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Phenom II 965 125W better then the upcoming Phenom II 975 ?

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February 3, 2010 1:55:09 PM

Well im still learning about the overclocking & CPU's and blah blah so im not as knowledgable as you guys but I was just thinking ... If the phenom II 965 125W version that was released a few months ago can EASILY be oc'ed on stock voltage to 3.6Ghz, wouldn't that make it a better buy then the 975 ? Because wouldn't the 965 still be at 125W since its still on its stock voltage ? If you get a 975 however you'll have higher wattage (140W) and voltage and you possibly won't be able to overclock as high, So the 965 will be at 3.6GHz with 125W and the 975 140W at 3.6GHz, wouldn't you get a better overclock and more room to overclock with the 965 ? .... lol I know I might be completely wrong but w.e lol.
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a b K Overclocking
February 3, 2010 2:48:48 PM

You theory is correct in the effects of wattage on temps.

I would recommend going with the II X4 955, which can match the II X4 965 in overclocking for less money at 3.6GHz. Either of the three will hit 3.6GHz but the improvements of the newer chips will be when you try to achieve 4.0Ghz and higher.
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a b K Overclocking
February 3, 2010 8:20:01 PM

Power consumption increases with increase to clock speed even while maintaining the same voltage, it's just a much smaller increase than when you increase voltage.

The 955 is the same as the 965, they both easily overclock to 3.6, usually without voltage increase. They also both hit a wall around 4.0Ghz when overclocking, as the 975 is expected to as well since it'll be the same core, making it the same chip.
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February 3, 2010 8:30:34 PM

The 125W value is only true at stock settings. When you overclock and increase the voltage accordingly, you will increase its TDP.

The 975 has a higher TDP due to a higher base clock. However, I suspect it can probably reach a higher overclock than the 965 and with less voltage as well.

So for example (exaggerated numbers), if you OC a 965 to 3.6GHz, it'll be 160W, vs a 3.6GHz 975 with 150W and less voltage.
February 4, 2010 3:03:40 AM

Ok thanks for the help guys, and just 1 more question, Since the 955 and 965 are basically the same chips im sure the 975 will be the same also since its AM3, do you think it will hit a wall at around 3.8GHz or even 4.0GHz GHz like the 965 and 955 ? Because both 955 and 965 usually dont go past 3.8 stable, I know we can't know for sure until its released but I know lots of you guys have alot of experience with AMD I don't = /. well thanks again !
a b K Overclocking
February 4, 2010 9:45:48 AM

The 955 chips do have a bit of trouble past 3.8, but the C3 965 chips (125W versions) can make it past 4.0 without even touching the 1.5V mark that most 955 chips have to go past to reach 4.0 speeds.
February 7, 2010 12:04:43 AM

Hi guys. Another though comes to me reading your posts. This seems to me to be too simple though about. The thermal design power (TDP) represents the maximum amount of thermal power loss the component could resist off and that is required to be dissipated from it.
The real thermal power caused by the actual usage within its limited working condition could/ should not be higher than the fixed TDP (i.e 95 / 125 / 140 W) otherwise the component would be thermally destroyed inside by overheating the die. Chip development that means optimization of structure and distribution of thermal hot spots on the die allows higher frequencies and/ or lower voltage (Vcc) mostly within the same TDP class. The Chip type given maximal TDP will not be exceeded at normal stock setting working conditions reached only if all parameters are driven against their factory limits. But it is also right that increasing voltage increases accruing thermal leakage power as 1-to-1 factor directly meanwhile increasing frequencies influences the thermal dissipation loss only with a factor far below 1 because of the indirect mathematical relation between changing frequency and resulting intensity of a switched current.
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a b K Overclocking
February 7, 2010 12:17:34 AM

Bluescreendeath said:
The 125W value is only true at stock settings. When you overclock and increase the voltage accordingly, you will increase its TDP.

The 975 has a higher TDP due to a higher base clock. However, I suspect it can probably reach a higher overclock than the 965 and with less voltage as well.

So for example (exaggerated numbers), if you OC a 965 to 3.6GHz, it'll be 160W, vs a 3.6GHz 975 with 150W and less voltage.

This is all correct, and the way I understand it.
pjc said:
Hi guys. Another though comes to me reading your posts. This seems to me to be too simple though about. The thermal design power (TDP) represents the maximum amount of thermal power loss the component could resist off and that is required to be dissipated from it.
The real thermal power caused by the actual usage within its limited working condition could/ should not be higher than the fixed TDP (i.e 95 / 125 / 140 W) otherwise the component would be thermally destroyed inside by overheating the die. Chip development that means optimization of structure and distribution of thermal hot spots on the die allows higher frequencies and/ or lower voltage (Vcc) mostly within the same TDP class. The Chip type given maximal TDP will not be exceeded at normal stock setting working conditions reached only if all parameters are driven against their factory limits. But it is also right that increasing voltage increases accruing thermal leakage power as 1-to-1 factor directly meanwhile increasing frequencies influences the thermal dissipation loss only with a factor far below 1 because of the indirect mathematical relation between changing frequency and resulting intensity of a switched current.

I don't understand what your saying. Are you asking a question or trying to explain the tdp of the current amd cpu's ie the c2 and the new c3 steppings. Because I think your overthinking things.

February 7, 2010 12:34:19 AM

any one have the benchmark???
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February 7, 2010 12:44:46 AM

samuraiChamp said:
any one have the benchmark???


I don not think there is a "benchmark" yet for this chip. All you need to do is look for a benchmark with 965/955 running at 3.6ghz though.
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