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I5-2500K or i5-3570K?

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May 7, 2012 12:48:50 PM

Hi all,

I'm looking towards building a new PC in a few weeks and had previously been set on an i5-2500K but with the release of Ivy bridge I'm torn between the old reliable i5-2500K or the new i5-3570K whose OC potential seems unclear to me at this point (Do they overheat?).

I was wondering what you guys would choose. This would be a gaming PC with OC on the CPU and based on Z77 platform.

Thanks for any input

P.

More about : 2500k 3570k

Anonymous
May 9, 2012 10:42:23 PM

I would go with the newer i5 just because it is newer. And for sure their OC potential will be proven more than the current i5. The Z77 platform mobos seem to be tougher and have more options in the BIOS to aid in overclocking. Enjoy it man, you wont regret any of the i5 CPUs. ;) 

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May 10, 2012 5:54:08 AM
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And for sure their OC potential will be proven more than the current i5.


Are you just assuming that? Because there's been numerous reports of Ivy-bridge overclocking problems, namely they heat up faster then Sandy-bridge did when you increase voltage, which limits high end overclocking to those with intense cooling solutions.

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/ivy-bridge-overclockin... (not like it was hard to find a source when the info is on this site)

That's not to say you might not do better, and personally I'd probably still buy the newer Ivy-bridge part, but you have to account for the heat with some decent cooling if you wanna overclock. Not like with Sandy-bridge where people strap a hyper 212 and clock it to 5ghz. If you go Ivy-bridge + z77 (or some z68 mobos) you get PCI-e 3.0 which means your slightly more future proof if say in like a few years you wanted to update GPU but still rock the same mobo/cpu config (and yes I know 'future-proofing' is a futile process most of the time).

If your main goal is to see as high a clock as possible (especially if your using air cooling) then go Sandy-bridge, but if you'd like the latest toys and prepared to deal with excess heat when you clock go Ivy-bridge.
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May 10, 2012 12:34:37 PM

go with ivy bridge. it offers more performance per clock than sand-bridge though you can get better clocks with SB. as long as you have good cooling, it wouldnt really matter until you reach very high clocks
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May 10, 2012 5:43:41 PM

im going to say the 2500k i haven't really heard any bad things about ivy but no good things either sandybridge i hear almost all good things, i actually cant think of one bad thing..maybe its 220$? but then again that's not bad at all
May 11, 2012 6:17:25 AM

robthatguyx said:
im going to say the 2500k i haven't really heard any bad things about ivy but no good things either sandybridge i hear almost all good things, i actually cant think of one bad thing..maybe its 220$? but then again that's not bad at all

What bad things did you hear about Ivy Bridge other than it beats Sandy Bridge in every bench Iv'e seen to date.
May 11, 2012 6:51:34 AM

Why_Me said:
What bad things did you hear about Ivy Bridge other than it beats Sandy Bridge in every bench Iv'e seen to date.


^+1 clock for clock it's better, and more efficient it's a new more advanced processor. The ONLY draw back (AFAIK) is the heat when tweaking voltages for overclocking, as long as you are aware of the heat thing there's no other reason what so ever to buy a year old part instead of its updated equivalent. It's performance gap isn't as major as when Sandy-bridge came out and kept up with 1366 extreme processors, but it is faster. The only reason I even went into depth about the heat issue is because the OP specifically mentioned overclocking. Of course some people would prefer to brag about 5ghz overclock then having twice as much bandwidth on their PCI-e lanes.
May 11, 2012 1:40:54 PM

Running an i5 2500K at 4.3 GHz no problems :) 

Just be sure to get a decent HSF. I'm running a Cooler Master Hyper 212+ and the highest its run is around on idle is about 30°C
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May 11, 2012 2:47:03 PM

Why_Me said:
What bad things did you hear about Ivy Bridge other than it beats Sandy Bridge in every bench Iv'e seen to date.


He said he has not heard bad or good things.
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May 13, 2012 4:57:03 PM

I've seen reviews get the 2570k to 4.6-4.8 ghz w/o all the heat issues of the new I7. I think it was Amandtech that said their new I5 overclocked 200mhz better than the 3770k they tested. But I could be wrong about the source. But more than likely you will get 4.5-4.6 as a good 24/7 OC on the 2570k. That's around a 4.8 ghz Sandy bridge:)  Plus you would get all the new goodies like PCIe 3.0 and native USB 3. Go for the IVY most definately!
Anonymous
May 13, 2012 7:56:18 PM

bigj1985 said:
I've seen reviews get the 2570k to 4.6-4.8 ghz w/o all the heat issues of the new I7. I think it was Amandtech that said their new I5 overclocked 200mhz better than the 3770k they tested. But I could be wrong about the source. But more than likely you will get 4.5-4.6 as a good 24/7 OC on the 2570k. That's around a 4.8 ghz Sandy bridge:)  Plus you would get all the new goodies like PCIe 3.0 and native USB 3. Go for the IVY most definately!


+1
May 13, 2012 8:58:52 PM

I overclocked my i5-3570k to 4.5ghz 5ghz turbo with temps running idle at 35 degrees celcius and under load at 40-50 degrees celcius. No problems whatsoever! :D 

Bus speed: 105mhz
Multiplier: x42
Voltage: 1.1v
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May 13, 2012 9:01:45 PM

what did you use to cool it ?
May 13, 2012 9:04:52 PM

robthatguyx said:
what did you use to cool it ?


Enermax ETS-T40-TA and Arctic Silver 5 thermal paste
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May 13, 2012 9:28:31 PM

not bad
May 25, 2012 3:40:00 PM

Best answer selected by Pete_the_Puma.
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