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What to do with my e8400?

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February 15, 2010 9:00:51 PM

Hi guys, I'm in a pretty annoying situation here. As many of you know dual cores aren't the norm here any more. With media encoding getting quite a boost with extra cores and even upcoming games dual cores have had their time. I feel that my PC has got enough juice for the years to come considering I enjoy gaming, media editing, and soon going to do engineering at uni.

Here's my rig:
CPU : Intel e8400 @ 3.6GHz
Mobo : Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3p
HSF : HDT-S1283 w/ bracket
RAM : 2x2gb G.Skill Pi series
GPU : 4870 Vapor-X
PSU : OCZ 600w StealthXStream

The thing is, I don't know If I should keep my CPU and wait until the future of AM3, 1336 and 1156 is clearer - or - bite the bullet and go for a quad core. If the later is a better choice, which platform do I choose, tbh I don't like the sound of 1336 as it's pretty expensive for me, 1156 looks good but so does AM3 - although I don't know how long these sockets will last. I don't want to wait too long as I want to sell my CPU and mobo before they have nearly no value.
Can someone shed some light and help me decide what to do?

Thx, Mojito

More about : e8400

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February 15, 2010 10:20:15 PM

I am in a similar situation.

Currently, my E8500 does everything I ask it to. I built the rig about a year and half to 2 years ago and it is still chugging hard at everything I throw at it. For me, it is perfect. I am currently waiting till 32nm becomes the top dog and then I will make the switch. If your system is not meeting your highest expectations then I recommend a switch - seeing as how it is such a subjective situation. I would recommend a high overclock and if that does not help, switch. For me, the only part lagging on my system is my regular spin disk harddrives. If I were to put in an SSD and get 4 gigs of 1066 I could hit my 4.5 gigahert overclock again and be satisfied well through windows 7.
February 16, 2010 10:04:46 AM

Hi werxen, OC'ing will probably help but I'm a bit scared of going over 3.6GHz as it will reduce the life of the proccy, also I'm no veteran in the overclocking world. If switching is the best thing to do, I have no idea where to go since I want to stay on one socket and change mobo for every 2-3 CPUs. Intel has a confusing strategy with 2 sockets and I don't know if one of them is a trap (ex:in a years time they say that 1156 is at EOL and all users have to switch to 1336), AMD has AM3 but how long until that gets replaced?
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February 16, 2010 2:16:20 PM

lol going over 3.6 will not reduce the life of your processor. The only thing that can do that is if you massively overvolt like 1.45 + volts. I ran my chip at 1.5 to benchmark for a whole month - still alive :p  Wolfdales are not known for their dieing.
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February 16, 2010 2:53:36 PM

Every time you overclock you reduce the life of the chip. With that being said the life of a chip is rather long and most people do not keep their chip for the whole life span. In other words unless you do an extreme overclock you will not see the effects of it.

When it comes to sockets it seems like intel goes through sockets a little quicker then amd. AM3 was released a little less than a year ago so I can see a hand full of new chips for it. My money is one AM3 being around for another year and then switching to something else, this is not a fact this is just me looking at their track record and trying to extrapolate. As far as intel’s sockets are concerned I really can’t say, it seems like they throw a dart to choose the number of cpus they will put on a socket.
February 16, 2010 4:32:06 PM

@ werxen, overclocking looks more interesting now. But I have 800Mhz RAM, will that effect my overclocking. Do you think I could get up to 4GHz?

@ Pro Llama, interesting deduction. I was thinking that AM3 will change socket when they get Bulldozer out. Going quad looks more enticing now.

Unfortunatly, geting a mobo+cpu+ram= at least 400€. Yea it sucks to be in France.
That's around 570$ for an I5 750(174€/240$) and a GA-P55A-UD3R(137€/188$) and 4GB DDR3(110€/150$)
I used xe.com for conversions.
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February 16, 2010 5:09:23 PM

mojito_619 said:
@ werxen, overclocking looks more interesting now. But I have 800Mhz RAM, will that effect my overclocking. Do you think I could get up to 4GHz?

@ Pro Llama, interesting deduction. I was thinking that AM3 will change socket when they get Bulldozer out. Going quad looks more enticing now.

