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Cpu vs motherboard vs memory speed

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February 2, 2010 1:38:13 AM

I went to the Intel site and see a memory spec for core i7-900 seires cpus supporting a memory type of ddr3 800/1066. However the motherboard for those cpu, the DX58SO, specs DDR3 up to 1600mhz.

Is there an answer to this apparent conflict in the specs for the cpus and the associated motherboard?



February 2, 2010 2:12:32 AM

rcgldr said:
I went to the Intel site and see a memory spec for core i7-900 seires cpus supporting a memory type of ddr3 800/1066. However the motherboard for those cpu, the DX58SO, specs DDR3 up to 1600mhz.

Is there an answer to this apparent conflict in the specs for the cpus and the associated motherboard?


It just means that the motherboard can support ddr3 memory modules up to 1600 mhz. Most 1366 motherboards support those speeds.

Just remember that the i7 9xx series changes your memory frequency to 1066 at stock.
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February 2, 2010 7:10:17 AM

quattro04 said:
Just remember that the i7 9xx series changes your memory frequency to 1066 at stock.
So what is the point of stating the motherboard supports up to 1600mhz memory if the CPU limits this to 1066 (overclocking)? The memory specs for standard and extreme 9xx series are the same, where does the faster "quick path interconnect" (QPI) bandwidth come into play?


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February 2, 2010 8:14:56 AM

So if i buy a 1600MHz RAM and don't overclock the PC, that means the RAM's are pretty much useless, is it?
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February 2, 2010 10:47:49 AM

that sums it up nicely - but yeas thats correct.

buying fatser rated RAM for X58 chipsets / i7 9** CPU's is not really worth the extra cost unless you plan to overclock your CPU or RAM.
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February 2, 2010 10:54:57 AM

^^Wow! That's pretty sad for people who don't know how to overclock! And doesn't overclocking nullify the warranty?
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February 2, 2010 11:10:53 AM

hell_storm2004 said:
And doesn't overclocking nullify the warranty?

Then don't volunteer the information during any RMA process. :whistle: 
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February 3, 2010 2:16:53 AM

^^But I heard that the manufacturers can find out if the CPU, RAM or GPU has been overclocked? Is it true?
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February 3, 2010 2:58:00 AM

hell_storm2004 said:
^^But I heard that the manufacturers can find out if the CPU, RAM or GPU has been overclocked? Is it true?

Unless they have you under surveillance they can only assume you have been OC'ing.
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February 3, 2010 2:59:13 AM

Ok! Thanks for the info.
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February 3, 2010 3:19:06 AM

Ignoring the overclocking issues, then it seems what I'm looking for is a low latency timing while running at 1066mhz. One of the "value ram" memory components from Kingston is speced to run at 7-7-7-?? at 1066mhz at 1.5volts. The 4th paramter isn't specified. The 1333mhz hyper x memory is tested at 7-7-7-20 at 1333mhz at 1.65 volts, but will report 9-9-9-?? for 1.5 v.

Assuming I'm not overclocking the cpu, then it's stuck at 1066mhz, and the memory isn't going to be any faster unles it can run with a lower latency rate, like 6-6-6-??, but this isn't covered in any of Kingston datasheets for their memories.
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