Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Watercooled PC - i7 980x - GTX 680 Hydro Copper

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
May 2, 2012 8:49:45 PM

Hey there!
I just realized that I am seriously sick of the amount of noise my computer makes. I have a Corsair 800D with a total of 9 fans (including power supply, graphics card, processor cooling). So I decided to change to water cooling.

I am rather new at water cooling although I have used a H70 on one of my older builds.
My Setup:
Motherboard: Asus Rampage III Formula
Ram: 6GB DDR3 2000 MHz Corsair Dominator (Going to upgrade to 12gb)
Power Supply: Corsair 1000Watt HX1000w
Hard Drives: 2x 1TB Western Digital Green Caviar (Going to buy a Solid State Drive for the Operating System)
Processor: Currently an i7 930 (Going to upgrade to an i7 980x)

I am currently using a Asus GTX 470, but if I am going to water-cool the PC more or less completely, then I will be buying a couple of EVGA 680(or the future 690) Hydro Copper's. I'm not quite sure about how the connections would be and stuff though.

What I was thinking was having a large Radiator at the top of the case with 3 fans on top running at low speeds, and the reservoir connected to the Processor and the Graphics Card.

So basically as I am not the brightest mind when it comes to water cooling, I thought you guys could help me out by Recommending me a Cooling setup.

Cheers,
Alexander.
a b K Overclocking
May 2, 2012 9:37:34 PM

You might want to get an i7-970 instead of a 980X. It can overclock pretty much equally, but should be hundreds of dollars cheaper.

I would recommend multiple 7970s over multiple 680s, unless you get 680s that have 4GB of VRAM because the 680 only has 2GB by default and that is just not enough for a very high end build.

Use the money you saved from the i7-970 and get a large SSD, maybe a 256GB. You can then fit more than just the OS on it, such as games. It may improve some stutter problems and will drastically improve loading times.

As for the cooling, I can't be of much help there.
a c 324 K Overclocking
May 2, 2012 9:42:54 PM

I highly recommend reading through the watercooling sticky and links provided within- there is a lot of data throughout, which you'll find very helpful to start to understand what you are looking at. It really isn't as easy as buying some blocks, a pump, fittings and just picking any radiator and expect specific results.

What is your overall watercooling hardware budget? Any reason why the Hydrocopper blocks, or this was just something you initially came across?

Sticky is linked in my signature below.
Related resources
a b K Overclocking
May 2, 2012 9:50:52 PM

well with quiet systems like the ones I build, they may require a little more radiator than just one. the high flow push pull systems for radiators remove a lot more heat and require less radiator but they tend to be loud. I sleep in the same room with one of these computers, but I have 3 double stack 120 mm radiators for cooling pretty much everything you can water cool on a computer. I use the MCR220 quite power radiators with low rpm fans it is almost a passive system but it does keep the components cool.
May 3, 2012 2:01:33 PM

blazorthon said:
You might want to get an i7-970 instead of a 980X. It can overclock pretty much equally, but should be hundreds of dollars cheaper.

I would recommend multiple 7970s over multiple 680s, unless you get 680s that have 4GB of VRAM because the 680 only has 2GB by default and that is just not enough for a very high end build.

Use the money you saved from the i7-970 and get a large SSD, maybe a 256GB. You can then fit more than just the OS on it, such as games. It may improve some stutter problems and will drastically improve loading times.

As for the cooling, I can't be of much help there.


sure, maybe I'll get the 970 :) 
The reason I am getting the Hydro Copper is because its a pre-buildt watercooled gpu. Unless you can find 7970's with prebuildt waterblocks then im sticking to the 680/690.
And I have plenty of money so I will be getting atleast a 256gb ssd. :) 
May 3, 2012 2:11:38 PM

rubix_1011 said:
I highly recommend reading through the watercooling sticky and links provided within- there is a lot of data throughout, which you'll find very helpful to start to understand what you are looking at. It really isn't as easy as buying some blocks, a pump, fittings and just picking any radiator and expect specific results.

What is your overall watercooling hardware budget? Any reason why the Hydrocopper blocks, or this was just something you initially came across?

Sticky is linked in my signature below.


