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The 'Golden Chip' how much would you pay?

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February 8, 2010 9:53:35 AM

Hey i am looking at buying i7 920. This baby runs 24/7 at 4ghz on air, seller has only had for a few weeks (I am certain of this). How much would you pay? Thanks for all help guys i am still newb at building pc's.

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February 8, 2010 10:00:22 AM

You can get most i7's to 4Ghz with not to much work.
Get a new chip, there is no extra value in his.
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February 8, 2010 10:05:34 AM

ok thanks, a touch off topic, do you think constantly having this model chip overclocked will significantly decrease its lifetime? (on air at 4ghz...voltage has not been altered and i am unsure of temp.)
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February 8, 2010 10:10:36 AM

Well overclocking it will deffinatly
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February 8, 2010 10:13:01 AM

martyboy2222 said:
ok thanks, a touch off topic, do you think constantly having this model chip overclocked will significantly decrease its lifetime? (on air at 4ghz...voltage has not been altered and i am unsure of temp.)


Well by judging everyone else cpus that has been over clock, i dont think you'll have to worry about a thing. Scene the cpu is the highest quality part in your computer, it will most likely be the last thing to fail even at an overclock.

Now before overclocking, Every one recommend when your doing a high overclock is to get an aftermarket cooled as the stock cooler that come with the cpu will not handle the extra heat as well.
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February 8, 2010 11:22:13 AM

If you don't raise voltages, it will not significantly change the lifetime of the chip. After all, it _is_ working at stock voltage but higher clocks. The problems arise when you start raising voltages.
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February 8, 2010 1:46:18 PM

warmon6 said:
Well by judging everyone else cpus that has been over clock, i dont think you'll have to worry about a thing. Scene the cpu is the highest quality part in your computer, it will most likely be the last thing to fail even at an overclock.


No. You can easily destroy a CPU by overclocking. One of the writers of this website managed to kill a brand-new Pentium G6950 in a matter of hours in an overclocking run.

Also, the CPU is likely not the most complex part in your computer, nor is it probably the highest-quality part. Any midrange or better GPU is considerably more complex than even a high-end CPU. A Core i7 920 has about 750 million transistors, while a Radeon HD 5870 has over two billion. The memory interfaces on GPUs are often much more complex than on CPUs as well. Many GPUs also wear a lifetime warranty, whereas CPUs are warranted for 3-5 years.

Quote:
Now before overclocking, Every one recommend when your doing a high overclock is to get an aftermarket cooled as the stock cooler that come with the cpu will not handle the extra heat as well.


Correct. Intel stock coolers in particular are notoriously horrible for handling the extra heat of overclocking. Some Intel stock coolers can't even handle running the CPU at stock speeds, let alone overclocked. Getting a larger, more-powerful aftermarket cooler is absolutely recommended.

gracefully said:
If you don't raise voltages, it will not significantly change the lifetime of the chip. After all, it _is_ working at stock voltage but higher clocks. The problems arise when you start raising voltages.


Raising the voltage will shorten the life of the chip, but so will operating at an elevated temperature due to changing electrical properties of the silicon die at differing temperatures.
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February 8, 2010 3:20:12 PM

MU_Engineer said:
No. You can easily destroy a CPU by overclocking. One of the writers of this website managed to kill a brand-new Pentium G6950 in a matter of hours in an overclocking run.


I was meaning for reaching the 4GHz. I didn't include voltage changes as everyone else already covered that you wont need much voltage change to get to that speed.

As for overclocking the Pentium G6950, that was due to voltages being set way to high for the cpu. Had nothing to do with speed, as PsychoSaysDie showed with his core i3 540


Quote:
Also, the CPU is likely not the most complex part in your computer, nor is it probably the highest-quality part. Any midrange or better GPU is considerably more complex than even a high-end CPU. A Core i7 920 has about 750 million transistors, while a Radeon HD 5870 has over two billion. The memory interfaces on GPUs are often much more complex than on CPUs as well. Many GPUs also wear a lifetime warranty, whereas CPUs are warranted for 3-5 years.


I never said anything about complexity but scence you brought it up, if we look back in history, the more complex something is, the more likely it is to fail.



Also warranties, really mean nothing for the quality of the hardware..... it just means how long it should last before failing. I can have something with limited lifetime warranty and fail all the time then i could have a have a 3 month warranty and last me 10 years.

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February 9, 2010 8:33:40 AM

Best answer selected by martyboy2222.
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