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Help with OC'ing 2500k

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May 2, 2012 8:25:48 PM

i have a 2500k and a GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3. i have read so many "how to OC your 2500k" topics my head hurts. almost all of them have conflicting views and nearly none of them are using a gigabyte bios. is there one guide that may help me? even the ones above on TH's forums i don't find particularly useful. i specifically get confused around auto voltage and RAM voltage settings. i haven't touched the bios since i built the computer 2 months ago.

btw i don't want to deter from stock voltage right now, so i want to get somewhere around 4.0 ghz without making vcore changes. any help is appreciated.

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May 3, 2012 1:51:29 AM

Any particular reason you even want to OC? Are you just experimenting, or is this for a reason?

I don't mean to deter you, but for gaming stock speeds on a i5 2500K are more than adaquate to run anything out there. Also, if you're having difficultly with OC'ing terms then you'll need to do some more reading. It really is important to have a least a basic understanding of what's going on when applying an OC.

So, legal disclaimer out of the way...

Always leave RAM set at 1.50V. Up to 1.65V may be safely used long term, but there should be no reason to do so as RAM OC'ing doesn't yield much these days. 1333MHz, or 1600Mhz with CAS 9 timing or less is all you need.

There are two main methods of OC'ing on the SB/IB platform. First, you can change the system bus multiplier, which is a simple multiplier for the 100MHz system bus (i.e. if multplier = 33, then 100MHzx33=3,300MHz). Doing this changes the base CPU frequency and typically results in the turbo frequency features being disabled (if multiplier is > 37 in your case) and the CPU running at a single constant speed regardless of how many cores are active. The CPU will still be able to throttle down to low power mode (1.6GHz) as well as long as power saving features like Intel SpeedStep, C1E, or C-State features aren't disabled (default is on). As long as you stay below 4.0GHz or so then you should be able to leave CPU voltage on Auto with no problems.

The second method, and the one I like best, involves messing with the Turbo Boost frequency settings. Somewhere in your BIOS you'll be able to adjust the turbo frequencies, for a 2500K there will be four settings each one corresponding to four, three, two or one core being active (stock is 4 Core = 34, 3 Cores = 35, 2 Cores = 36, 1 Core = 37). Jacking these up allows you to control the frequency under load and still maintain a low power state at light loads and gives you more control over what kind of speeds you want to see with x amount of cores busy. You might try something like 36, 38, 40, 42 for these.

What's really fun is combinging both methods. Setting a low system multiplier of around 25 or so gives you all the speed you need putzing around on the desktop or while watching movies, or using the web, but then setting high Turbo multipliers gives you the performance you need/want during heavy loads. It's kind of like mimicking Intel's 2400S CPU but with mad crazy high turbo frequencies.

Anyways, hope that helped some. I can't be super specific as I'm running an MSI board, but let me know if you have specific questions about settings and I'll do my best to get you up and running.
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May 3, 2012 6:32:36 AM

I'm very new to this OC thing, but I do have my 2500k runnin at 4.53. This is probably far too simple plus I'm using an ASUS board but maybe jsut try bumping your turbo cores to 39-40 to achieve what you're looking for. Any vets be sure to shoot me down if I'm wrong.

Edit: I have had no stability issues and my voltage is on auto.
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a c 283 à CPUs
a c 110 K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 7:07:35 AM

Oropher said:
I'm very new to this OC thing, but I do have my 2500k runnin at 4.53. This is probably far too simple plus I'm using an ASUS board but maybe jsut try bumping your turbo cores to 39-40 to achieve what you're looking for. Any vets be sure to shoot me down if I'm wrong.

Edit: I have had no stability issues and my voltage is on auto.


One question for you, if you don't mind. Why are you OC'ing the BCLK? Just bump the multi up to 45 or 46, if that's what you want. No reason to touch the BCLK at all. It may be fine at 103, but there's just no reason to do it with a 2500K.

Also, I just OC with the main multi myself, since I run a 24/7 OC (always at 4.5, unless I'm not using it, then I turn on the Balanced power profile in Windows to let it clock down).
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a c 95 à CPUs
a c 225 K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 12:45:02 PM

tuffluck said:
i have a 2500k and a GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3. i have read so many "how to OC your 2500k" topics my head hurts. almost all of them have conflicting views and nearly none of them are using a gigabyte bios. is there one guide that may help me? even the ones above on TH's forums i don't find particularly useful. i specifically get confused around auto voltage and RAM voltage settings. i haven't touched the bios since i built the computer 2 months ago.

btw i don't want to deter from stock voltage right now, so i want to get somewhere around 4.0 ghz without making vcore changes. any help is appreciated.


