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1366 northbridge running hot.

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May 22, 2010 9:22:43 AM

Hello, I have a i7 930 1366 system and my chipset is running very warm, I idle around 57 and at load it gets up to 65, when overclocked I have seen it get up to 70C so I just leave it at stock settings, I have a megahalems cpu cooler , I just switch to this from a corsair h50 and the temps went down a couple Cº, anyway my motherboard is a Gigabyte GA-x58A-UD3R. I was wondering if there is anything in this bios that I can change or decrease some type of voltage to help decrease the temps. I have very good cooling in my case, it doesnt make a difference if the window is open or closed. Also if worst case I have to buy an aftermarket chipset cooler for this motherboard what would you recommend I get? what kind? here is a picture of my motherboard:

http://i.neoseeker.com/p/Hardware/Motherboards/Socket_1...

Anywho I really want to fix this so I can have a mild overclock without degrading the life of the motherboard or even cpu. Temps for the cpu are fine, will go into that later.

Thanks
a b V Motherboard
May 22, 2010 9:40:28 AM

The X58 chipset does run hot, in my BIOS it says it is reaching 72°C. The only way is to either buy a better northbridge cooler which is kinda hard unless you plan to watercool, or add another fan.
January 14, 2011 10:05:36 PM

i have the same problem (yes i know this is a old thread) i have the lower end mobo of yours and im getting up to 78c under prime95 but nothing has gone wrong yet im scared because my last mobo asrock extreme caught on fire near the north bridge if you have found a solution please share
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January 15, 2011 1:41:31 AM

bobthecatkiller said:
i have the same problem (yes i know this is a old thread) i have the lower end mobo of yours and im getting up to 78c under prime95 but nothing has gone wrong yet im scared because my last mobo asrock extreme caught on fire near the north bridge if you have found a solution please share



If your motherboard allows modifications ( mounting holes), you can change the heat sink with a better&bigger one, eventually with an active cooler. By better, I understand the alloy from which is made of, the thickness of the bottom (kinda thick is good, but very thick is bad), and the height of the elements. Be careful, as some products have the heat sink glued, and it's very hard to get it off. Keep one eye on the board... the other on the hands :) ... as you can hurt yourself in the process. If the heat sink is glued, I suggest that you use slow rotation moves of it, instead of just pulling off ( you don't want to see the chipset in your hands, I am sure of that). Another thing, and you should pay attention here, is the thermal grease. It's very important that you use an uniform layer on the surface of the chipset, so the cooler get his job done. You can find that in a electronics parts shop, or in a computer shop, or... online.
Question. Do you use the power supply from the computer where that asrock motherboard burned? If you do, I think it's better to check it. Visual, and with some voltage device.
If you are new in this, it's better to look for a IT service center.
Good luck:) 
January 15, 2011 2:47:18 AM

the blacksmith said:
If your motherboard allows modifications ( mounting holes), you can change the heat sink with a better&bigger one, eventually with an active cooler. By better, I understand the alloy from which is made of, the thickness of the bottom (kinda thick is good, but very thick is bad), and the height of the elements. Be careful, as some products have the heat sink glued, and it's very hard to get it off. Keep one eye on the board... the other on the hands :) ... as you can hurt yourself in the process. If the heat sink is glued, I suggest that you use slow rotation moves of it, instead of just pulling off ( you don't want to see the chipset in your hands, I am sure of that). Another thing, and you should pay attention here, is the thermal grease. It's very important that you use an uniform layer on the surface of the chipset, so the cooler get his job done. You can find that in a electronics parts shop, or in a computer shop, or... online.
Question. Do you use the power supply from the computer where that asrock motherboard burned? If you do, I think it's better to check it. Visual, and with some voltage device.
If you are new in this, it's better to look for a IT service center.
Good luck:) 



something had to of malfunctioned in the asrock mobo thats why it caught on fire maybe from me dragging it to a lan party lol the psu is totally fine corsair 850w tested after searching online i found a ton and i mean a ton of articles about how hot there north bridges are on gigabyte boards im not to worried about it but i would like to push 4ghz again so i bought a 40mm fan to mount near it im not new at this stuff been building for 4 yrs now and nothing has gone wrong except the asrock mobo which was probably my fault because i think the north bridge heat sink came lose while being transported to the lan party but then again i would think at a certain temp. the computer would shut it self down...

just got done playing some ROH lol i know old game but still a classic north bridge temps seemed to stay around the mid 50s usually at high 70s i added a fan to the 800d case in the cd drive bays its cooling it really well and is quite at that... still gonna add the 40mm fan since i already bought it lol
January 15, 2011 8:41:16 AM

bobthecatkiller said:
something had to of malfunctioned in the asrock mobo thats why it caught on fire maybe from me dragging it to a lan party lol the psu is totally fine corsair 850w tested after searching online i found a ton and i mean a ton of articles about how hot there north bridges are on gigabyte boards im not to worried about it but i would like to push 4ghz again so i bought a 40mm fan to mount near it im not new at this stuff been building for 4 yrs now and nothing has gone wrong except the asrock mobo which was probably my fault because i think the north bridge heat sink came lose while being transported to the lan party but then again i would think at a certain temp. the computer would shut it self down...

just got done playing some ROH lol i know old game but still a classic north bridge temps seemed to stay around the mid 50s usually at high 70s i added a fan to the 800d case in the cd drive bays its cooling it really well and is quite at that... still gonna add the 40mm fan since i already bought it lol



Glad to hear that you have some experience with that :) 
There is no cooling like the direct cooling :) . Yes, the 40 mm fan is needed. A strong, fast one. However, you will need to check it from time to time, as high temp can damage the cooler, which can become a barrier in ... cooling :) 
January 21, 2011 11:46:55 PM

I was running way hot temps, that was right when I got the motherboard, I lowered the voltages on the mobo, got a antec spot fan and put it next to the very edge of my video card, right where the hard drives have their sata cable inputs. I have it blowing on the northbridge, I am overclocked to 4ghz right now and my northbridge idle right now is 43, When I overclock my 5830 to 950/1300 and am running burn in tests or crysis with everything max, video card usually gets to 68-72Cº and northbridge to 53-54 no higher. So try lowering voltages.
January 22, 2011 5:06:02 PM

vexun11 said:
I was running way hot temps, that was right when I got the motherboard, I lowered the voltages on the mobo, got a antec spot fan and put it next to the very edge of my video card, right where the hard drives have their sata cable inputs. I have it blowing on the northbridge, I am overclocked to 4ghz right now and my northbridge idle right now is 43, When I overclock my 5830 to 950/1300 and am running burn in tests or crysis with everything max, video card usually gets to 68-72Cº and northbridge to 53-54 no higher. So try lowering voltages.


did you lower cpu voltages or what? what mobo voltages did you lower? with the 40mm fan on mine (hooked by zip ties) i get a max of 52c but it looks dumb i kind of want to rma this board and get something besides gigabyte as much as i love this board
January 22, 2011 7:01:22 PM

If you havent changed your voltages and are running default voltages, you should be able to overclock to 4ghz with those set voltages, does that give you an idea of how high gigabyte sets them by default? Try just changing the vcore from 1.25 which is default to like 1.2 then 1.15 then 1.1 until your system wont boot.

Also my motherboard used to make a high pitch sound, I thought the board was defective so I ended up changing the voltage from auto @ 1.25 and lowered it and the high pitch sound went away.

Yea I had a small fan zip tied to the nb heatsink, it looked horrible and it made only 2Cº difference in temps after I lowered voltages.
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