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2500k vcore voltage

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May 20, 2012 12:55:38 AM

I have my CPU OC'd to 4.0 ghz and I was wondering what a good vcore voltage setting for this would be.

More about : 2500k vcore voltage

a c 185 à CPUs
a c 150 K Overclocking
May 20, 2012 1:07:29 AM

Should be a slight voltage bump above stock voltage. REMEMBER every processor is different, so your 2500k may be able to run 4ghz at a low voltage, but your friends might have to run 4ghz at a higher voltage!
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May 20, 2012 1:41:14 AM

amuffin said:
Should be a slight voltage bump above stock voltage. REMEMBER every processor is different, so your 2500k may be able to run 4ghz at a low voltage, but your friends might have to run 4ghz at a higher voltage!


Thank you for the help!
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May 20, 2012 8:46:53 AM

Well, i have the same cpu oc to 4 ghz i just chenged my multiplier nothing else and my vcore is 1.32V hope i helped
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May 21, 2012 1:21:13 PM

Yeah mine too. I have it OCed to 4Ghz using mutiplier with only TurboBoost disabled. Everything else is unchanged, including default Vcore @1.335v. I could lower the Vcore to 1.260v or use Dynamic Vcore -0.075v and still stable in P95/IBT but I don't see much different in temps (idle 29 C, max 65 C) so I just left it on default.
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May 21, 2012 1:43:04 PM

I forgot to add that every CPU has its own sweet spot and you'll have to find it. You can disable Intel TB and enter 40x in the multiplier with everything else untouched. Then stress test with Prime95 for 20 minutes or so. If it's stable and temp is cool, you can leave it at that. You can also lower the Vcore by 0.01v and test again. Rinse and repeat until it crashes, then raise Vcore up a notch. That'll be the voltage (barely enough) needed for your OC to be stable.

Bad case scenario is that your CPU crash @4Ghz on default voltage, then you need to raise it up bit by bit until stable. Watch your temp. You can download HWmonitor to monitor your temp. Remember the PSU and motherboard (especially) also play important roles for a good OCing.
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May 21, 2012 3:56:29 PM

u should be able to hit 4ghz with only 1.2 or even 1.19 v core as ive got 4.2ghz with only 1.248 vcore and very stable so i would start at about 1.24 and work down in small amounts till u get unstable and stress test , hope this helps ya out-jb
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
May 22, 2012 4:45:18 AM

Should be able to do it below stock voltage no problem. My 2600K can do 4.4 at stock, but every chip is a bit different
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a c 185 à CPUs
a c 150 K Overclocking
May 22, 2012 5:09:36 AM

Crazy 4.4 stable at stock? You are really lucky.
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a c 95 à CPUs
a c 224 K Overclocking
May 22, 2012 3:47:26 PM

Foxrage2 said:
I have my CPU OC'd to 4.0 ghz and I was wondering what a good vcore voltage setting for this would be.


You should be able to run 4.0ghz in the 1.20v range some of these suggestions at 1.32 are very high for 4.0ghz I run 4.5ghz at 1.325v Fixed Voltage, I'm not saying all 2500Ks run the same but they are very similar and the way you use your voltage settings, meaning fixed or offset, and additionally load line calibration settings affect what you can do regarding certain multiplier levels.

I would suggest reading and studying some type of overclocking guide for your own knowledge, because 4.0ghz can be done with a 2500K, (literally with it's hands tied behind it's back, if it had hands.) :) 

Some of the advice you are getting is coming from 2600K owners and their voltage ranges are different from the 2500K, their voltage ranges will not be the same as your 2500K, I suggest you take your advice from fellow 2500K owners, but that's not meant as an insult to those attempting to help you. Ryan
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