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Stair stepped sine waves books

Last response: in Systems
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November 20, 2009 5:11:15 PM

what books are available out there for building a stair stepped sine wave
December 2, 2009 2:19:12 PM

What do you mean by "building" a stair stepped sine wave?
Do you mean you want to create a power supply that will show you a stair stepped sine wave on an oscilloscope?
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December 14, 2009 1:33:21 PM

yes. i want to build a circuit that will show a stair stepped sine wave on an oscilloscope
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December 14, 2009 1:34:16 PM

and i want to find a book(s) showing me how to build one
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December 14, 2009 8:00:39 PM

That has to do with computer engineering and electrical, not computer hardware or software. My knowledge is still limited in that area and I don't know of any books. You might be able to find something online or perhaps find something in electrical or computer engineering college textbooks.

I don't know what the difference between a stair stepping sine wave and any other sine wave is but a sine wave would mean the power source would be AC instead of DC. If you know what you mean mean by "stair stepping" and explain, I'd be willing to try to help more.

For what purpose do you need this?
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December 14, 2009 8:25:51 PM

I think he wants a square wave. Perhaps for PWM purposes?

The easiest way to do it is with a function generator, but they can get rather expensive. I'm sure there's a way to do it with analog circuitry, but it's too difficult for me to figure out.
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December 23, 2009 11:04:25 PM

i didnt think finding a book would be so difficult. or an answer. someone with an electrical background would be good
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December 24, 2009 3:30:17 AM

dblaine333 said:
i didnt think finding a book would be so difficult. or an answer. someone with an electrical background would be good

Sigh. This is because us (myself included) with electrical backgrounds are confused by exactly what you want and what you intend to use it for. Although my knowledge is still limited, I have never heard of a "stair stepping sine wave".

Right now what I am picturing is you wanting to build a circuit for whatever reason that produces a sine wave. Therefore what you need for your power source is an alternating current as opposed to direct current. So build a circuit and connect it to an AC source. You could get yourself a step down transformer and plug it into the wall to use as a source. Then when you put in your oscilloscope, it will produce a sine wave. Without knowing what you need it for though it is really hard to advise. As for your book, any electricity related textbook would explain AC and circuits to you. And like I say, the internet has a lot.
Exactly how much do you know about electricity, circuits etc?
And again, for what application do you need this? This might help us understand what you mean by stair stepping sine wave?
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December 24, 2009 3:33:38 AM

I agree with enzo - I've no idea what you mean by "stair stepping sine wave".
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January 1, 2010 12:46:36 PM

the sine wave looks like a staircase on an oscilloscope. the individual wave forms can be a square wave or even a round wave, but they are stacked and get increasingly higher just like a staircase. if i could draw it out and email or fax it to someone you would know exactly what i am talking about.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 1, 2010 1:59:48 PM

Amazon.com is your friend. I went to Amazon and searched on <staircase wave circuit>. Random selection among the hits that allow preview yielded, first try, The Encyclopedia of Electronic Circuits Volume 6 ( can't get italics for some reason). A peek at the index shows numerous pages on your waveform, though you don't say whether you want RF, AF, microwave, what.
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January 1, 2010 6:10:39 PM

dblaine333 said:
the sine wave looks like a staircase on an oscilloscope. the individual wave forms can be a square wave or even a round wave, but they are stacked and get increasingly higher just like a staircase. if i could draw it out and email or fax it to someone you would know exactly what i am talking about.

So it would be kinda like a combination between a sine wave and a square wave?
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January 1, 2010 6:34:16 PM

enzo matrix said:
So it would be kinda like a combination between a sine wave and a square wave?


I guess. Like if you viewed the wave for all of time, the stairs would be very small and the wave would simply appear as a sine wave - but as you start lowering the interval of time in which you view the wave, you start to see that the wave is made of square steps, instead of being smooth and differentiable.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 1, 2010 6:35:54 PM


I believe he is trying to create a circuit to make the red stepped square wave in that image, you will have to use a function generator, and the price of the parts necessary to do this will likely be about as much as buying a cheap function generator that can do it for you.

If you wanted to do it you could use a few PWMs, some of them wired to a negative input, im not sure where you would get the PWMs or go about programming their controller, havent needed to do so. What are you trying to use this for as a stepped square wave isnt commonly used.
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January 1, 2010 9:34:35 PM

MCS-51 based (8-bit Micro-controller) MCU's can do that for you. Its built in to the chip (PWM and DAC & ADC). You just need to program it. MCS51 is Intel based MCU architecture.

Below is Microchip webpage for its own version of 8 bit and 16 bit MCU

http://www.microchip.com/

You need C or C++ to program this chips. Another option is Assembly code base programming.

The output of these MCUs to generate sine wave are of weak drive(low current). You need to design an Amplifier to drive the Amplitude to your target levels and Current driver to meet your power demands.

Good Luck
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January 9, 2010 2:20:59 PM

it does not look like the picture by hunter315. it is a stairs that goes up(lets say 4-5 steps) then immediately drops to zero stays flat for a time period then produces the stairs again then drops to zero and repeats the cycle.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 9, 2010 3:33:01 PM

oh well that isnt a sine wave in the vaguest sense, im not even sure what i would call a signal with that pattern, it definitely isnt a wave. You may be able to do it with PWMs but it wont be as well documented as making a stepped sine wave so you will need to be a bit more creative.
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