I actually read that, but I really can't go into information about all different graphics card blocks, I really want you guys to personally help me out here :D 
My total budget minus the price of the graphics card, solid state drive and processor. I have about <1000 US. Dollars.
It can although be higher if necessary, but preferably within the under 750 range.
I live in Norway by the way, so I need websites where I can order from.
(The Currency I use is Norwegian Kroner aka NOK)

100USD = 575,- NOK
250USD = 1450,- NOK
500USD = 2870,- NOK
750USD = 4300,- NOK
1000USD = 5750,- NOK
May 3, 2012 2:15:49 PM

toolmaker_03 said:
well with quiet systems like the ones I build, they may require a little more radiator than just one. the high flow push pull systems for radiators remove a lot more heat and require less radiator but they tend to be loud. I sleep in the same room with one of these computers, but I have 3 double stack 120 mm radiators for cooling pretty much everything you can water cool on a computer. I use the MCR220 quite power radiators with low rpm fans it is almost a passive system but it does keep the components cool.

I really don't mind the amount of radiators, as long as they all cover the top 3 fans on the case (http://bit.ly/Iuc9qM).
I'm not sure if I should have the radiator on the inside or outside, although I think its more practical having the inside, but cooler to have them on the outside and blowing air in.

Any ideas as to how many of what radiator ? :) 
a b K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 3:07:56 PM

2 MCR 320 quite power would cover what you want to cool or a 4 stack, and a 2 stack, or 3 2 stack radiators. does that make since? they do make extreme radiators that could do the job with just one.
http://www.frozencpu.com/cat/l3/g30/c95/s667/list/p1/Li...
but the only one I have ever used is the phobya extreme 1080 radiator and it was in a case designed for it along with two other radiators it was a fun build.
a c 324 K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 3:18:31 PM

You don't want Swiftech stack rads...no point in sandwiching rads as you lose almost 40% cooling ability of the 2nd rad. I'm assuming you are meaning running 2 rads in a 'sandwich'...fans, rad, fans, rad, fans...or even rad, fans, rad. This is a very poor solution for using 2 radiators.

Also, there are better radiators for the money than Swiftech MCR's- this coming from someone that owns and runs two MCR320's, myself.
a b K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 4:07:03 PM

well no, I don't run any rad in a sandwich, I use stand off's and 2 fans on each rad. I have one mounted on the back, and two mounted on the side, side by side, right next to each other.
May 3, 2012 4:24:24 PM

I usually recommend 2 120mm fans for each piece of equipment. So a 240 RAD for the CPU. If you want to add the GPU, another 240 RAD. If you want to get a high end all copper dual pass radiator, you can get away with a 360RAD.

You could also just get an H100 for your CPU and then build a small closed loop system for the GPU. I'd use 1/2" OD tubing with compression nozzles.
a c 324 K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 4:27:24 PM

A better solution would be to calculate your loop TDP accurately and choose radiators and size accordingly.
May 3, 2012 4:59:22 PM

rubix_1011 said:
A better solution would be to calculate your loop TDP accurately and choose radiators and size accordingly.

whats TDP ?
a b K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 5:55:34 PM

pivotax said:
whats TDP ?


Total Displacement of Power, if I remember correctly. It refers to the maximum power usage of a electronic device. For example, the GTX 680 has a 195 watt TDP at stock, reference performance and the i7-970 has a TDP of 125w at stock performance (could climb over well over 200w when overclocked). This is important because higher power usage means higher heat generation and a cooling system needs to be able to handle all of the heat.

Most parts don't get to their TDP unless you fully load them. However, that is a fairly likely situation on a gaming machine such as this, so plan your cooling accordingly.
a b K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 5:59:22 PM

pivotax said:
sure, maybe I'll get the 970 :) 
The reason I am getting the Hydro Copper is because its a pre-buildt watercooled gpu. Unless you can find 7970's with prebuildt waterblocks then im sticking to the 680/690.
And I have plenty of money so I will be getting atleast a 256gb ssd. :) 


Here's a 7970 with a water block pre-installed on newegg:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
a b K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 6:14:27 PM

pivotax said:
Oh great! Thanks allot! :) 


Glad to help, even if I can't do much for you with the cooling. I've little experience with liquid cooling myself and only know some basics on it.
May 3, 2012 6:29:45 PM

blazorthon said:
Total Displacement of Power, if I remember correctly. It refers to the maximum power usage of a electronic device. For example, the GTX 680 has a 195 watt TDP at stock, reference performance and the i7-970 has a TDP of 125w at stock performance (could climb over well over 200w when overclocked). This is important because higher power usage means higher heat generation and a cooling system needs to be able to handle all of the heat.

Most parts don't get to their TDP unless you fully load them. However, that is a fairly likely situation on a gaming machine such as this, so plan your cooling accordingly.