Unfortunatly, geting a mobo+cpu+ram= at least 400€. Yea it sucks to be in France.
That's around 570$ for an I5 750(174€/240$) and a GA-P55A-UD3R(137€/188$) and 4GB DDR3(110€/150$)
I used xe.com for conversions.


As long as you have good cooling and monitor all of your temps, you should be able to get a good overclock. There is no way to tell if your specific chip will hit 4ghz because each chip will hit its wall at a different speed, though there is normally an average that they will stop around. It is likely that you will be able to hit 4ghz, but you have to play around until you are happy with it. Do you have prime95? It is great at stress testing your overclock.

@your prices: wow……… I could do an i7 920 setup at that price.
February 16, 2010 5:58:41 PM

I suggest you keep your current rig, OC more if you think it is worth it and raise some money to be able to afford a new rig next year. This one you can keep for storage/media play on a HD TV or just as a back up in case the new one "detonates":) .

Until the new year the new sockets will stabilize and you will se who give you the best advantage, Intel or AMD.

Or just sell the hole thing not necessarily now, when you get some more money also, and buy a new PC from the raised funds and the money from your PC. Go i7 or am3.

Am3 will give you more then 1156 (i5) now, especially if you buy a "black" CPU witch you can overclock higher.

February 16, 2010 7:39:44 PM

Ok guys, thanks for all the help clearing the fog on my situation. I'm just going to OC my e8400 and wait it out, and see what happens at the end of the year.
Thanks once again, Mojito
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February 16, 2010 9:46:44 PM

Pro Llama said:
Every time you overclock you reduce the life of the chip. With that being said the life of a chip is rather long and most people do not keep their chip for the whole life span. In other words unless you do an extreme overclock you will not see the effects of it.

When it comes to sockets it seems like intel goes through sockets a little quicker then amd. AM3 was released a little less than a year ago so I can see a hand full of new chips for it. My money is one AM3 being around for another year and then switching to something else, this is not a fact this is just me looking at their track record and trying to extrapolate. As far as intel’s sockets are concerned I really can’t say, it seems like they throw a dart to choose the number of cpus they will put on a socket.



Do you have any evidence to support your claims? By your logic if you underclock a chip it should last longer yet all the evidence points to the contrary. There is absolutely zero evidence that overclocking will reduce the life of your chip in the long run if you are a good overclocker. The only thing, like I said, that can kill your CPU is if you overvolt. Electron migration theory stands the same on either end of the spectrum. Again, overclocking is purely theory but what we do know is overvolting CAN kill your processor immediately. I see where you are coming from with your theory but its a rather 'safe' assumption to make because you always have the net of CPU life to fall back on. What is the average life of a cpu? You don't know and neither does anyone else so let us assume for now that smart+safe overclocking does NOT kill your cpu any faster.
February 16, 2010 10:31:02 PM

Actually intel said that it might reduce the life cycle of the CPu because of stressing and the k..whatever, (forgot the name) material witch the 45nm CPU's use, lasts less then the older 65nm. Also because of the high speed certain atoms/particles from inside the CPU might migrate and making the CPu to last less. But i think it will last for 3-6 years depending on the overclock, system components and heat dissipation in time, voltage stability..etc. (

If you don't stress it too much it might last longer but i think by that time we will forget about it.

Just don't go with the voltage over the recommended limit for your CPU and it should be fine. Check Intel's website for details on voltage limit.
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February 16, 2010 10:44:59 PM

ionut19 said:
Actually intel said that it might reduce the life cycle of the CPu because of stressing and the k..whatever, (forgot the name) material witch the 45nm CPU's use, lasts less then the older 65nm. Also because of the high speed certain atoms/particles from inside the CPU might migrate and making the CPu to last less. But i think it will last for 3-6 years depending on the overclock, system components and heat dissipation in time, voltage stability..etc. (

If you don't stress it too much it might last longer but i think by that time we will forget about it.

Just don't go with the voltage over the recommended limit for your CPU and it should be fine. Check Intel's website for details on voltage limit.



