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Dual channel vs single channel ddr3

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Anonymous
a b } Memory
a b V Motherboard
June 5, 2010 2:15:42 PM

Hello,
i am planning to purchse dp45sg intel motherboard which requires ddr3 1333 memory, but i am not able to understand difference among single channel, dual channel and tripple channel ddr3 memory. which one i should buy for this mobo
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b } Memory
a c 117 V Motherboard
June 5, 2010 2:22:54 PM

That mobo takes Four 240-pin DDR3 SDRAM Dual Inline Memory Modules
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a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 81 } Memory
a c 236 V Motherboard
June 5, 2010 2:51:31 PM

Install 2 or 4 memory modules for dual-channel mode.
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a b V Motherboard
June 5, 2010 3:23:02 PM

Quote:
Hello,
i am planning to purchse dp45sg intel motherboard which requires ddr3 1333 memory, but i am not able to understand difference among single channel, dual channel and tripple channel ddr3 memory. which one i should buy for this mobo

The difference between the RAMs as you asked are as follows:
1. Single - applies when you only have 1 stick of RAM.
2. Dual - applies when you have 2 sticks of RAM ( preferably identical speed and latency ). You can usually buy it as a bundle. Used for AMD motherboards and Intel 1156 and older chipsets.
3. Triple - applies when you have 3 sticks of RAM. Again preferably identical speed and latency. Used for 1366 motherboards.

2nd point, that is a bad motherboard (dp45sg) to pick. See this:
http://www.newegg.com/product/product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

May I ask why do you select an LGA 775 motherboard? Are you reusing an LGA 775 CPU? If not, why don't you go AMD AM3 motherboard or 1156 both which will support DDR3 1333 memory.




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Anonymous
a b } Memory
a b V Motherboard
June 6, 2010 3:25:26 PM

randomkid said:
The difference between the RAMs as you asked are as follows:
1. Single - applies when you only have 1 stick of RAM.
2. Dual - applies when you have 2 sticks of RAM ( preferably identical speed and latency ). You can usually buy it as a bundle. Used for AMD motherboards and Intel 1156 and older chipsets.
3. Triple - applies when you have 3 sticks of RAM. Again preferably identical speed and latency. Used for 1366 motherboards.

2nd point, that is a bad motherboard (dp45sg) to pick. See this:
http://www.newegg.com/product/product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

May I ask why do you select an LGA 775 motherboard? Are you reusing an LGA 775 CPU? If not, why don't you go AMD AM3 motherboard or 1156 both which will support DDR3 1333 memory.


Thank you,

I am upgrading my system to accomodate the XFX5770 graphic cardwhch requires PCIe2.0 slot, however my current mother board (DG965RYCK-intel) does not have this slot, i am using my processor core 2 duo 2.4 GHz which is LGA775.
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a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 81 } Memory
a c 236 V Motherboard
June 6, 2010 3:37:05 PM

Are you saying that the XFX5770 graphic card doesn't work in your DG965RYCK? They should be backward compatible with PCIe 1.1 slots.
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a b V Motherboard
June 6, 2010 4:25:59 PM

Quote:
Thank you,

I am upgrading my system to accomodate the XFX5770 graphic cardwhch requires PCIe2.0 slot, however my current mother board (DG965RYCK-intel) does not have this slot, i am using my processor core 2 duo 2.4 GHz which is LGA775.

Your motherboard does have a PCIe slot. Whether that is a 2.0 or 1.0, it will support the 5770 because PCIe2.0 is backward compatible to 1.0 as well.
If you are in doubt, buy the 5770 first and install it in your DG965RYCK motherboard. If it doesn't work, then buy the new motherboard. No harm since you intend to buy it in the first place and we just think that you don't have to...
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Anonymous
a b } Memory
a b V Motherboard
June 7, 2010 3:11:12 PM

randomkid said:
Your motherboard does have a PCIe slot. Whether that is a 2.0 or 1.0, it will support the 5770 because PCIe2.0 is backward compatible to 1.0 as well.
If you are in doubt, buy the 5770 first and install it in your DG965RYCK motherboard. If it doesn't work, then buy the new motherboard. No harm since you intend to buy it in the first place and we just think that you don't have to...



You are right, reason behind all these excercise is that

1 At present I am having Core 2 Duo (E6600 process) and 965 Mobo
2 I have read on the net that PCIe 2.0 card will run at half speed in used in PCIe 1.0 slot
3 I am able to resale my mobo and RAM at half of price
4 Therefore after spending some money i will have DP45SG mobo and corsair 1333 DDR3 4 GB ram instaed of 965 mobo and 800fsb 4GB ram

Though i have almost finalised but not sure, is it a wise decision are not as i am not a hardware expert.
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a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 81 } Memory
a c 236 V Motherboard
June 7, 2010 3:25:37 PM

Quote:
I have read on the net that PCIe 2.0 card will run at half speed in used in PCIe 1.0 slot
That's an incorrect statement. You won't see a measurable performance difference between the old and the new motherboard. You may have other reasons to replace your motherboard, but the new video card doesn't justify it.
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a b Ĉ ASUS
a b } Memory
a c 89 V Motherboard
June 7, 2010 3:30:20 PM

I completely agree with GhislainG. I don't know where you read that the card will run at half speed, but that's absolutely not true. PCI-E 2.0 is backwards compatible with PCI-E 1.0 and you won't notice a speed difference between the two with your 5770.
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May 6, 2012 12:00:38 AM

randomkid said:

3. Triple - applies when you have 3 sticks of RAM. Again preferably identical speed and latency. Used for 1366 motherboards.



Though this thread is old as the hills, I have to point out that this may be misleadiing unless the reader keeps in mind the Intel 1366 detail.

Putting three RAM modules into a dual-channel MB with 4 slots does not turn it into a 3-channel configuration.

Three-channel RAM now typically has 6 slots, one pair for each of three channels.

Dual channel RAM will have 4 slots, for two pair of matched RAM modules.

However the older 3-channel configurations did have four slots, three of the same color and the fourth a different color than the first three.

The reason for the pairs is so the system can see each 64-bit module as a single 128 bit module in dual-channel, or 192 bits in triple channel.
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