Whats the difference between these two SSd's?

http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/481324/OCZ-Technology-Vertex-3-VTX3-25SAT3/


http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/481243/OCZ-Technology-Vertex-3-VTX3MI-25SAT3/


They look the same, but one cost about 50 more. let me know thanks!! Also are these good drives?> i have some office depot credit this is why i ask.
9 answers Last reply
More about whats difference
  1. The first one which is less expensive is the OCZ Vertex 3.

    The second one which is more expensive is the OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS.

    The Max IOPS is a Vertex 3 that has been modified to increase IOPS. Typical users will not notice any difference.

    IOPS is an analytical measurement on the business enterprise side of the market that helps determine server requirements when mutiple desktops are connected to the server. It was never meant to be used in the consumer market. Consider it another marketing ploy aimed at unsuspecting consumers.
  2. why go for a ssd? They have a write limit on them and after the limit is reached the drive fails.

    What do you prefer? A fast and short hdd life

    Or

    A slower drive but a longer life?
  3. night_wolf said:
    why go for a ssd? They have a write limit on them and after the limit is reached the drive fails.

    What do you prefer? A fast and short hdd life

    Or

    A slower drive but a longer life?


    U don't have one, do u?

    97% users will not see the end of life of the their SSD. It will most likely die due to something else, like an electric issue. Same apply to the HDD.
  4. night_wolf said:
    why go for a ssd? They have a write limit on them and after the limit is reached the drive fails.

    What do you prefer? A fast and short hdd life

    Or

    A slower drive but a longer life?



    The prudent user with data to protect should replace ANY storage device after 3 years max. However, during those 3 years the SSD is faster, more rugged, cheaper to run and less likely to fail owing to the absense of moving parts. To me, it's an insurance policy.
  5. nikorr said:
    U don't have one, do u?

    97% users will not see the end of life of the their SSD. It will most likely die due to something else, like an electric issue. Same apply to the HDD.


    nikorr is 100% correct.

    And if by the remote chance that you exhaust all of your write cycles the drive becomes "read only"; so you can still recover your data.
  6. night_wolf - You are partially correct. SSD's do have a write limit. When the first consumer oriented ssd's were introduced in 2007 it was a legitimate concern. A lot has changed since then. With modern ssd's write limits are no longer a concern.
  7. Yea write limits now are huge you would have to write the entire drive every day for 5 years to hit the limit.
  8. true i understand what you all say, and yes it will take allot of time to reach the limit but for me that is a problem, I wouldn't use (personally) a ssd drive just yet unless in the future when the old spin drives die out and its all ssd and the next best thing and i don't have a choice.

    One of these days the ssds will be allot cheaper and bigger without the write limit. then the main servers in major corporations will start to use them,

    Just cant wait for that day!!
  9. Night_wolf - I think you have things a little mixed up.

    Solid state drives were first used by major corporations long before consumer ssd's were made available. Unfortunately they are very expensive. The top two ssd manufacturers are Fusio-io and STEC. The two companies focus almost exclusively on business enterprise. They don't bother with the consumer market. The introduction of SATA based ssd's by other smaller manufactueres was a cost cutting measure to make ssd's more affordable for consumers.
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