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Help with my First Computer Build

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Anonymous
November 24, 2009 12:55:16 AM
November 24, 2009 1:04:23 AM

Hmm some suggestions

1. 770 chipset
2. 4GB DDR3 1333 CL7-8 first?
3. Win 7 HP instead of Pro?
4. Consider HD 4890 if DX11 is not a must
5. Your link to PSU is dead but a rock solid 80+ certified with healthy amps on the 12V for non CF set up?

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November 24, 2009 1:06:30 AM

Ok it seems your going for a bit of a budget build, correct?
First thing I would do is change up your RAM. I would go with 4GB of the same speed RAM, and plan to upgrade later. Or go with DDR3 1333, you might save twenty bucks, and the performance difference is not huge.
You will have to decide on a a new PSU, cause the one you linked has been de-activated
I would also say go with an Intel CPU. You will for sure be spending more money, but I would recommend you just make sure you know the possible performance you might be sacrificing by switching brands. Do a bit of reading, then decide.
Defintley go with the WD Caviar Black 1TB. With the 1TB, our getting double the space for only thirty bucks more.
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Anonymous
November 24, 2009 1:18:03 AM

Yes I am going for a budget build. The computer will be used often to play downloaded HD MKV movies through HDMI on my LCD tv. Also a lot of multitasking, downloading, converting....I like to run many items in the background. What is the difference between the RAM you are talking about (DDR1333) vs. what I linked to? Why 4GB over 8GB? Is the AMD Phenom II X4 that bad? What would you recommend comparable in price from Intel? The reason I don't need a large internal hard drive is because I have many external 1TB and 1.5TB Caviar Green drives that have hundreds of MKV movies. My current computer can't handle the 1080p movies at all and 720p is choppy. This is a big factor behind this new build. Would like it to be dual purpose everyday computer as well as media server.
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Anonymous
November 24, 2009 1:31:25 AM

batuchka said:
Hmm some suggestions

1. 770 chipset
2. 4GB DDR3 1333 CL7-8 first?
3. Win 7 HP instead of Pro?
4. Consider HD 4890 if DX11 is not a must
5. Your link to PSU is dead but a rock solid 80+ certified with healthy amps on the 12V for non CF set up?

http://i137.photobucket.com/albums/q205/batuchka/xxaq.jpg


What motherboard would you recommend with the 770 chipset and why? Also why 4GB first? The HD4890 might be a good option for me. It will have no problem with my MKV files? I don't understand your 5th comment. Please elaborate.
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November 24, 2009 1:32:20 AM

Nope outside someone who does regular rendering/encoding (i7 ftw btw), for the $$ you get better performance for the $$ going AMD That a a tricore being more than enuff for a gaming rig...
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-gaming-cpu,243...
Quote:
Unfortunately for Intel, it looks like gamers building on a budget can skip over the dual-core Pentium E6500. While it certainly wasn't trounced in comparison to the other contenders, it really doesn't offer anything special. The processor might make a worthwhile upgrade from an older LGA 775-based configuration, but for those constructing new machines, the AM2+ and AM3 platforms are much more attractive and have a brighter future.

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November 24, 2009 1:36:57 AM

Yes because that Gigabyte has established itself as a small legend when it comes to clocking/unlocking with a budget board hehe
http://forums.vr-zone.com/overclocking-bazaar/466518-am...
Also for budget rigs dun worry about CF/etc - get as awesome a single GPU your budget could afford you ^^
Edit: What i meant by comment #5 - a rock solid dependable PSU is the foundation of any gaming rig
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Anonymous
November 24, 2009 2:00:43 AM

Yes I still don't quite understand how I know how many watts I need. The one I posted I found to be a good price and good reviews. That's why I chose it.
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November 24, 2009 2:11:32 AM

I would definatley agree with the AMD being the value choice, but as compared to intel's Quad core competitor (the core i5/Core 2 Quad line-ups) there is a performance decrease. I can't think of the benchmarks off the top of my head, but use your google-fu and look it up for yourself. Be sure your looking at a modern write-up, not something comparing pentiums and the amd duo cores.
The reason I recomend 4Gb instead of 8GB to start out with is because RAM is so easy to upgrade. So just make sure you start out with 4Gb of a high speed, which is quite decent in itself, and when you have some xtra cash later, buy another 4GB. The money you will save with this strategy might just be the deciding factor for a nicer GPU. (I have the 4870 1gb and can say that it is a great performer.
650W PSU will give you the power you currently need, and probably enough to carry you down the road. Make sure it has two PCI-E power connectors to support most modern video cards.
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November 24, 2009 2:15:42 AM

Quote:
Yes I still don't quite understand how I know how many watts I need. The one I posted I found to be a good price and good reviews. That's why I chose it.


I would say that Corsair VX550 is as good as it gets for price/performance and equally as important durability :p 
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November 24, 2009 2:43:27 AM

If you are multitasking, I would favor the intel i5-750 over the amd offerings.

Ram is relatively cheap, and you want enough to hold all of your concurrent tasks. Go ahead and get 8gb up front. Try to get a matched 8gb kit. Sometimes the components to build a ram stick change and a kit you add later might not match exactly. Still, it is ok to try 4gb and see if you can make use of more later.
For any ram you are considering, do your own homework.
Go to the ram vendor's web site, and access their configurator.
Corsair, Kingston, Patriot, OCZ and others have them.
Their compatibility list is more current than the motherboard vendor's QVL lists which rarely get updated.
Enter your mobo or PC, and get a list of compatible ram sticks.

Here are a few links:

http://www.crucial.com/index.aspx

http://www.corsair.com/configurator/default.aspx

http://kingston.com/

http://conf.ocztechnology.com/index.php?c=1

http://www.patriotmemory.com/configurator/index.jsp

Cpu performance is not very sensitive to ram speeds.
If you look at real application and game benchmarks(vs. synthetic tests),
you will see negligible difference in performance between the slowest DDR2 and the fastest DDR3 ram.
Perhaps 1-2%. Not worth it to me.
Don't pay extra for faster ram or better timings unless you are a maximum overclocker.

A simple way to size your psu is to get a quality unit that has the same number of 6/8 pin pcie connectors that your graphics configuration will use. Quality units come from Corsair, PC P&C, Antec, Seasonic, to name a few. A quality 500-600w unit will drive any single card well. Pick a unit in tier 2 or better from this list:
http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx
Note that HEC is a tier 5 unit. PSU problems are difficult to diagnose; you do not want to use a suspect unit. The PSU is probably the last place you want to economise.
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