Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Extending the Heat pipes

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
May 23, 2012 8:28:47 AM

Hi all,


I recently purchased a XFX OC'ed 2GB graphics card. I am running some bit coin mining operations which are GPU intensive and Temperatures are increasing. At present i am trying to maintain my Graphics card temperatures just below 80 degree centigrade. Is that OK or should i bring them further down. My heatsink side of the graphics is enclosed with dual fan case so i can do less to increase the air flow that side; My fans are already running at 100%. I have opened up the case to give max cooling possible. Also i have purchased a Coolmaster 120mmx120mm fan with 45CFM airflow fan and blowing air as close as possible to the back side of the GFX card which brought temperatures under 80 degree centigrade. Now that i want to reduce the temperatures i am thinking of this below idea.

My GFX card have Cu pipes running to make it cooler. Can i extend the CU pipe by attaching some copper plates as fins with a good thermal compound. Will that be of any help. Has any one tried that ever. Need suggestions

Also can you guys suggest to economically reduce the temperature.
Also i am using MSI after burner, and my GFX card is XFX 6950, i am running an appilcation which is processor intensive but doesnt need much memory bandwidth, with MSI afterburner i can reduce the speed only upto 650MHZ, is there a tool which will help me to go lesser than this.

Thanks

More about : extending heat pipes

a b U Graphics card
a c 330 K Overclocking
May 23, 2012 9:33:36 PM

Quote:
My GFX card have Cu pipes running to make it cooler. Can i extend the CU pipe by attaching some copper plates as fins with a good thermal compound. Will that be of any help. Has any one tried that ever. Need suggestions


You simply cannot do this. Heatpipes are a sealed tube and by opening them in any way is going to cause them to become inoperable unless you understand how to actually create them in the first place.

(Edit: I re-read this a little more closely...you aren't suggesting to open them, but merely add surface area. This likely isn't going to result in much of an improvement, if any.)

I'd recommend pulling the stock cooler and replacing thermal paste and reapplying the stock cooler. You might see a decent drop just from this. Otherwise, I'm thinking it's case airflow...try blowing a fan into your open case to see if it might in fact be airflow.
m
0
l
May 24, 2012 10:07:33 AM

Which thermal paste should i Buy can you please recommend?

m
0
l
Related resources
a b K Overclocking
June 7, 2012 8:08:59 PM

You can't add on to heat pipes.
You might actually be destroying the cooling efficiency of the case, by taking off the side panel.
They are designed to be run with the side panel in place. However, if you take a floor fan and put it blowing directly into the case, that'll improve things.
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
a c 330 K Overclocking
June 7, 2012 8:45:47 PM

It will also specify if he has poor case airflow by the before/after temp comparison as well. A case with good airflow shouldn't be impacted much by removing the side and blowing the fan in. (in fact, this is the same tactic I suggest for people thinking they simply need to upgrade their CPU cooler when they really need to address their poor case airflow.

A case with poor airflow will still hinder a good cooler.
m
0
l
June 12, 2012 10:40:05 AM

Agreed, you should take off the heatsink itself and re-apply the thermal compound, though the difference probably won't be huge, it'll be noticeable.

Btw rubix, did you get my PM?
m
0
l
July 16, 2012 4:34:30 PM

isnt 80c normal for a GPU under load?
m
0
l
!