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Thermal Paste on Hyper 212 Evo?

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May 10, 2012 2:44:15 AM

Hello!

I'm going to be building a moderate gaming build in a Fractal R3. Relevant parts are:

CPU: i5-2500k
Mobo: Extreme3 Gen3
CPU fan: Hyper 212 Evo
Case: Fractal Design R3

So my overclock isn't going to be anything spectacular (as you can tell). I'm really going for a quiet overclocked gaming build. I know that the Hyper 212 Evo already comes with thermal paste... do I need to get higher-quality thermal paste? How much will it impact CPU temperatures?

Also, do you have any tips? I'm completely new to actually assembling computers (although I've been a hardware geek for two months, now :lol:  ). I've heard that sticking your finger inside a plastic bag and spreading the paste evenly and thinly is the way to go... any other suggestions?

Thanks!
a b 4 Gaming
a c 117 à CPUs
a c 88 K Overclocking
May 10, 2012 5:00:59 AM

For your first applications, use the included thermal compound, it is reported that it is almost as good (within 1C or 2C of Arctic Silver 5 - a popular compound). I have had no success using the plastic bag method but the proper application of thermal compound is almost an art form. Use whatever technique you feel most comfortable with, and (most important) take your time.
Two tips... watch as many build vids as you can stand (some are near worthless) and read stickys on building (here and at other sites).
Also, once you begin your build, don't be afraid to ask questions, better to ask first if unsure than to suffer through mistakes that could easily been avoided
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Best solution

a b 4 Gaming
a c 185 à CPUs
a c 150 K Overclocking
May 10, 2012 5:03:19 AM

The stock Thermal Compound included with the Hyper 212 EVO performs suprisingly well. First of all, the weight of the cooler to spread the compound. The Hyper 212 EVO will spread the paste around evenly, make sure to put a SMALL PEA of thermal paste in the middle!!
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May 10, 2012 6:11:05 AM

When I installed this cooler, I followed the instructions for a sort of "lines" method that involves putting thin lines of compound along the heat pipes of the heat sink, and then you put a small dab of compound on the center of the CPU. It seemed to work pretty well, just as long as you don't squeeze too much out.
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a b 4 Gaming
a c 83 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
May 10, 2012 6:16:32 AM

Except he has the evo, so it should have a flat base. You needed to fill in the lines with the older 212+. Unless its still not flat...

Just use the stock stuff. You said you weren't going for a hard core OC so the stock 212 paste will be fine.
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a b 4 Gaming
a c 185 à CPUs
a c 150 K Overclocking
May 10, 2012 6:22:40 AM

EVO is flat! :) 
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May 10, 2012 12:15:22 PM

I think we've established that the base of the EVO is flat. Does that change application methods (I guess I won't be doing lines)?

Your link in your sig, amuffin, was really helpful, as well.
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a b 4 Gaming
a c 83 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
May 10, 2012 2:50:36 PM

There are two basic ways to apply paste. One is to put an amount the size of a small pea or large grain of rice in the middle and put the heatsink on it. Twist the heatsink 90 degrees both ways a few times and then secure it. This is supposed to spread the TIM out. (a basic twist on this method is to use two small lines so that you make sure you reach the ends of the chip.) I'm old school however so I prefer the second method.

Put a small amount in the center of the chip and use "something" to spread it all around. Finger in ziplock bag is one idea, old credit card or part of a 3x5 index card is another. Keep spreading it until you have the entire surface of the chip with a THIN film of TIM. Once that is done put the heatsink on with as little movement as possible as you don't want it pushing the TIM off the chip. This method has served me well for nearly 20 years and I don't see why I should stop.

And as correctly pointed out when dealing with a chip like the 212+ you need to fill in any deep crevasses with TIM before mounting.
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May 10, 2012 3:10:18 PM

Just built a i5-2500k with the CM 212 Evo. My first build. Worried myself sick. Senselessly. Knock wood, great experience. Could not be happier.

Couple comments:

first, newegg has a 3 part youtube series on building - - very detailed, probably too basic, but a good intro.

second, no problem with CM's thermal paste. I experimented with the "plastic bag" method shown in the egg's videos. Monitoring with COUID's Hardware Monitor, my cores idle at 29 to34 C. haven't seen much over 60 C yet - but have yet to push or or overclock. stressed successfully with Prime 95 - again, perfecto.

keep it simple, take your time, relax & enjoy.

worked for me.

