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32/64 bit CPU & Mobo

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February 1, 2010 5:55:57 PM

Hi,

I am building a cheap computer and have a work related limitation of needing to run Vista/32 to use our VPN. But I'd like to build something with a path to future upgradability - so first, If I got a 64 cpu - could I just use the Vista32 because it would be backward compatible? Is this as efficient as just using a 32cpu? And if not, can I get a mobo that I can start with a 32cpu and later upgrade to 64cpu? Or do they have different pins/physical issues?

Thanks, Jeff

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a b à CPUs
February 1, 2010 5:59:23 PM

All current CPUs from Intel and AMD (with the exception of certain Intel Atoms) are 64 bit. They will run both 32 and 64 bit operating systems perfectly.
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February 1, 2010 6:18:26 PM

Hey thanks, so when my company tells me I can't use the Vista/64 or Windows7(64) - I can still use the newer cpu's with Vista/32 and the VPN won't know the difference, right?

Hey, love the rocket photo, is that yours?
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February 1, 2010 6:45:18 PM

cjl said:
All current CPUs from Intel and AMD (with the exception of certain Intel Atoms) are 64 bit. They will run both 32 and 64 bit operating systems perfectly.


Hey thanks, so when my company tells me I can't use the Vista/64 or Windows7(64) - I can still use the newer cpu's with Vista/32 and the VPN won't know the difference, right?

Hey, love the rocket photo, is that yours?
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a b à CPUs
February 1, 2010 6:47:42 PM

I believe the hardware should be invisible to the VPN with the exception of the network adaptor.
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a b à CPUs
February 1, 2010 6:52:59 PM

Kimokana said:
Hey thanks, so when my company tells me I can't use the Vista/64 or Windows7(64) - I can still use the newer cpu's with Vista/32 and the VPN won't know the difference, right?

Hey, love the rocket photo, is that yours?

Exactly. The newer CPUs will behave exactly like older CPUs when paired with a 32 bit OS (aside from the obvious fact that the newer CPUs will be quite a bit faster than the older ones).

Oh, and the rocket is mine, yes. I didn't take the photo, but I built and flew the rocket. That photo is from a launch in October 2007.
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February 1, 2010 7:29:08 PM

Cool, thanks guys, that means I can get a good newer CPU and not be held back by my companies slowness to move forward.

Hey cjl - is that the same kind of estes rocket engines I used to use when I was younger? Or is there something bigger and better these days? I always loved rocketry. How tall is that rocket? Thanks for the help.
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a b à CPUs
February 1, 2010 7:54:51 PM

It's a bit bigger than Estes.

That rocket is 6 feet 6 inches tall, 6 inches in diameter, and weighs between 30 and 35 pounds loaded. The motors in that picture were Aerotech K700s (as you can see, it uses 2 at a time), each of which has roughly 130 times the power of an Estes D motor. In that flight, it achieved just under a mile in altitude.
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a b à CPUs
February 1, 2010 8:00:59 PM

Here's a bigger image of the liftoff on that flight:

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a b à CPUs
February 1, 2010 8:11:41 PM

cool pic!
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February 1, 2010 8:21:54 PM

OK, wow, that is awesome. Now I'm in trouble, I didn't even know these bigger systems existed, so now I'm going to go find out all about it and end up getting roped into a whole new hobby!

Do you have to be licensed or anything, are there airspace limitations?

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a b à CPUs
February 1, 2010 8:48:58 PM

You do need certification for motors larger than G, and for rockets over 3.3 pounds, you need an FAA waiver. Usually, clubs handle that portion of it though, so you can just show up at a club launch and they have taken care of all of the FAA issues and such.

As for the certification, it's fairly easy to get, at least for the lower levels. If you're interested, I would say try going to a couple of local launches (see if you can find a local club), and ask around.
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