Alright well using the Total Displacement of Power Calculator here: http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
If I include everything like the 970 and 2x 7970's and 1 solid state drive and more ram, then I come to a total usage of 724 watt (at full load on processor, graphics card and such).
Total consumption: 724W
Recommended: 774W
So that leaves me with 226-276W left for the water-cooling.
I'm not familiar with the power consumption of water coolers, so might I have to upgrade my power supply? (No problem if I have to, I could probably buy a 1500Watt Power Supply as future component will probably need more electricity)
a b K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 6:45:18 PM

pivotax said:
Alright well using the Total Displacement of Power Calculator here: http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
If I include everything like the 970 and 2x 7970's and 1 solid state drive and more ram, then I come to a total usage of 724 watt (at full load on processor, graphics card and such).
Total consumption: 724W
Recommended: 774W
So that leaves me with 226-276W left for the water-cooling.
I'm not familiar with the power consumption of water coolers, so might I have to upgrade my power supply? (No problem if I have to, I could probably buy a 1500Watt Power Supply as future component will probably need more electricity)


Coolers don't use much power at all. The problem with using coolers that can handle the TDP meant having a cooler that can handle the heat given off by parts that use at most, the amount of energy measured in TDP. With 774w recommended as a minimum, I'd pick up a PSU rated for around 1000 watts, aka 1KW, maybe up to a 1.2KW PSU. Remember, if you are going to overclock that 970, it will use a lot more power. If the 7970s get overclocked, they will also use more power. If you overclock your RAM or just use high power consumption RAM, then it too will increase power usage a little.
May 3, 2012 6:54:16 PM

blazorthon said:
Coolers don't use much power at all. The problem with using coolers that can handle the TDP meant having a cooler that can handle the heat given off by parts that use at most, the amount of energy measured in TDP. With 774w recommended as a minimum, I'd pick up a PSU rated for around 1000 watts, aka 1KW.


Oh alright, I must have misunderstood. Could you help me find a cooling system?
May 3, 2012 6:58:00 PM

blazorthon said:
You might want to get an i7-970 instead of a 980X. It can overclock pretty much equally, but should be hundreds of dollars cheaper.

I would recommend multiple 7970s over multiple 680s, unless you get 680s that have 4GB of VRAM because the 680 only has 2GB by default and that is just not enough for a very high end build.

Use the money you saved from the i7-970 and get a large SSD, maybe a 256GB. You can then fit more than just the OS on it, such as games. It may improve some stutter problems and will drastically improve loading times.

As for the cooling, I can't be of much help there.



You would think that this would be the case for the 7970's over the 680's due to the diff in VRAM, but it is actually FALSE!!
If you're skeptical which I would imagine, here is a good solid review.

http://www.hardocp.com/article/2012/04/25/geforce_gtx_6...

I think it pretty much boils down to drivers tbh. Nvidias driver team absolutely wipes the floor with AMD's, and essentially they are just being more efficient with their hardware.


Also I believe TDP is Thermal Design Power.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_design_power

a b K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 7:33:48 PM

rdzona said:
You would think that this would be the case for the 7970's over the 680's due to the diff in VRAM, but it is actually FALSE!!
If you're skeptical which I would imagine, here is a good solid review.

http://www.hardocp.com/article/2012/04/25/geforce_gtx_6...

I think it pretty much boils down to drivers tbh. Nvidias driver team absolutely wipes the floor with AMD's, and essentially they are just being more efficient with their hardware.


Also I believe TDP is Thermal Design Power.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_design_power


Thermal design power then, what it stands for does not realy change anything, but thanks for the clarification.

Also, right from that link you gave me,


Quote:
With the GeForce GTX 680 3-Way SLI, we have to keep in mind the 2GB of VRAM per GPU supported on each video card. We found that we could easily set "Ultra" settings at 5760x1200. We then turned on FXAA in-game and found performance to be more than playable. We had so much performance left over that we tried to turn on 2X MSAA and then 4X MSAA. This is where we ran into issues with GTX 680 Tri-Fire. When we enabled 2X MSAA at 5760x1200 the game started exhibiting sluggish behavior as if the game were pausing or slowing down as we played. The game would slow down, speed up, slow down, and speed up. It was a feeling of utter unplayability. However, the framerate didn't quite show this slowdown or sluggishness. This is one of those times where the framerate doesn't show the whole picture. Suffice it to say, 2X MSAA at 5760x1200 was unplayable on GTX 680 3-Way SLI in this game. When we pushed the game further to 4X MSAA, it was completely bottlenecked and it finally showed in the framerate, which we will show below.