87ninefiveone said:
Also, if you're having difficultly with OC'ing terms then you'll need to do some more reading. It really is important to have a least a basic understanding of what's going on when applying an OC.


Excellent Statement!

@tuffluck

Maybe you should stick to your motherboards automatic overclocking features, because if you want to overclock, but not deter from your stock voltage right now, you're not going to get any further than your motherboards built in auto overclock features, and that may be your safest and simplest option.

The guides up top, mrfaces guide was based on an MSI motherboard, my guide was based on an ASRock motherboard, unfortunately neither guide is really newbie friendly.

THGF users have used those guides to arrive at some impressive overclocks, if 4.0ghz is all you're after you should be able to reach that with stock voltage.

With some motherboards you may be shocked at what the stock voltage may jump up to out in the operating system, it would be to your advantage to learn as much about overclocking your platform as you possibly could, because you can also learn to control the voltage in the operating system.

Avoiding seriously high voltage spikes out in the operating system will always be to your advantage, as for as hardware longevity is concerned, CPU and motherboard manufacturers don't actually want their products to last forever, if they did, eventually the market demand would end, think about that.

I'm referencing non high overclocked machines with that statement, I've seen with my own setup with the voltage left on Auto with a simple 4.0ghz overclock spiking to 1.520v in the operating system, that should not be happening, that is way too much voltage for a 4.0ghz overclock.

With 1.520v (Intels max tested voltage with the Sandy Bridge platform), I can run 5.1ghz with fixed voltage, what's wrong with this picture?

Relating one motherboards BIOS terminology to a different brands motherboard shouldn't be difficult at all, for those of us that know 100% what they are doing.

It would be a great day for us all, if all motherboard producers decided to adopt a common BIOS terminology for all motherboards, but until that day arrives you can always Google the different terms.
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May 3, 2012 3:43:36 PM

thanks for the responses. i wouldn't say i'm a noob at doing this as i have done it on an older system. but newer systems have newer settings, and it's hard to say which are more preferable than others.

nevertheless, i figured it out for the most part. it have it running at 4.4ghz @ 1.25v. the question i have now is that i have load line calibration set to level 5 (to adjust for vdroop) but manual vcore set to 1.25v. aren't the two sort of conflicting settings since LLC adjusts the vcore automatically? CPU-z shows 1.29v at idle and 1.248v at load, and neither are 1.25v. i just want to know if it's safe to have the LLC on, without knowing the true voltage it is running at all the time.

any help is greatly appreciated!
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a c 95 à CPUs
a c 225 K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 4:55:34 PM

No offense regarding the noobie comment.

I run LLC level 1 on my ASRock M/B however my level 1 is as close as possible to a 1 to 1 ratio, where as I don't know if Gigabytes level 1 is 1 to 1 or level 5 is 1 to 1, thus my comment.

Quote:
It would be a great day for us all, if all motherboard producers decided to adopt a common BIOS terminology for all motherboards, but until that day arrives you can always Google the different terms.


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May 4, 2012 4:53:16 PM

4Ryan6 said:
No offense regarding the noobie comment.

I run LLC level 1 on my ASRock M/B however my level 1 is as close as possible to a 1 to 1 ratio, where as I don't know if Gigabytes level 1 is 1 to 1 or level 5 is 1 to 1, thus my comment.

Quote:
It would be a great day for us all, if all motherboard producers decided to adopt a common BIOS terminology for all motherboards, but until that day arrives you can always Google the different terms.


thanks. for some reason my 2500k at default bios setting shows a vcore of 1.36, which is pretty much unbelievable to me. nevertheless i used the offset feature in the bios and set it to -.11, so my vcore should be 1.25v. i clocked it to 4.2ghz and now when i go into windows it idles at .9v and it reaches only 1.20v at load according to cpu-z. i assume the 1.20v vs. 1.25v that i set it at in the bios is due to vdroop and the LLC could fix that, however it runs stable 4.2 @ 1.2v after hours of stress testing, so i think i am sitting just fine, and with no LLC setting.

so why the heck is my stock voltage for the 2500k saying 1.36v. doesn't that seem absurdly high to anyone for stock? is it possible my mobo defaulted to the vcore even though it's not the default vcore for the chip?
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a c 95 à CPUs
a c 225 K Overclocking
May 4, 2012 5:24:20 PM

Your motherboard is automatically doing that.
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a c 146 à CPUs
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May 4, 2012 6:27:54 PM

I set the CPU Vcore at 1.3V(I try set the auto too,it work fine), and multi-steps Load-line at 3. I do OC my at 4.0GHZ.
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