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OC'ing my GPU for the first time.

Last response: in Overclocking
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May 12, 2012 6:39:15 AM

My graphics card is this GTS 250: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I have EVGA precision downloaded I was using tweak utility the default but it wouldn't let me adjust the voltage. Since i've never done this I didn't want to OC anything too high and brick my card. If you need any more info let me know

My full build is
Haf 912
i5-2500
Cooler master hyper 212+
Asrock pro3 gen3
8GB Kingston ddr3-1333
Corsair tx650 v2

If you're thinking why the hell does he have those specs and an old GTS 250. It's because i'm waiting for the GTX 660. Built this fresh on 5/4/12

More about : ing gpu time

May 12, 2012 6:40:21 PM

Please need some insight on how to do this correctly. I don't want to boost all the clocks too high and not have a stable voltage. I understand the clock scaling but i'm still very ignorant about voltages to make sure the card is staying stable. Please please please help me out! xD.

Another thing I noted after I DL'ed EVGA precision X. When I first opened the program and checked the clocks, and voltage, the clocks were at their stock speeds, where as the EVGA precision X had the voltage defaulted to maximum.
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a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
May 14, 2012 8:26:35 PM

Rule of thumb is start with your shader and frequency clock; then memory; then voltage. Based upon your card you may not be able to truly overclock it that much for two reasons.

It doesn't have a dedicated power; it's drawing power from the motherboard. Which may create some instability.

Was looking at wrong Newegg page; it does have dedicated power.

The next is; since it is a cheaper card to begin with it will have less wiggle room for heat and may have high temperature with very little gains.

So in essence; the power gain from overclocking may not be worth it based upon the power. Power per watt ratio.

As a base point; I'd try 750 mhz, 2100 mhz memory, and adjust shader clock to 1865. That is a very, very low Overclock. But as I said; if it will handle it... Not sure.
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May 21, 2012 5:19:12 PM

Best answer selected by Tbrown37.
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May 21, 2012 5:19:56 PM

Yeah I start artifacting at about 770 core clock but have it stable at 750 and 1100 mem. Getting myself a 560 TI in the mean time until the 660 is released.
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a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
May 21, 2012 9:25:15 PM

Tbrown37 said:
Yeah I start artifacting at about 770 core clock but have it stable at 750 and 1100 mem. Getting myself a 560 TI in the mean time until the 660 is released.


A fine, fine card. But if I may ask what are you using your graphics card for? By the way, the GTX 670 is on Newegg for $399 :http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...

If you don't need the performance or do gaming; you could save yourself some money. Doing a dual SLI of 560 Ti or 570. That would be more then enough. The Gtx 580 may be 50% slower then a Gtx 670- but unless you truly are looking for the crazy "eye-candy" the 580 will easily run all current applications with no less then 40 fps maxed out ( 2500 x 1920).

As stated... Even the 570 and 580 are barely pushed to the limits; they are older cards. Only a handful of games truly utilize the cards entire potential.

The Gtx 570; will be an even higher bang for the buck. Which you could use SLI for- two of those would easily meet your desired performance. If you are gaming- then get the 670; if your playing Star Wars, Diablo III, or a game that may not require more GPU but rather more CPU. Then you could do a 570 or 580 and save $100-$250 dollars.

I'll be able to point you in a better direction once I know use; but the 670 is overkill for most systems. As in the wonderful world of technology will be out-dated by either end of this year or next year with another gpu release.
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