And the how the 7970s took it:

Quote:
First let's start with the Radeon HD 7970 Tri-Fire CrossFireX configuration. We found that the single player part of this game was playable with all "Ultra" settings at 5760x1200. We were also able to turn on the shader AA the game supports, which is FXAA. We had plenty of performance left, and tried to turn on 2X and 4X MSAA on top of FXAA. We were not surprised to find that 4X AA +FXAA (the game's highest possible AA settings) was playable on Radeon HD 7970 Tri-Fire. Each HD 7970 video card does after all have 3GB of VRAM per GPU. This was enough to give us 2X MSAA and 4X MSAA at 5760x1200 without any texture or graphics hitching. This level of image quality was playable with HD 7970 Tri-Fire in Eyefinity.


Please don't tell me that when 1GB can limit 1080p, that you though that doubling the VRAM and tripling the pixel count would not be a problem compared to tripling the VRAM with the pixel count.

However, I can admit that they did see something wrong,

Quote:
Therefore, the highest possible setting we could use with GTX 680 3-Way SLI was simply FXAA and no level of MSAA at all. However, even though the Radeon HD 7970 Tri-Fire was playable at 4X AA, it was literally night and day in the difference between smoothness between SLI and CrossFireX. The GTX 680 3-Way SLI configuration felt smoother, and more fluid as we played the game. The same was also true for Multiplayer, which we will talk about on the next page.


If the 7970's AA was brought down to the 680's level, then this smoothness problem might be fixed. Perhaps some more research is called for. Considering that these 7970s are using the original drivers, perhaps the fixed version will solve this completely. Either way, PivotAX, this is your system, you do what you want with it. I simply offered up another solution. If you plan on going beyond triple 1080p, then expect the 680 to become FAR more memory bottlenecked and then be next to useless. It's 2GB is struggling to let it play at 5760x1200, so any resolution higher than this will grind the 680s down to a halt.

Like I said, if 4GB 680s are an option, then they have the best of both worlds (as of right now) when it comes to smoothness and picture quality because they can use AA better than FXAA due to them not having a memory capacity bottle-neck.
a c 324 K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 8:43:19 PM

Quote:
Alright well using the Total Displacement of Power Calculator here: http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
If I include everything like the 970 and 2x 7970's and 1 solid state drive and more ram, then I come to a total usage of 724 watt (at full load on processor, graphics card and such).
Total consumption: 724W
Recommended: 774W
So that leaves me with 226-276W left for the water-cooling.
I'm not familiar with the power consumption of water coolers, so might I have to upgrade my power supply? (No problem if I have to, I could probably buy a 1500Watt Power Supply as future component will probably need more electricity)


The TDP of your system components and their power supply requirements isn't going to be the same TDP calculation for cooling. You only need to calculate TDP of the components in your watercooling loop.

GTX 680 TDP = 195watts @ stock (each)
i7-980x TDP = 130 watts @ stock

You are looking at approximately 520 watts for stock speeds to watercool two GTX 680s and a single i7-908x. If you overclock any of these components, your TDP obviously increases and you need more cooling potential. Most decent 3x120 radiators will dissipate around 525-575 watts of heat with 3x 1800rpm fans (you'll know this if you've read through Skinnee and Martin's radiator tests and results...also linked in the sticky).

You'll need at least 1 good 3x120 rad...maybe more, depending on the actual delta-T you wish to run, pump flow rate, fans used and actual radiator chosen.

You could even take 85-90% of that TDP for cooling estimation as power watts consumed is not a 1:1 for heat watts being created and output, but it's a ballpark relation.

Quote:
I actually read that


If you had, you'd have read through the large section on how to calculate your TDP.


May 3, 2012 9:00:19 PM

rubix_1011 said:
Quote:
Alright well using the Total Displacement of Power Calculator here: http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
If I include everything like the 970 and 2x 7970's and 1 solid state drive and more ram, then I come to a total usage of 724 watt (at full load on processor, graphics card and such).
Total consumption: 724W
Recommended: 774W
So that leaves me with 226-276W left for the water-cooling.
I'm not familiar with the power consumption of water coolers, so might I have to upgrade my power supply? (No problem if I have to, I could probably buy a 1500Watt Power Supply as future component will probably need more electricity)


The TDP of your system components and their power supply requirements isn't going to be the same TDP calculation for cooling. You only need to calculate TDP of the components in your watercooling loop.

