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Questions about the vertex III 120gb max iops

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October 20, 2011 3:36:00 PM

I need an ssd to do an install of windows 7 64 which is sitting on my table right now. I was about to buy a vertex III 120gb and see that the max iops version is essentially the same price right now. I am also reading it needs to have it's firmware updated to work at all, but that that task can't be done if it is your boot drive (why else do you buy an ssd right now?).

Is there truth to that? Is there a way to deal with that if it is true?

Thanks.
a c 353 G Storage
October 20, 2011 3:54:56 PM

First, I do not recommend the OCZ Sata III SSDs (They have the lowest satifaction rate). I do recommend the Curcial M4 (with firmware 009).

(1) But to answer your question, To update the OCZ drives you would use a Linix boot disk. I used this to update the firmware on my 2 Agility III SSDs (One as Boot and one as storage). It updated both fine with no loss of info on the drives. They are currently upto ver 2.15, and I'm still not convienced they have solved their problems. From what I know it appears that they have had to sacrifice some performance for stability.

(2) DON'T look at normal benchmarks for the SSDs!!! they are very misleading when it comes to day-to-day rel life performance. The only benchmark that I even look at now are PCMark vantage which comes closer to real Life performance. You will see that the Curcial M4 does very well and Has a much HIGHER satisfaction ratio. Imn fact their latest FW revision (0009) improved performance by around 15 % (verse a decrease with newer OCZ firmware (upto 2.13 as I have not tried 2.15 yet) Also have two 128 gig M4's Love them

PCMark Vantage comparision. Note overall Vetex 3 Max is only 6 % faster and that was based on the slower 0006 FW for the m4.
http://www.anandtech.com/show/4341/ocz-vertex-3-max-iop...
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October 20, 2011 3:58:11 PM

I was about to buy an M4 a few days ago when I saw that the write speeds were something like have of the write speeds of other similar drives.

I know nothing of Linux. Are there other ways?

Thanks.
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a c 297 G Storage
October 20, 2011 4:14:11 PM

^5 +1 what Retired Chief said!!!
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a c 353 G Storage
October 20, 2011 4:26:52 PM

(1) Don't let the "word" linix bother you. I DO not use it either. It is just a diferrent operating system. You down load the ISO and burn it to a CD (As with any ISO don't just copy the file, If you drag the file to the burning software it should burn it using the proper format). Once you have created the CD, just use it as a Boot Disk (just like your window 7 installation disk) but it will look like old DOS.

If you are refering to to ADVERTIZED Sequencial performance - One word DON'T, it is very misleading.
(1) Sequencial read/write performance is the least important matrix for a OS + program drive - It is a marketing tool. . What is important are the random 4k performance, reads more more imortant than writes.
(2) The OCZ drives (SF2281 controller) have an outstanding compression algorthium which yields a high performance - But only when data that is ready compressable - again NOT real life. as the Data/files on an OS + program disk are already pretty compressed.

Comparision of M4 (FW 0009) compared to Oczs max iops Sequencial read/writes using compressed data (AS SSD Benchmark) - They are amost identical:
Ref: http://www.anandtech.com/show/4712/the-crucial-m4-ssd-u...
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a c 353 G Storage
October 20, 2011 4:30:38 PM

Added, you probably already know, but just in case:
Installation Steps:
.. Disconnect old HDD, connect New SSD.
.. Go into Bios and VERIFY that the HDD controller is set To AHCI
.. Install windows 7. Note if your system is an Intel system you will want to go to Intel’s website and download and install the latest RST drivers (ver 10.6) http://downloadcenter.intel.com/SearchResult.aspx?lang=...
Just select your Operating system and in the right pane click on drivers.
Everything is OK. Power down and reconnect your Old HDD. Note: do NOT delete anything for a couple of weeks, until you are sure everything is running fine. You will be able to dual boot to the SSD or the HDD simply by pressing the hot key during post that brings up the boot menu (F12 on my gigabyte MB and F11 on my asrock MB). You can simply copy Your favorites over from HDD -> SSD and for email you can do an export/import. After a couple of weeks you can then (1) delete windows from HDD, or (2) back up your data to BU drive and reformat your HDD and copy your data back (This is what I normally do.

3 Things that I normally do for an SSD:
.. (1) disable hibernation - save 4 -> 6 gigs
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/920730
.. (2) Set page file (virtual memory) min and max to the same value, ie 4 gigs ram set it to 1024 mb. > 4 gigs ram set to 512mb. And you can redirect it to the HDD to save alittle more (Very slight performance hit). This save upto 6 gigs
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Change...
.. (3) manage restore points. limit the number of restore point or disable. This one if not done can eat up space in the long haul.
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/3187/disable-system-rest...
.. (4) One Final Important step: Use windows 7 backup (Under Control panel -> System & Security) and creat a image backup for your “C” drive. You can place on your internal HDD (and as a added precaution copy to BU drive). As long as you have the Windows Installation disk, you do NOT need to create the “Restore Disk” when prompted.
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a c 536 G Storage
October 20, 2011 4:42:03 PM

axlrose said:
I am also reading it needs to have it's firmware updated to work at all, but that that task can't be done if it is your boot drive (why else do you buy an ssd right now?). Is there truth to that? Is there a way to deal with that if it is true?


