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NAS DEVICES

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October 27, 2011 11:21:21 PM

Hello, I am doing an assignment and I cant seem to find the answer anywhere online maybe I could get some help here. What is the speed of the network adapter available on a NAS device? What is the capacity range? Is there fault tolerance built into a NAS device. Are management features available?

More about : nas devices

October 29, 2011 6:40:08 PM

lmao NT1110 >.> doing the same assignment ill let you know if i find something
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October 30, 2011 4:18:01 PM

Same here. I'm not having much luck.
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October 30, 2011 10:28:46 PM

trey8330 said:
Hello, I am doing an assignment and I cant seem to find the answer anywhere online maybe I could get some help here. What is the speed of the network adapter available on a NAS device? What is the capacity range? Is there fault tolerance built into a NAS device. Are management features available?


NAS devices come in many varieties depending on if you build it yourself or purchase a vendor product. The speed is typically one gigabit Ethernet connection but this can be changed to multiple gigabit, 10 gigabit, fiber optic by adding a pci-e network card(s). Older parts can be used which may be limited to 10/100 megabit. If you need an exact answer for speed, simply look at the wiki on gigabit.

The capacity range again varies, people have built 40 TB (terabyte) machines and other just have 2TB. With port replication and addon hard drive controller cards there is hardly a limit on size. A board with 6 sata ports can be replicated (1 to 5 port) allowing for 30 drives to be attached, if 3TB drives were used in raid 50 that would be 72TB of storage.

As far as fault tolerance, raid 50 is fairly stable if set up correctly, raid 10 has been touted as one of the best setups since more drives can fail at one time without data loss. All of those features can be used on typical NAS devices.

Here is a typical management feature youtube rundown of FreeNAS 7, it covers the basic controls through a webpage.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5S8ixAR4Opo
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November 2, 2011 10:14:44 PM

NT1110 is the dumbest class ever
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November 2, 2011 10:48:45 PM

zippy2023 said:
NAS devices come in many varieties depending on if you build it yourself or purchase a vendor product. The speed is typically one gigabit Ethernet connection but this can be changed to multiple gigabit, 10 gigabit, fiber optic by adding a pci-e network card(s). Older parts can be used which may be limited to 10/100 megabit. If you need an exact answer for speed, simply look at the wiki on gigabit.

The capacity range again varies, people have built 40 TB (terabyte) machines and other just have 2TB. With port replication and addon hard drive controller cards there is hardly a limit on size. A board with 6 sata ports can be replicated (1 to 5 port) allowing for 30 drives to be attached, if 3TB drives were used in raid 50 that would be 72TB of storage.

As far as fault tolerance, raid 50 is fairly stable if set up correctly, raid 10 has been touted as one of the best setups since more drives can fail at one time without data loss. All of those features can be used on typical NAS devices.

Here is a typical management feature youtube rundown of FreeNAS 7, it covers the basic controls through a webpage.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5S8ixAR4Opo


thanks allot this was exactly what I needed.
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November 3, 2011 6:14:01 PM

i AM ALSO TAKING NT1110 AND IT IS DRIVING ME CRAZY
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January 26, 2012 12:57:46 AM

ha now im in NT1110 this does suck!
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January 29, 2012 8:26:19 PM

ya i started taking NT 1110 about 2 months ago it was cool when we had a teacher who didnt really read any of it but now we got this j a c k a s s who said hes gonna read everything so it sucks now
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May 4, 2012 5:09:27 PM

jwright209 said:
ya i started taking NT 1110 about 2 months ago it was cool when we had a teacher who didnt really read any of it but now we got this j a c k a s s who said hes gonna read everything so it sucks now

Same exact thing happened in our class. Our teacher got a "real job" at some company, so we got a new teacher who is... well, pretty much like you said.
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May 4, 2012 9:02:47 PM

trey8330 said:
Hello, I am doing an assignment and I cant seem to find the answer anywhere online maybe I could get some help here. What is the speed of the network adapter available on a NAS device? What is the capacity range? Is there fault tolerance built into a NAS device. Are management features available?