GTX 680 TDP = 195watts @ stock (each)
i7-980x TDP = 130 watts @ stock

You are looking at approximately 520 watts for stock speeds to watercool two GTX 680s and a single i7-908x. If you overclock any of these components, your TDP obviously increases and you need more cooling potential. Most decent 3x120 radiators will dissipate around 525-575 watts of heat with 3x 1800rpm fans (you'll know this if you've read through Skinnee and Martin's radiator tests and results...also linked in the sticky).

You'll need at least 1 good 3x120 rad...maybe more, depending on the actual delta-T you wish to run, pump flow rate, fans used and actual radiator chosen.

You could even take 85-90% of that TDP for cooling estimation as power watts consumed is not a 1:1 for heat watts being created and output, but it's a ballpark relation.

Quote:
I actually read that


If you had, you'd have read through the large section on how to calculate your TDP.

By saying I had read it I did mean that I had read it, but no I didn't read through precisely and on every link there was, as there was plenty..
But thanks allot, it's very helpful info :) 
a b K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 9:02:33 PM

rubix_1011 said:
Quote:
Alright well using the Total Displacement of Power Calculator here: http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
If I include everything like the 970 and 2x 7970's and 1 solid state drive and more ram, then I come to a total usage of 724 watt (at full load on processor, graphics card and such).
Total consumption: 724W
Recommended: 774W
So that leaves me with 226-276W left for the water-cooling.
I'm not familiar with the power consumption of water coolers, so might I have to upgrade my power supply? (No problem if I have to, I could probably buy a 1500Watt Power Supply as future component will probably need more electricity)


The TDP of your system components and their power supply requirements isn't going to be the same TDP calculation for cooling. You only need to calculate TDP of the components in your watercooling loop.

GTX 680 TDP = 195watts @ stock (each)
i7-980x TDP = 130 watts @ stock

You are looking at approximately 520 watts for stock speeds to watercool two GTX 680s and a single i7-908x. If you overclock any of these components, your TDP obviously increases and you need more cooling potential. Most decent 3x120 radiators will dissipate around 525-575 watts of heat with 3x 1800rpm fans (you'll know this if you've read through Skinnee and Martin's radiator tests and results...also linked in the sticky).

You'll need at least 1 good 3x120 rad...maybe more, depending on the actual delta-T you wish to run, pump flow rate, fans used and actual radiator chosen.

You could even take 85-90% of that TDP for cooling estimation as power watts consumed is not a 1:1 for heat watts being created and output, but it's a ballpark relation.

Quote:
I actually read that


If you had, you'd have read through the large section on how to calculate your TDP.


Don't forget, 7970s are being considered (even if they haven't been chosen over 680s or not) and the CPU is supposed to get an overclock to well over 4.5GHz. Also, how loud would three 1800rpm 120mm fans be? I don't think it would be too quiet, but I assume that it would depend on the fans and rads. Noise is a critical consideration here. Based on this stuff, I'm thinking that five or six 120 rads (or something like that) would be the preferred option. More cooling and it should allow quieter function.
a c 324 K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 9:28:04 PM

Quote:
Don't forget, 7970s are being considered (even if they haven't been chosen over 680s or not) and the CPU is supposed to get an overclock to well over 4.5GHz. Also, how loud would three 1800rpm 120mm fans be? I don't think it would be too quiet, but I assume that it would depend on the fans and rads. Noise is a critical consideration here. Based on this stuff, I'm thinking that five or six 120 rads (or something like that) would be the preferred option. More cooling and it should allow quieter function.



I was providing bare-minimum cooling, but yes, you are correct.

The same TDP calculation still applies with the 7970's in the mix...just do some easy math and voila. Also- there is a section in the sticky that accounts for overclocking a CPU and how to determine TDP @ a specific clock speed. Again, this is a pretty good way to get a grasp on potentially how much power a CPU will require and ultimately, an estimate on heat in watts of output. It's a bit old, but it can still offer a great ballpark figure.

Depending on delta-T desired, you'd likely need more radiators, as lower fan speed lowers the cooling potential of a radiator; you'd need more radiator surface area to make up for the drop in cooling potential provided by lower speed fans.

Most people end up running more than one radiator with a setup like this anyway. Knowing what you'll actually need in order to cool a specific set of hardware to conditions that you expect is what I'm trying to get across.
a b K Overclocking
May 3, 2012 9:52:22 PM

a fan controller can allow you to lower the fan speed of your fans or even turn them off completely when you're not gaming. of course check your temps, but at idol even without fans on, you should be fine with temps under water cooling and not clocked.
!