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Pc3 10600 vs. pc3 10666 What's the difference

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November 12, 2009 9:00:38 PM

I'm going nuts trying to find the correct answer. Does anybody REALLY know? Thanks!!

More about : pc3 10600 pc3 10666 difference

November 13, 2009 1:59:46 AM

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November 13, 2009 2:03:57 AM

PC3-10600 DDR3

PC3-10600 is one type of DDR3 SDRAM. This memory is also called DDR3-1333. Technical specifications for these RAM chips are below:

Memory clock: 166 MHz

I/O bus clock: 667 MHz

Data transfers per second: 1333 million

Peak transfer rate: 10667 MB/s

Cycle time: 6 ns

CAS Latency / CL (memory timings): 7-7-7 or 8-8-8 or 9-9-9 or 10-10-10

PC3-10600 chip capacity can be either 512MB, 1GB, 2GB, or 4GB. Two chips are frequently combined in order to attain a total such as 2GB or 4GB, increasing the amount of PC3-10600 DDR3 SDRAM. Different sums such as 3GB, 8GB, as well as others, are possible. 2GB is a common standard amount in new personal computers and laptops, although some contain less, and even more may be useful, particularly with multitasking, intensive use, or 3D games.

It should also be noted that 4GB or more of RAM may not be entirely used by 32-bit operating systems, due to inherent limits in the technology. User of computers with 4GB or above may wish to upgrade to a 64-bit operating system, which will allow the full memory to be harnessed.


DDR3 Memory: Technology Explained

These are uncertain financial times we live in today, and the rise and fall of our economy has had direct affect on consumer spending. It has already been one full year now that DDR3 has been patiently waiting for the enthusiast community to give it proper consideration, yet it's success is still undermined by misconceptions and high price. Benchmark Reviews has been testing DDR3 more actively than anyone, which is why over fifteen different kits fill our System Memory section of reviews. Sadly, it might take an article like this to open the eyes of my fellow hardware enthusiast and overclocker, because it seems like DDR3 is the technology nobody wants bad enough to learn about. Pity, because DDR3 is the key to extreme overclocking.

* A-Data PC3-12800 CL7-7-7-20 AD31600X002GU DDR3 1600MHz 1.75-1.85V 2x1GB RAM Kit
* Aeneon PC3-10666 CL8-8-8-15 AXH760UD00-13GA98X DDR3 1333MHz 1.5V 2x1GB RAM Kit
* Aeneon PC3-12800 CL9-9-9-28 AXH860UD20-16H DDR3 1600MHz 1.5V 2x2GB RAM Kit
* Corsair PC3-14400 CL7-7-7-20 TWIN3X2048-1800C7DF G DDR3 1800MHz 2.0V 2x1GB RAM Kit
* Crucial PC3-12800 CL8-8-8-24 BL2KIT12864BA1608 Ballistix DDR3 1600MHz 1.8V 2x1GB RAM Kit
* GeIL PC3-8500 CL6-6-6-15 G31GB1066C6PDCA DDR3 1066MHz 1.5V 2x512MB RAM Kit
* Kingston PC3-13000 CL7-7-7-20 KHX13000D3LLK2/2G DDR3 1625MHz 1.9V 2x1GB RAM Kit
* Mushkin PC3-10666 CL6-7-6-18 HP3-10666 DDR3 1333MHz 1.8V 1GBx2 RAM Kit
* OCZ PC3-12800 CL7-7-7-24 OCZ3P16002GK Platinum Series DDR3 1600MHz 1.9V 2x1GB RAM Kit
* Patriot PC3-15000 CL8-8-8-24 PDC32G1866LLK DDR3 1866MHz 1.9V 2x1GB RAM Kit
* Qimonda PC3-8500 CL7-7-7-20 Aeneon AEH760UD00-10FA98X DDR3 1066MHz 1.5V 2x1GB RAM Kit
* SimpleTech PC3-10600 S1024R5NP2QA DDR3 1333MHz 2x1GB RAM Kit
* Super Talent PC3-14400 CL7-7-7-20 W1800UX2GP DDR3 1800MHz 2.0V 2x1GB RAM Kit
* Winchip PC3-10666 CL8-8-8-15 64A0TRHN8G17E DDR3 1333MHz 1.65V 2x1GB RAM Kit

First and foremost, DDR3 is not just a faster version of DDR2. In fact, the worst piece of misinformation I see spread in enthusiast forums is how DDR3 simply picks up speed where DDR2 left off... which is as accurate as saying an airplane picks up where a kite left off. DDR3 does improve upon the previous generation in certain shared areas, and the refined fabrication process has allowed for a more efficient integrated circuit (IC) module. Although DDR3 doesn't share the same pin connections or key placements, it does still share the DIMM profile and overall appearance. From a technical perspective however, this is where the similarities end.

