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4.7 out of a 3770k?

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May 7, 2012 5:41:25 PM

Hey All,
I am finishing up a build this week and I was wondering what you all have gotten out of the 3770k on high end air? I have the phanteks ph-tc14pe with the extra fan in a HAF 922 and I wanted to have a ball park of what I can expect out of my cpu.

Thanks,
Dan

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May 7, 2012 5:49:18 PM

On air... 4.2 would probably be safer since Ivy gets hot although intel did make a announcement saying "dont worry about temps, when overclocking the temps may noticeably get hotter, but intel engineers have tested and met the qualifications"
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May 7, 2012 5:51:35 PM

hehe my 2550k goes to 5.2
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May 7, 2012 6:20:45 PM

Rockdpm said:
On air... 4.2 would probably be safer since Ivy gets hot although intel did make a announcement saying "dont worry about temps, when overclocking the temps may noticeably get hotter, but intel engineers have tested and met the qualifications"


That is surprising. I would think that I should be able to easily get past 4.2 with decent temps with my cooler. The tc14pe is at least equal to (if not better then) the noctua d14.

Anyone else have any first hand results?
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May 7, 2012 7:25:35 PM

I remember it was either Tom's or Anand, but they got it to 4.4GHz on air and stopped it there. I'd bet something similar for most other chips using higher-end air cooling.
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May 7, 2012 7:32:43 PM

trial and error buddy, if you are not increasing voltage, then temps shouldn't change from stock, the only way they go up is if there is more wattage going through the chip.

Voltage equals heat. Every chip is different. Some are better than others.
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May 7, 2012 7:38:39 PM

eddieroolz said:
I remember it was either Tom's or Anand, but they got it to 4.4GHz on air and stopped it there. I'd bet something similar for most other chips using higher-end air cooling.

That's encouraging. I guess we will have to see what I can pull out of it. I might make a post later this week about it if anyone is interested.
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May 7, 2012 8:11:18 PM

I just built an ivy bridge system this weekend and got the 3570k to 4.5 ghz at 1.2v, temps are in the low 70's using prime. I still haven't really tuned it either, I can probably get it faster or get the volts lower at 4.5ghz.
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May 7, 2012 8:21:37 PM

alvine said:
hehe my 2550k goes to 5.2

lol if you want to play that way, considering that the 3770k is 16% better clock for clock, i would only need to get to a 4.3 to beat your 5.2

CoolBOBob1 said:
I just built an ivy bridge system this weekend and got the 3570k to 4.5 ghz at 1.2v, temps are in the low 70's using prime. I still haven't really tuned it either, I can probably get it faster or get the volts lower at 4.5ghz.

Cool, what cooler do you have? I would love to get 4.6 out of it, and by the looks of it i can. Anand and toms are saying that 1.3v is the very highest safe voltage,
edit: (never finished my sentence) so I think that a 4.6 is more than reasonable maybe even at 1.25v
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May 7, 2012 8:27:46 PM

ismaeljrp said:
trial and error buddy, if you are not increasing voltage, then temps shouldn't change from stock, the only way they go up is if there is more wattage going through the chip.

This is not true. You'll get temperature increases from higher frequencies as well, though voltage increases are far and away the largest culprit. Check out the chart about halfway down this article.

From what I've read, you can expect to get around 4.5 - 4.6 out of IVB on high end air. Even at these levels you're going to be running the chip REALLY hot. These things are air cooling nightmares, which is why I picked up the 2500k a week before the IVB launch.
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May 7, 2012 8:33:48 PM

boodahz said:
lol if you want to play that way, considering that the 3770k is 16% better clock for clock, i would only need to get to a 4.3 to beat your 5.2

Not quite the correct conclusion to make. The 3770k is about 4-5% faster clock for clock, it just also has hyperthreading which helps immensely in some tasks. You'd see a similar gap between the 2500k and 2700k.
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May 7, 2012 8:45:45 PM

ismaeljrp said:
trial and error buddy, if you are not increasing voltage, then temps shouldn't change from stock, the only way they go up is if there is more wattage going through the chip.

Voltage equals heat. Every chip is different. Some are better than others.

Sorry, I didnt even see your post for some reason. But while more voltage means more heat, like willard said there is more to it then that.

willard said:
Not quite the correct conclusion to make. The 3770k is about 4-5% faster clock for clock, it just also has hyperthreading which helps immensely in some tasks. You'd see a similar gap between the 2500k and 2700k.


You must not have seen the comparison in my link? I know that the difference is not definite but there was an at least 4% boost on everything (but CS5 which is not threaded at all) and on the things you would do with an i7 over an i5, there were massive boosts in performance. Anyway, i was kidding with him, that is an excellent cpu, and if I was only gaming i would get that over the 3750k and get haswell next year tbh.
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May 7, 2012 8:53:51 PM

boodahz said:
You must not have seen the comparison in my link?

I did see the comparisons. They were comparing the 3770k to the 2550k. The 3770k has hyperthreading, the 2550k does not, thus the extremely large increases in some apps (the ones that can make use of hyperthreading).

The chart at the top of the page is the one you want, which compares the 3770k against the 2700k, which also has hyperthreading. This chart shows a 3.7% average performance increase.

From the bottom of the page you linked (emphasis added):

Quote:
Premiere Pro render jobs and Visual Studio projects are some of the most taxing in our suite—both get big boosts from the additional L3 cache and Hyper-Threading support offered by the highest-end mainstream CPUs.
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May 7, 2012 8:59:26 PM

willard said:
I did see the comparisons. They were comparing the 3770k to the 2550k. The 3770k has hyperthreading, the 2550k does not, thus the extremely large increases in some apps (the ones that can make use of hyperthreading).

The chart at the top of the page is the one you want, which compares the 3770k against the 2700k, which also has hyperthreading. This chart shows a 3.7% average performance increase.

From the bottom of the page you linked (emphasis added):

Quote:
Premiere Pro render jobs and Visual Studio projects are some of the most taxing in our suite—both get big boosts from the additional L3 cache and Hyper-Threading support offered by the highest-end mainstream CPUs.

I see what you are saying then, but the point still remains that under circumstances, the 3770k is 16% better then the 2550k, but that is off topic anyway
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May 7, 2012 9:06:20 PM

Yes, comparing those two specific processors, the 3770k is on average about 16% faster. I seem to remember early overclocking benchmarks showing that the 3770k, once overclocked, is about 5%-8% faster than the 2700k. Since Tom's testing only showed a 3.7% increase, I think you'll probably widen the gap just a tiny bit more compared to the 2550k once you overclock.

I believe if you can hit 4.5 - 4.6, you're at least as fast, or faster than Sandy Bridge depending on the workload. With water, the gap widens even more because you can manage IVB's heat problem more effectively.
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May 9, 2012 8:14:51 PM

Best answer selected by boodahz.
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