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Profiles

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September 8, 2004 10:39:12 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

I'd like to create a profile "template" more or less for a group of users
I'll be adding. I'd also like it to be a roaming profile so that they have
the same settings, favorites, etc. whereever they logon.

I've never really used by Windows 2000 server for anything other than
webhosting and e-mail, so I'm not sure how to do this.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

More about : profiles

Anonymous
September 8, 2004 10:51:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

Glenn wrote:
> I'd like to create a profile "template" more or less for a group of
> users I'll be adding. I'd also like it to be a roaming profile so
> that they have the same settings, favorites, etc. whereever they
> logon.
>
> I've never really used by Windows 2000 server for anything other than
> webhosting and e-mail, so I'm not sure how to do this.
>
> Any help would be appreciated.

Some stuff you should know when managing a multi-user environment:

How To Create a Custom Default User Profile
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=319974

HOW TO: Create and Configure User Accounts in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=279783

HOW TO: Set, View, Change, or Remove Special Permissions for Files and
Folders in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=308419

Doug's Windows XP Security Console
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm

Windows XP is a multi-user OS, even when used by one person only, the
fundamentals don't change.

Documents and Settings is the directory that contains your user
information/documents/etc. It also contains a few extra directories used by
Windows.

One is "Default User" - This is used whenever a new account is created. It
bases the initial setup of that account off this directory.

Another is "All Users" - This is used by.. all users. If you want something
to appear on the desktop of every user of the machine, you put it on this
users desktop (in the desktop folder.) Etc.

You may also see "Administrator" - depending on your setup, this is the
original administrator user and if you know that account's password, you
should leave him alone and use him only in an emergency.

You could also (if you have it where you can see ALL files) see
"LocalService" and "NetworkService" folders. These are service accounts,
normally unused by the standard user.

Roaming would imply you have someway of creating the roaming profiles?

--
<- Shenan ->
--
The information is provided "as is", it is suggested you research for
yourself before you take any advice - you are the one ultimately
responsible for your actions/problems/solutions. Know what you are
getting into before you jump in with both feet.
September 8, 2004 11:55:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

I thought that a "Roaming Profile" meant that a user could go from machine
to machine and still have the same settings.

Do I need something special to do that? Or, do I have the wrong definition
of a Roaming Profile?
"Shenan Stanley" <news_helper@hushmail.com> wrote in message
news:erd2F7flEHA.3428@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Glenn wrote:
> > I'd like to create a profile "template" more or less for a group of
> > users I'll be adding. I'd also like it to be a roaming profile so
> > that they have the same settings, favorites, etc. whereever they
> > logon.
> >
> > I've never really used by Windows 2000 server for anything other than
> > webhosting and e-mail, so I'm not sure how to do this.
> >
> > Any help would be appreciated.
>
> Some stuff you should know when managing a multi-user environment:
>
> How To Create a Custom Default User Profile
> http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=319974
>
> HOW TO: Create and Configure User Accounts in Windows XP
> http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=279783
>
> HOW TO: Set, View, Change, or Remove Special Permissions for Files and
> Folders in Windows XP
> http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=308419
>
> Doug's Windows XP Security Console
> http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
>
> Windows XP is a multi-user OS, even when used by one person only, the
> fundamentals don't change.
>
> Documents and Settings is the directory that contains your user
> information/documents/etc. It also contains a few extra directories used
by
> Windows.
>
> One is "Default User" - This is used whenever a new account is created.
It
> bases the initial setup of that account off this directory.
>
> Another is "All Users" - This is used by.. all users. If you want
something
> to appear on the desktop of every user of the machine, you put it on this
> users desktop (in the desktop folder.) Etc.
>
> You may also see "Administrator" - depending on your setup, this is the
> original administrator user and if you know that account's password, you
> should leave him alone and use him only in an emergency.
>
> You could also (if you have it where you can see ALL files) see
> "LocalService" and "NetworkService" folders. These are service accounts,
> normally unused by the standard user.
>
> Roaming would imply you have someway of creating the roaming profiles?
>
> --
> <- Shenan ->
> --
> The information is provided "as is", it is suggested you research for
> yourself before you take any advice - you are the one ultimately
> responsible for your actions/problems/solutions. Know what you are
> getting into before you jump in with both feet.
>
>
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
Anonymous
September 8, 2004 11:59:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

Glenn wrote:
> I thought that a "Roaming Profile" meant that a user could go from
> machine to machine and still have the same settings.
>
> Do I need something special to do that? Or, do I have the wrong
> definition of a Roaming Profile?

No... You are right. But you should have a server/domain hosting those
profiles.

I just didn't want you thinking that you could setup a Romaoing Profile
without the proper setup in the first place. =) If this sounds familar:

Start -> Programs -> Administrative Tools -> User Manager for Domains
1.. Double click on the user
2.. Click the Profiles button
3.. In the User Profile Path enter the network share location where the
profile should go
4.. Click OK
Then you are probably good to go. You can also put your default user
profile in your sysvol/netlogon share for the domain.

--
<- Shenan ->
--
The information is provided "as is", it is suggested you research for
yourself before you take any advice - you are the one ultimately
responsible for your actions/problems/solutions. Know what you are
getting into before you jump in with both feet.
September 9, 2004 2:43:15 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

I've tried doing that, and it just doesn't seem to work. I get a different
screen on each computer on log on to, along with different settings.


"Shenan Stanley" <news_helper@hushmail.com> wrote in message
news:uA$IEhglEHA.3104@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Glenn wrote:
> > I thought that a "Roaming Profile" meant that a user could go from
> > machine to machine and still have the same settings.
> >
> > Do I need something special to do that? Or, do I have the wrong
> > definition of a Roaming Profile?
>
> No... You are right. But you should have a server/domain hosting those
> profiles.
>
> I just didn't want you thinking that you could setup a Romaoing Profile
> without the proper setup in the first place. =) If this sounds familar:
>
> Start -> Programs -> Administrative Tools -> User Manager for Domains
> 1.. Double click on the user
> 2.. Click the Profiles button
> 3.. In the User Profile Path enter the network share location where the
> profile should go
> 4.. Click OK
> Then you are probably good to go. You can also put your default user
> profile in your sysvol/netlogon share for the domain.
>
> --
> <- Shenan ->
> --
> The information is provided "as is", it is suggested you research for
> yourself before you take any advice - you are the one ultimately
> responsible for your actions/problems/solutions. Know what you are
> getting into before you jump in with both feet.
>
>
!