For over six months now, I have personally devoted a large amount of time towards testing this new system memory standard. Sadly, most of my efforts have gone unappreciated; DDR3 was too far ahead of it's time to be adopted early on. Yet, even though DDR2 has clearly reached its limit, the cost of production combined with a wide-scale recession will further harm acceptance of the new format. But are you really missing anything? I could give you a simple 'yes', but that's what I've already been saying for many months now. Instead, I invite you learn about what you're losing...
Features:

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Now supports a system level flight time compensation
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Mirror-friendly DRAM pin out are now contained on-DIMM
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CAS Write latency are now issued to each speed bin
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Asynchronous reset function is available for the first time in SDRAM
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I/O calibration engine monitors flight time and correction levels
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Automatic data bus line read and write calibration

Improvements:

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Higher bandwidth performance increase, up to 1600 MHz per spec
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DIMM-terminated 'fly-by' command bus
*
Constructed with high-precision load line calibration resistors
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Performance increase at low power input
*
Enhanced low power features conserve energy
*
Improved thermal design now operates DIMM co
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November 13, 2009 2:30:20 AM

That only seems to be half the answer (and tons of irrelevant info to sift through). What are the specs of PC3-10666 that make it different from those of PC3-10600 you posted? Both are listed as DDR3-1333.
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November 20, 2009 7:19:19 PM

I've been an electronic engineer for 45+ years, and a system builder since 1980. After 2 hours of searching the net, I couldn't find the answer to this question, so I thought I would just ask.

Silly me. :pt1cable: 
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Best solution

January 8, 2010 7:04:05 PM

From http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ddr3-1333-speed-lat...

The "official" name for DDR memory is based on its bandwidth rather than clock speed. The easy method to convert data rate to bandwidth is to multiply by eight. Thus, DDR-400 is called PC-3200; DDR2-800 is called PC2-6400 and DDR3-1600 is called PC2-12800.

The math behind this conversion factor is simple: PC memory modules based on SDRAM technology use a 64-bit connection; there are eight bits in a byte and 64 bits equal eight bytes. For example, DDR2-800 transfers 800 megabits per pathway per second; its 64 pathways provide one eight-byte transfer per cycle and 800 times eight is 6400.

The problem comes with "rounding" and was first noticed with DDR-266 (PC-2100). The data rate of 266 MHz is actually 266.6 (continuously repeating decimal) megahertz, so the true transfer rate was 2133 MHz.

Today's DDR3-1333 has a peak bandwidth of 10666 MHz, which can be improperly rounded down and called PC3-10600, rounded up to be called PC3-10700 or stated without rounding as PC3-10666 depending on the manufacturer's desires.

Buyers will find that searching some venders for multiple DDR3-1333 brands will require them to check all three "ratings" to view modules of the same actual speed, but most brands label their DDR3-1333 products as either PC3-10600 or PC3-10666.
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January 14, 2010 11:10:17 PM

masiman said:
From http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ddr3-1333-speed-lat...

The problem comes with "rounding" and was first noticed with DDR-266 (PC-2100). The data rate of 266 MHz is actually 266.6 (continuously repeating decimal) megahertz, so the true transfer rate was 2133 MHz.

Today's DDR3-1333 has a peak bandwidth of 10666 MHz, which can be improperly rounded down and called PC3-10600, rounded up to be called PC3-10700 or stated without rounding as PC3-10666 depending on the manufacturer's desires.

AHA! Somebody who actually knows! :)  I suspected this was true, but am so glad to have it confirmed. :)  :) 

Thank you masiman! :D 
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April 10, 2010 1:00:11 AM

Hey mikrondon! Don't forget to pick a best answer. masiman can earn badges if you select his answer as best.
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April 20, 2010 1:58:16 AM

Best answer selected by mikrodon.
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