URL http://www.webopedia.com/Term/N/network-attached_storag...
This web sight was very insightful on this question. I am in the same course right now
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May 7, 2012 4:42:16 AM

zippy2023 said:
NAS devices come in many varieties depending on if you build it yourself or purchase a vendor product. The speed is typically one gigabit Ethernet connection but this can be changed to multiple gigabit, 10 gigabit, fiber optic by adding a pci-e network card(s). Older parts can be used which may be limited to 10/100 megabit. If you need an exact answer for speed, simply look at the wiki on gigabit.

The capacity range again varies, people have built 40 TB (terabyte) machines and other just have 2TB. With port replication and addon hard drive controller cards there is hardly a limit on size. A board with 6 sata ports can be replicated (1 to 5 port) allowing for 30 drives to be attached, if 3TB drives were used in raid 50 that would be 72TB of storage.

As far as fault tolerance, raid 50 is fairly stable if set up correctly, raid 10 has been touted as one of the best setups since more drives can fail at one time without data loss. All of those features can be used on typical NAS devices.

Here is a typical management feature youtube rundown of FreeNAS 7, it covers the basic controls through a webpage.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5S8ixAR4Opo


hey can u help answer this question?

Speculate on why a user would want to use a NAS. For example, what would be the advantage of all family photos and videos being stored on a NAS in a family where the parents and children all had their own computers?
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May 8, 2012 10:06:46 PM




NAS is network allocated storage apart from any other systems attached to the network.

There are a lot of considerations:

1. Power usage. All users may shutdown their computers. (Some people build NAS from atom boards and other things for their low power characteristics.)

2. Always on availability. As long as the network is up and the NAS is functioning, it is always available regardless of what computers are on/off the network.

3. Centralized Storage for backup. If a computer needs to be rebuilt or wiped, you can push files and backups and restore from the same location.

4. Cost effective. Installing a RAID 1 in each computer (Mirror drive) would cost more and use more storage than perhaps a RAID 5 in the NAS with multiple PC's. This may apply more to offices than for example a small home with 2-3 PC's.

5. Redundancy. Most personal computers operate a single drive (cost consideration) or on performance considerations (RAID 0 etc.) more so than reliability. NAS are typically setup for redundancy in case of drive failure (RAID 1,5,6 and the various permutations.)

6. Lower priority data. This doesn't always apply, but lower priority data can be moved to another location (for example, VM Images). They take up storage space, but a user may not want this to take up higher priority space.
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May 8, 2012 10:24:24 PM

ok thanks thats perfect
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November 2, 2012 4:47:07 AM

NT1110 consists of just a fricken lecture and then. "Here's the work, now go do it." I mean ***! We're supposed to be learning what makes a computer tick by taking the damn things apart and putting names to the parts!!! That's what HANDS ON LEARNING, is supposed to be about. I can't just stick my nose into a text book for a whole day and suddenly learn something by the end of it. I'll come out of that with a head ache and I'll have forgotten half of what I read.
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November 2, 2012 8:47:52 PM

Suck it up, grow a set and find some f*ckin work ethic. I sure as hell hope you're not going in to IT, cause I don't want to be stuck pulling your dead weight with you on my team.

Lesson #1 from the real world: Work involves doing the fun stuff and the boring *** that goes with it, so get used to doing the 2nd part and don't screw up doing the first part cause you didn't bother with the 2nd.

[/endrant]
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December 4, 2012 4:04:46 PM

MetalMoose13 said:
NT1110 consists of just a fricken lecture and then. "Here's the work, now go do it." I mean ***! We're supposed to be learning what makes a computer tick by taking the damn things apart and putting names to the parts!!! That's what HANDS ON LEARNING, is supposed to be about. I can't just stick my nose into a text book for a whole day and suddenly learn something by the end of it. I'll come out of that with a head ache and I'll have forgotten half of what I read.



This is wtf I said when I finally learned that we werent going to be doing any type of real hands-on type work. How am I just supposed to retain all this boring ass info then go out and use that when I dont understand that crap anyway!!!! UGH! But finally someone else said it instead of me.
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!