Is this processor 64 bit?

Hi,

I've been trying to find out whether or not to buy Windows 7 32 or 64 bit version. I dont know that much about computers, but I have tried finding information about this. But it has been abit hard. Most "tests" I've used looks at what OS currently is running as. But I want to know if my hardware can support 64 bit as it would allow me to put more ram in the computer and get a better experience.

My processor is called:
Intel® Core™2 Duo CPU E6750 2.66 GHz.

I dont know if you need more info than that. Just ask!
10 answers Last reply
More about processor
  1. it is 64 bit :)
  2. Well if it is, thats just awesome.

    But when I open device manager and look at details for the "two" processors they both say x86 family and something else. And I got the impression after going through all those pages on the web that that was 32bit only. But again, Im far from computer xpert as you well may notice. I just want to buy the correct windows :)
  3. x86 is 32 bit, yes. The Core 2 series supports x86-64 though, which extends the x86 instruction set to 64 bit.
  4. ok, thanks alot for the help then. I will go purchase my windows 7 64 bit :D
  5. All processor since 2004 or less are x86-x64.
  6. saint19 said:
    All processor since 2004 or less are x86-x64.


    A lot of Atoms are 32-bit only.
  7. A lot of the socket 754 Semprons are 32 bit only.
  8. Heh, heh, heh, lets rephrase that for all the nit picky people, any decent half ass processor that people with even a lick of common sense will buy made since 2004 is 64 bit.
  9. jitpublisher said:
    Heh, heh, heh, lets rephrase that for all the nit picky people, any decent half ass processor that people with even a lick of common sense will buy made since 2004 is 64 bit.


    +1, it's only common sense. The Atom is for basic rigs (like the neo from AMD), and the semprons are the celeron of AMD used for basic laptops and desktops.
  10. download the windows 7 compatibility test program from Microsoft. it will tell you if you can run 64 bit or not.
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