions that you can mount them in because of the design
a b K Overclocking
April 2, 2012 10:14:12 PM

Quote:
I like swiftech, for blocks, radiators, and pumps.

While Swiftech is good all around, there are many other great products that can be had for similar or less when you consider the performance aspect (not just cost).

Quote:
I do not like barb fittings, even for line converters. compression fitting all the way, less issues to deal with but they are more expensive, but it's not like this is cheap to begin with.

Compression fittings being 'easier to deal with' is not necessarily true - in many instances barbs are easier and/or the only way to go (my 1/2 ID 3/4 OD comps don't fit on any universal GPU block, so I had to use 1/2 ID barbs and clamps. I've also had to use a pair of pliers to loosen my fittings since they need to be extra tight, and that definitely ruins the finish on most.

Sure, compression fittings look cleaner, but it doesn't mean that they're necessarily better/less painful/safer than barbs. Arguably, barbs are easier since you just put the tubing on and use a clamp (which are generally easier to remove).

April 2, 2012 10:36:51 PM

Hey guys thanks for all of the info so far I work out of town so I will give a proper reply and check out all the items listed this weekend when I get to my computer
-MF
a c 324 K Overclocking
April 3, 2012 1:58:06 AM

Quote:
Compression fittings being 'easier to deal with' is not necessarily true - in many instances barbs are easier and/or the only way to go (my 1/2 ID 3/4 OD comps don't fit on any universal GPU block, so I had to use 1/2 ID barbs and clamps. I've also had to use a pair of pliers to loosen my fittings since they need to be extra tight, and that definitely ruins the finish on most.

Sure, compression fittings look cleaner, but it doesn't mean that they're necessarily better/less painful/safer than barbs. Arguably, barbs are easier since you just put the tubing on and use a clamp (which are generally easier to remove).


I definitely agree with using compressions with universal blocks as they may not fit. Barbs are similar to compression fittings...in fact both actually are barbs in a sense...it's a matter of the clamping system. A compression fitting has the threaded seal fitting and a barb needs a clamp of some sort that is separate from the fitting.
!