Horse manure. You back up nothing with 'mights' and 'forgots' and differences between 45 and 65 nm and things that I have already hit on. Irrelevant post with nothing factual yet again. My claim stands strong unless someone can prove otherwise. Overclock away my friend. Your CPU will last as long as you can keep all the other components alive. Do not listen to the rubbish posted by bad overclockers on this forum.
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February 17, 2010 2:07:02 PM

@Mojito: Glad we could help, have fun overclocking. [:tapko:3]

@werxen: So you’re saying that increasing voltage and heat doesn’t do anything to your cpu. What do you think happens to silicon when it is heated and cooled? From what you are saying your cpu should last forever because heat does no damage to it.
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February 17, 2010 11:45:53 PM

Pro Llama said:
@Mojito: Glad we could help, have fun overclocking. [:tapko:3]

@werxen: So you’re saying that increasing voltage and heat doesn’t do anything to your cpu. What do you think happens to silicon when it is heated and cooled? From what you are saying your cpu should last forever because heat does no damage to it.



Do you have ANY figures??? The only thing I said is overvolting. I am assuming we are past the obvious retard phase where we know running your 45nm processor at 90 degrees Celsius for 2 years is not optimal conditions for anything. Now.... EVEN THAT being said my friend had a Q6600 for 2 years.... TWO YEARS in a CLOSE computer case that was left on 24/7. His computer was ~ 90 degrees Celsius and his ambient was CRAZY high. He still uses that processor today and even overclocked it to 3.3 degrees. Explain that one.

What I am saying is you are looking at a CPU and making a rash decision based on its size and overclocking queens. They are resilient as ALL HELL and do not have a known shelf life. People like you tend to spout out 5-10 years as a magical safe number but that is WRONG because CPUS last LONGER than 5-10 years. Like I said, none of MY cpus have ever died and the only cpus I HAVE heard of dieing has been due to overvolting. Even temperature wise, I still have not heard of a cpu dieing. My old celeron was kept under 5 blankets by me every night because it was too loud and this decreased the noise. It also increased the temperatures of all the parts I am assuming. The only part to ever go out on that rig was my PSU.

Overclocking = safe when done smartly and you cant prove me wrong so stop trying.
February 18, 2010 8:55:54 PM

werxen said:
Horse manure. You back up nothing with 'mights' and 'forgots' and differences between 45 and 65 nm and things that I have already hit on. Irrelevant post with nothing factual yet again. My claim stands strong unless someone can prove otherwise. Overclock away my friend. Your CPU will last as long as you can keep all the other components alive. Do not listen to the rubbish posted by bad overclockers on this forum.


"Your CPU will last as long as you can keep all the other components alive." i don't want to say much about this but you are making a fool by posting so..!! Run a DICE or a LN2 cooled CPU at 6+Ghz and see how much it lasts compared to a 3.8Ghz air cooled CPU. I bet the 6+ will die first because of the voltage and the frequency.

I suggest you keep the rubbish to yourself :ouch:  . I am sorry that i did not check everything in detail to post, if you can you should post what i wrote there and ad what i missed. :sarcastic: 
Check what material the 45nm CPU's use and it's longevity. -"high-k, metal gate processes"
Why does Intel not sell CPU's at 4Ghz? And why do they have a recommended voltage on their site for their CPU's?
And by what standards do you call me a bad overclocker when i learned and overclocked by myself and everyone on toms that posted on my forum said it was good? :D  :bounce: 


February 18, 2010 9:18:11 PM

Mojito_619 by all means overclock as high as you can but i suggest you do not cross the voltage limit specified on Intel's site.
Enjoy.
February 18, 2010 9:30:06 PM

if you are switching and worried about sockets, I'd get the 1156, the 1336 actually won't last any longer than the 1156, the firest generation 6-cores will be on 1336, but the reality is interl has the 15xx something coming around for the future 6 cores. the first gen 6-cores are ultra expensive, quad cores are good priced right now, I'd only get 1336 if I was interested in moving the 6-core proces, but they themselves will be well into the 4 figure price range like we are talking $1999 for the fastest ones.

My answer if you are going to make this switch go AM3 or the 1156, if you are going 1156 get the i7 750, call it day, and then wait out until 6 cores become better priced, they won't be on 1366 when they do in any event. Or get AM3 and a 965.

I wouldn't bother with the 1366 in fact, it's 1 year older , and the 1156 performs better, both of them will have about the same life span probably another year at most, before Intel starts switching to the 15xx boards.
!