Yes, that’s true. To update the drive you have to boot into Linux O/S.

Step 1. Download an .iso file and burn that file to a CD.
Step 2. Reboot into BIOS and change your boot order to your CD/DVD drive.
Step 3. Reboot into Linux with the CD you just burned.
Step 4. Double-click an icon that says "Update Firmware".
Step 5. Shut down pc after update completes.
Step 6. Reboot into BIOS and change your boot order back to your SSD drive.

The whole process takes less than 10 minutes (after creating the Linux boot CD).

Here’s the link for full instructions: http://www.ocztechnologyforum.com/forum/showthread.php?...


EDIT: Once you burn the Linux CD you can use it for all future firmware updates and you can also use it to Secure Erase your drive to restore fresh-out-of-the-box performance.
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October 20, 2011 8:36:21 PM

Is it safe to say the m4 being used here was a 256gb and that the higher storage capacity also seems to generally offer more speed in ssd's?
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a c 353 G Storage
October 20, 2011 8:38:04 PM

Yes, generally the higher the capacity the better the performance.
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a c 536 G Storage
October 20, 2011 8:39:18 PM

axlrose said:
Is it safe to say the m4 being used here was a 256gb and that the higher storage capacity also seems to generally offer more speed in ssd's?


Yes, a 256GB SSD will have more NAND chips in it than a 120GB SSD, which would equate to better performance.
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October 27, 2011 12:46:39 AM

128gb M4, two Sapphire Toxic 6950's, and a WD 500gb passport bu hdd should be showing up tomorrow night while I'm at parent/teacher conferences. Project for the weekend.

Thanks for the help with installation and transition ideas too. This will be my first time doing this type of data transition.
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October 30, 2011 6:18:56 AM

Is there no 2.5 inch adaptor with ssd's that don't fit into pc cases? I'm trying to install my ssd and os and gpu's tonight, but I don't have anything with my lian li x900 and I don't seem to have anything with my M4.

Thanks.
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a c 353 G Storage
October 30, 2011 1:40:34 PM

Some cases have a slot for 2.5" HDs, many don't. Some of the SSDs come with the 2.5 ->3.5 adaptor some don't. They are avalable @ newegg.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...
In a hurry, just sit it in there untill the adaptor arrives. No moving parts = No problem just sitting inside. Myself for 2 of systems I just made up a piece of metal and attached them.
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October 31, 2011 12:28:55 AM

RetiredChief said:
Added, you probably already know, but just in case:
Installation Steps:
.. Disconnect old HDD, connect New SSD.
.. Go into Bios and VERIFY that the HDD controller is set To AHCI
.. Install windows 7. Note if your system is an Intel system you will want to go to Intel’s website and download and install the latest RST drivers (ver 10.6) http://downloadcenter.intel.com/SearchResult.aspx?lang=...
Just select your Operating system and in the right pane click on drivers.
Everything is OK. Power down and reconnect your Old HDD. Note: do NOT delete anything for a couple of weeks, until you are sure everything is running fine. You will be able to dual boot to the SSD or the HDD simply by pressing the hot key during post that brings up the boot menu (F12 on my gigabyte MB and F11 on my asrock MB). You can simply copy Your favorites over from HDD -> SSD and for email you can do an export/import. After a couple of weeks you can then (1) delete windows from HDD, or (2) back up your data to BU drive and reformat your HDD and copy your data back (This is what I normally do.

3 Things that I normally do for an SSD:
.. (1) disable hibernation - save 4 -> 6 gigs
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/920730
.. (2) Set page file (virtual memory) min and max to the same value, ie 4 gigs ram set it to 1024 mb. > 4 gigs ram set to 512mb. And you can redirect it to the HDD to save alittle more (Very slight performance hit). This save upto 6 gigs
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Change...
.. (3) manage restore points. limit the number of restore point or disable. This one if not done can eat up space in the long haul.
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/3187/disable-system-rest...
.. (4) One Final Important step: Use windows 7 backup (Under Control panel -> System & Security) and creat a image backup for your “C” drive. You can place on your internal HDD (and as a added precaution copy to BU drive). As long as you have the Windows Installation disk, you do NOT need to create the “Restore Disk” when prompted.


I'm going to go see if I can find where the ahci setting is. Not realy sure about that. Also, when you say 'intel system' do you mean intel board or intel chip? I have a Yorkfield quadcore, but it's on a evga board. And can I remove the restore points later? I noticed when cleaning up my previous boot disk once that I could delete a bunch of restore points and that freed a lot of space up.

Thanks.
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a c 353 G Storage
October 31, 2011 1:38:04 AM

evge is a brand name. Since you have a Intel CPU, most likely you have a Intel chipset.

Your MB manual should show where the ahci/raide is set inbios. You can wait on the restore points, but do not let them get out of control, ie start taking up a lot of disk space.
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November 7, 2011 12:37:44 AM

Any chance it took care of the ahci on it's own?
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!