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Clone partition to SSD?

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October 7, 2011 2:47:55 AM

I'm considering buying a new SSD, because I could always use faster speed to boot up Windows and load programs and such. I'd like to keep my old OS partition intact but I'm not sure what kind of performance hit would I suffer from cloning my partition to SSD?

Is it worth getting an SSD in light of this or is it just better to start over fresh?

My Specs are:

Acer Aspire x3200 w/ AMD Phenom X3 (TripleCore) 8400 2.1 GHz (Stock speed & HS)
4 GB G·Skill DDR2 800 PC2-6400
Onboard NVidia GeForce 8200/9200
Asus Xonar DX
WD 500GB (30 GB OS partition w/ 9 GBs free space)
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 Build 7600

More about : clone partition ssd

a b G Storage
October 7, 2011 11:56:58 AM

You won't suffer a performance hit after a clone if you use the right cloning software and check if everything went of okay with other software. Although it's always nice to have a clean install no doubt about that.
If you are like me, then why give chance a chance, leave no room for any doubt.
Clean install windows with AHCI on and you'll see a world of a difference.
October 7, 2011 12:26:23 PM

Indeed, clean install in AHCI will be a big improvement.
I went from a 74gb Raptor to a OC SSD, changed from IDE compatibility mode to AHCI and BAM, almost insta-boot :) 
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October 8, 2011 6:06:25 AM

Is there a way to change to AHCI without formatting?
a b G Storage
October 8, 2011 9:13:33 AM

Yup, through the windows registry and through the BIOS after that.

You can read on how to do it here.
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976
Some more info is available here.
http://www.eggheadcafe.com/microsoft/Windows-Vista-Hard...
http://forums.pcper.com/showthread.php?t=444831&page=2

And if you don't want to go there
Here are the steps
1. Exit all Windows-based programs.
2. Click Start, type regedit in the Start Search box, and then press ENTER.
3. If you receive the User Account Control dialog box, click Continue.
4. Locate and then click the following registry subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Msahci
5. In the right pane, right-click Start in the Name column, and then click Modify.
6. In the Value data box, type 0, and then click OK.
7. On the File menu, click Exit to close Registry Editor.
October 9, 2011 6:33:02 PM

alyoshka said:
Yup, through the windows registry and through the BIOS after that.

You can read on how to do it here.
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976
Some more info is available here.
http://www.eggheadcafe.com/microsoft/Windows-Vista-Hard...
http://forums.pcper.com/showthread.php?t=444831&page=2

And if you don't want to go there
Here are the steps
1. Exit all Windows-based programs.
2. Click Start, type regedit in the Start Search box, and then press ENTER.
3. If you receive the User Account Control dialog box, click Continue.
4. Locate and then click the following registry subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Msahci
5. In the right pane, right-click Start in the Name column, and then click Modify.
6. In the Value data box, type 0, and then click OK.
7. On the File menu, click Exit to close Registry Editor.

Cool!
October 9, 2011 6:33:32 PM

I was thinking of getting a couple of Kingston 32GB V something series or just one Crucial M4 64GB.

Guys do you think a Crucial M4 64GB SSD would go on sale on BF for under $90?

Also, would either of these be a significant effective upgrade for a given computer that is dependent upon the performance bottlenecks for my computer? i.e. CPU, RAM, BIOS, OS, AHCI, Trim, hibernation, page file, defragmentation, etc

Moreover, I still have a sata II board, would a Crucial M4 be a waste of money? Should I go for a sata II ssd like a kingston? TIA
a b G Storage
October 9, 2011 6:40:27 PM

I'm using a 80GB Intel SATAII SSD on my rig and it's not got bottleneck issues anywhere with any other parts of the rig. And one thing I must say is, 80GB ain't enough for me even though I just have the OS, MSO, Photoshop as the largest programs on the rig, there must be a hundred smaller, really smaller programs on it too. But none of the games I play are on it, my pagefile is not on it and there is just about 20GB of space that is left on it. I would really suggest go for atleast 120GB, because usable is going to be about a 100GB only.
And that would be pretty ok since you can have 40% Free space.
October 9, 2011 7:08:25 PM

Should I get 120GB even though my current 30GB partition has had over 9 GB freespace for over a year?

This is the reason why I started off asking about the 64GB. It would seem to be that 64GB is enough but what kind of stuff would I have to install to require 120GB? Or does the size of information automatically increase on the SSD?

The only other program I would think at those moment that I would install is Photoshop and After Effects.
a b G Storage
October 10, 2011 7:13:07 AM

Windows has a lot of updates through out the year, they keep increasing the size of the OS occupied space. If you feel 64GB is going to be ample for you since 30GB was more than enough, then you can go for the 64GB with closed eyes.
No, size of information does not automatically increase on an SSD or any other medium as a matter of fact. So a program occupying 20GB on a HDD is going to occupy 20GB on a SSD, BRDVD, pendrive , tape drive, etc etc. there will be no change.
My Photoshop CS4 takes about 500MB, my Acrobat Professional takes about 1.6GB.
So your 64GB should be fine I think for your requirements.
October 10, 2011 10:28:15 AM

Good.

As for Windows update, I haven't installed SP1 yet and how much additional space is that? I also tend to not update Windows unless I absolutely need to. i.e., I have an issue that Windows update can fix, or 'don't fix if it ain't broke,' etc.
a b G Storage
October 10, 2011 10:57:18 AM

Well, my windows folder itself is 24GB.....
October 10, 2011 7:21:20 PM

I wouldn't advise not doing updates etc. for your Windows OS.

Many updates are not just security issues; but, performance and driver issues as well. Even if you don't connect this machine to the Internet, there are often updates being developed even on a daily basis that are not only functional improvements; but, even corrections on past "mistakes". Too, newer technology requires new programing that requires windows to keep up with, such as; new SSD developments.

I set my machine to "notify only" on any updates and then I can choose to install or not by reviewing what the updates are, for, and what they do. I prefer this method over having something being downloaded at a time when I don't want it to, and having programs etc. being installed that I don't know about or what they might be doing to my machine. Too, I just like having more control over my computer.

J
October 17, 2011 9:44:31 PM

I just realized that those who are saying they have noticed a vast improvement from HDD to SSDs have machines faster and better than mine to start off with. This leads me to suspect that this is so because you guys have faster CPUs, better video cards and RAM, etc which allow the SSDs to shine whereas my machine which is slow and outdated may not show similar noticeable improvements, if at all.
a b G Storage
October 18, 2011 11:04:32 AM

That is also a valid point, but, we also had system before which may have been worse than yours, and the SSD in them did make a difference.:) 
!