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Keeping my SSD in top shape

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October 14, 2011 1:45:36 AM

I've read through a few of the recommended articles, but most of them seem to refer to earlier SSDs. I purchased the Patriot Pyro and am waiting for it to come in. What exactly do I need to do to make sure it is set-up to last as long as possible without losing speed? I know I need to turn off defrag. I also need to enable TRIM (though I'm not sure how). I'm only installing apps and games on it, but other data (like my iTunes music library) will be on another drive that my iTunes can access. The rest I'm not sure about. I heard something about keeping temp files on another drive instead of the SSD? And keeping documents on another drive as well in case you need to make edits, since SSDs have issues with overwriting old data.

Clearly, I'm a little confused about SSDs in general. Any tips to get me going?

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a c 170 G Storage
October 14, 2011 2:27:06 AM

1) Just install the SSD, put what you want on it, and enjoy it. Forget the micromanagement stuff.

2) Longevity is not an issue. The normal desktop user can pound away on it for 10 years before it starts to run out of write capability. It will be long obsolete before then.
Actually, the more you use it the better. You bought it to speed up I/O, so the more you use it, the more value you are getting out of it. Keep your temp files, and page files on it where they can be accessed faster.

3) True, defrag is not necessary, but windows will detect that it is a ssd by the fast response times, and turn off defrag anyway.

4) To get trim, you set the sata mode as AHCI(not ide) in the bios. It is possible to specify raid, which is a superset of ahci, but the SSD can not be part of the raid array.
If the OS is already installed with IDE, and you change to ahci, you will not boot because windows does not have the ahci drivers. It is possible to change it with registry hacks, but I really think I would clean install the os on the SSD, where you would get the most benefit from it.

5) Protect your files with EXTERNAL backup regardless. A SSD is as reliable as conventional hard drives, so don't change your protection procedures.
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October 14, 2011 2:46:23 AM

Thanks for the reply! So when I first put it together, I should first set the SSD to AHCI in the bios, then install windows? That should take care of the TRIM issue, right?

I have an external that I keep all my data backed up to. I was just thinking of keeping my iTunes library on my HDD because it is quite large and I don't want to eat up all the space on the SSD. I want to save that for games. I'll ignore the Temp files and all that stuff, too. If I install a few games, then uninstall them to make room for new games, I won't run into issues of the SSD slowing down, will I? Because the game installs are fairly large, and I'm worried about faster write speed loss because of that.
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a c 170 G Storage
October 14, 2011 2:52:21 AM

Sovelin said:
Thanks for the reply! So when I first put it together, I should first set the SSD to AHCI in the bios, then install windows? That should take care of the TRIM issue, right?

I have an external that I keep all my data backed up to. I was just thinking of keeping my iTunes library on my HDD because it is quite large and I don't want to eat up all the space on the SSD. I want to save that for games. I'll ignore the Temp files and all that stuff, too. If I install a few games, then uninstall them to make room for new games, I won't run into issues of the SSD slowing down, will I? Because the game installs are fairly large, and I'm worried about faster write speed loss because of that.


Exactly. Set the sata mode to ahci, then windows 7 will install the proper drivers which will also enable trim.
That's all. Done.

Put your large files like videos or itunes on the hard drive.

Install a couple of your current games on the SSD.
If you start running out of space, leave the games installed on the SSD, but make room by moving the game's data files to the hard drive.
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October 14, 2011 3:20:35 AM

Best answer selected by sovelin.
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October 14, 2011 3:21:41 AM

geofelt said:

Install a couple of your current games on the SSD.
If you start running out of space, leave the games installed on the SSD, but make room by moving the game's data files to the hard drive.


What do you mean by move the data files? Like, move the game data from Steams App folder to the hard drive? Would the game still be able to find the file?
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a c 170 G Storage
October 15, 2011 1:31:53 AM

Sovelin said:
What do you mean by move the data files? Like, move the game data from Steams App folder to the hard drive? Would the game still be able to find the file?


I have not done that, but It should work.

You can always move them back to the original place if you want to play that game without rinstalling.

But... test it out to be certain.
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October 15, 2011 6:55:28 AM

That sounds pretty good. I'll definitely try it. But doesn't that have the same issue of uninstalling it (takes up ton of space on SSD originally, moving it to the HDD lets the OS think it is off the SSD, but the SSD still has that space occupied)?
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a c 170 G Storage
October 15, 2011 5:22:18 PM

Sovelin said:
That sounds pretty good. I'll definitely try it. But doesn't that have the same issue of uninstalling it (takes up ton of space on SSD originally, moving it to the HDD lets the OS think it is off the SSD, but the SSD still has that space occupied)?


The SSD acts just like a sata drive.
When you move data from it, the space is available for something else.
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