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May 10, 2012 3:18:10 PM

errata (typo, sorry) - the referenced Hardware Monitor program is by CPUID.

the AS Suite II utility, included with my mobo, is notoriously inaccurate - showing temps 10 to 12 C lower than what shows in Bios (UEFI). mobo = asus p8z68v pro/gen3, which (again, knock wood) has been working nicely.
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May 10, 2012 6:17:24 PM

I'm kind of worried about putting a dot and having the heatsink spread it around... I mean, will it get everywhere? I'm afraid it would have a thicker coat in the center and really thin at the edges (and possibly none at the corners). Would spreading it with a card as 474 said be fine?
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May 17, 2012 12:13:52 PM

Last question. If I apply a dot of thermal paste, put the heat sink on it, and move it around as you said... can I pick it back up and check that everything is covered? I realize that this is probably a dumb question, and I'm assuming yes, but better safe than sorry!
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a c 95 à CPUs
a c 224 K Overclocking
May 17, 2012 12:16:11 PM

4745454b said:
I'm old school however so I prefer the second method.

Put a small amount in the center of the chip and use "something" to spread it all around. Finger in ziplock bag is one idea, old credit card or part of a 3x5 index card is another. Keep spreading it until you have the entire surface of the chip with a THIN film of TIM. Once that is done put the heatsink on with as little movement as possible as you don't want it pushing the TIM off the chip. This method has served me well for nearly 20 years and I don't see why I should stop.


First off I'm not discounting what 4745454b is saying, I'm going to add some of what I have learned past what I thought I previously knew, I learned a lot doing the Thermal Compound Roundup in my sig below, the multiple applications of the heat sinks, both air and water, applying TIM (Thermal Interface Material), seating, pulling and inspecting the footprint.

Using every application method in the book I went back to my old school applying, except you do want it pushing the TIM off the chip, the TIMs purpose is to conduct the heat and is used as a replacement for air, a poor conductor of heat but an excellent insulator.

The TIMs purpose is only to fill the microscopic imperfections between the two contacting surfaces, anyone under the misconception a full layer is needed is using way too much TIM in the first place, if you've used enough to squish out to the edge, you've simply used too much.

I always apply extra discretionary downward pressure (meaning not to the point of socket damage), on the heat sink by hand as I'm tightening it down to make sure the contacting layer is as thin as possible.

ddan49 said:
I'm kind of worried about putting a dot and having the heatsink spread it around... I mean, will it get everywhere? I'm afraid it would have a thicker coat in the center and really thin at the edges (and possibly none at the corners). Would spreading it with a card as 474 said be fine?


Nothing overrides seating and then pulling the heat sink to inspect the footprint, then you know, and don't have to guess or assume.

Rougher finished heat sink bases require more TIM to fill the microscopic imperfections, and even though you may have a perfectly flat heat sink base with a smooth mirror finish, does not mean your CPUs heat spreader is not convex or concave faced, that is even more of a reason to pull and inspect the contact footprint.
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May 17, 2012 11:31:17 PM

So what you're saying is that putting a dot and having the heat sink spread it around is the best option (in your opinion), and that it doesn't necessarily have to go all the way to the edge?
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a c 95 à CPUs
a c 224 K Overclocking
May 18, 2012 12:22:43 AM

I make sure it goes all the way to the edge.

The heat spreaders purpose is to do exactly what it's called, spreads the heat from the CPU outward, and I take full advantage of that, if you use the right amount of TIM you'll have just enough to press out all the way to the edge of the heat spreader.

You don't want to use so much it squishes out all around the edge, that's a total waste of TIM.

Quote:
Nothing overrides seating and then pulling the heat sink to inspect the footprint, then you know, and don't have to guess or assume.
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May 18, 2012 12:58:10 AM

Ah, okay! Thanks! I think this is closed, now. Since the original answer to my question was one of the first posts, I'll pick one of those. However, thanks to all of you for your help!
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May 18, 2012 12:58:36 AM

Best answer selected by ddan49.
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a b 4 Gaming
a c 83 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
May 18, 2012 1:09:03 AM

That works if your heatsink has a flat base. The 212+ does not. You need to fill in those cracks with TIM before you do that.
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May 18, 2012 12:15:21 PM

Yeah, but I'm getting the Evo ;) 
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May 30, 2012 1:33:47 AM

Arctic Silver 5 is a good thermal paste compound.
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May 30, 2012 1:43:24 AM

But unnecessary, as we have figured out. AS5 is the best compound imo though.
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a b 4 Gaming
a c 83 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
May 30, 2012 7:08:57 AM

IC diamond would disagree.
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a b 4 Gaming
a c 185 à CPUs
a c 150 K Overclocking
May 30, 2012 7:20:02 AM

AS5 is good, but it's an older compound! Many newer ones outperform it.
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