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Adjusting rpm on Laing DDC-1t

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April 4, 2012 2:50:22 AM

I have a adapter like the picture below, do you guys think this allows me to get power from PSU and use the motherboard to adjust it speed?

It looks like my fan came with 3pin to 4pin molex adapter that connects Black and red wire from PSU, then there is a yellow wire connected to female plug that connects to motherboard.

The adapter gets yellow wire from motherboard and Red/Black from PSU can this allow me to control the pump from motherboard?

here is the picture of the 4pin to 3pin adapter:
a b K Overclocking
April 5, 2012 5:17:07 AM

no. the mother board uses a h-bridge and transistors to control fan speeds. with the psu providing the power to the fan directly, the mother board may be able to see the fan, but is unable to do anything with it, under these conditions. 1) fist question why use this set kind of set up( don't worry about the fact it won't work) I am trying to ascertain what kind of set up will under the conditions you have.
a b V Motherboard
April 5, 2012 7:34:22 AM

IF you want to control the speed on the pump you will need to buy a proper pump speed controller unit. I know they have them.

My question is why do you need to control the pump speed? I have a Laing DDC-1T, I have it running at full speed, dead silent.
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a b K Overclocking
April 5, 2012 8:01:20 AM

grandpatzer said:
I have a adapter like the picture below, do you guys think this allows me to get power from PSU and use the motherboard to adjust it speed?

It looks like my fan came with 3pin to 4pin molex adapter that connects Black and red wire from PSU, then there is a yellow wire connected to female plug that connects to motherboard.

The adapter gets yellow wire from motherboard and Red/Black from PSU can this allow me to control the pump from motherboard?

here is the picture of the 4pin to 3pin adapter:
]http://www.overclock.net/image/id/2108899/width/300/height/225


hay, now I get it that is why you said "pump" here is a easy project that will allow you to control that pump -real cheep- to 10 dollars max http://www.slotcarillustrated.com/index.php?categoryid=...
this will allow you to control the speed of the pump directly just build it and hook it up the pump is designed for this type of controller VS. a pump with PWM with is pulse width modulation control this type of controller would require a micro controller set up to adjust the pump. or you can just buy one.
a b K Overclocking
April 5, 2012 8:27:09 AM

I get it(light on) you were thanking that you could control your pump the same way that you do the fans connected to your motherboard. wow!!! that sounds like a cool idea. but it won't work, the problem is the current restrictions that come with connecting any fan to the motherboard. this same restriction would still apply to your pump. meaning that even if it did turn on, with I do not thank that it will. it can never get to full speed, no matter what you do. but if you had a pump with the PWM ability, I can show how you can do that. by way of a interface window on the computer screen, you could even have it change speeds based on temps. no hands needed all automatic.
a c 324 K Overclocking
April 5, 2012 3:25:18 PM

I don't really get why there is such a large influx of people wanting to control pump speed or are worried about pumps being noisy. If you seriously want PWM on a pump, just get a MCP35x pump. Otherwise, run your pump at the speed it is meant to run, or in the case of a D5 Vario, set it and forget it. This isn't that big of a deal...these pumps are very, very, VERY quiet. If your pump isn't there is something wrong with your pump or with air in your loop.

a b K Overclocking
April 5, 2012 6:58:22 PM

hay there, I don't know why either. but it's not my job to ask why, I just enjoy the challenge. the question has been presented before you so how would you solve it? to me this is the fun part, whether or not in the end you choose to do it, is entirely based on all the possibilities placed before you. if I asked every person who came to me with a project, why do you wont to do this? I would never build anything . so instead I have learned to jest not ask, and let them make that decision for them self's.
a c 324 K Overclocking
April 5, 2012 7:18:00 PM

My intention is to address two different concerns-

Those who have never watercooled and are thinking up things to try doing before they actually try watercooling

-or-

Those who might be considering controlling pump speed due to noise, when it very likely is something other than actual pump rpm such as air, cavitation or pump damage.
a b K Overclocking
April 5, 2012 7:31:57 PM

well that is solid thanking and the concern for others is truly inspiring. don't you ever get those who jest wont to do it because they can, and maybe wont to learn something new in the process or am I jest way out of line here.
a c 324 K Overclocking
April 5, 2012 8:21:07 PM

I'm trying to provide enough information to those who don't know what they are doing to realize that they might permanently damage their pump and/or other hardware in the process of 'I wanted to do this because I wanted to be able to play with something'.

There is really no benefit to constantly change your pump speed up and down if you are not using a PWM enabled pump to begin with. I know there are some debates to what I am saying, but I have counter-debates for each as well.
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