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Will this be a good build to overclock 2500k to 5.0GHz?

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May 26, 2012 2:37:32 PM

You probably won't be able to maintain 5ghz stable easily.
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May 26, 2012 2:53:14 PM

Why, and would it go between 4.9GHz and 5.0GHz or something is that what you mean by stable? So do I need a better motherboard or power supply. If so which PSU or motherboard should I buy?

amuffin said:
You probably won't be able to maintain 5ghz stable easily.

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a c 186 à CPUs
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May 26, 2012 3:00:48 PM

What you need is a custom watercooling loop.
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May 26, 2012 3:21:59 PM

^ Affirmative!

asilikus, 5.0ghz 24/7 stable is only possible with really good cooling, meaning high end water cooling, the components you've listed are only part of the conclusion.
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May 26, 2012 4:04:07 PM

I forgot to mention that i will be using a Silver Arrow. Some people said that I can easily hit 5.0 on 2500k with Silver Arrow.
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May 26, 2012 4:35:03 PM

asalikus said:
I forgot to mention that i will be using a Silver Arrow. Some people said that I can easily hit 5.0 on 2500k with Silver Arrow.


Being able to hit 5.0ghz and be stable just long enough to get a CPU-Z 5.0ghz validation is one thing, being 24/7 stable at 5.0ghz without running excessively high load temperatures is another thing altogether.

That's not even taking into consideration that the CPU voltage it takes to run 5.0ghz, is really not the voltage range you should want to run 24/7, as it will shorten the life of your CPU.

You can run your 2500K at 4.5ghz around the 1.325v range, that will allow pretty much anything you could want or need to do with your 2500K and you can comfortably do that with the Silver Arrow.
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a c 283 à CPUs
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May 26, 2012 4:51:27 PM

I'm the one that told him that a Silver Arrow will get to 5Ghz, so I'll take the blame for that one, but it will easily do it for Validation and a few quick bench runs. I never meant 24/7 because I thought that was kind of obvious, but I guess not. Shame on me for that.

Regardless of all of that, you shouldn't ever need a 24/7 5Ghz OC anyway. That's even if the chip will DO 5Ghz stably at a decent voltage (not guaranteed). When/if you ever do need 5Ghz 24/7, it'll be time for an upgrade, but that's FAR in the future.

Your main concern is gaming, it seems, and a 5Ghz OC with a 2500K won't be needed for that for a VERY long time.
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May 26, 2012 5:18:48 PM

Gaming 2500K @5GHz, arguably overkill:
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2012/05/01/intel-...

a) most of the benefit was probably found between 3.4GHz and 4.0GHz, and
b) those with 2560x1440 screens see a shift to the GPU bottleneck meaning that overclocking the CPU might not help, and
c) there's no point in overclocking if your setup runs the game over 60FPS already, it's just generating a lot more heat (especially if you overvolt)

*i5-3570K
It's almost identical to the 2500K but it will run a lot cooler and quieter.

**In the Shogun 2 CPU test the i5-3570K at its stock 3.4GHz is actually better than the 2500K at 5GHz!! (I forget the power difference between a 3570K@3.4GHz and a 2500K@5GHz but it is massive.

Okay-> the above difference on a basic system is 161Watts vs 311Watts. Not all tests will be the same but just something to keep in mind.
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May 26, 2012 5:54:09 PM

Intel Tic Toc:
For those that don't know, Intel has a "tic toc" design cycle. On the "tic" they change the architecture significantly and on the "toc" they concentrate on efficiency (mainly a smaller die size).

That's why the i5-3570K performs similarly to the 2500K but consumes much less lower.
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May 26, 2012 5:59:09 PM

I really don't think Ivy runs cooler than Sandy do some research :) 

photonboy said:
Gaming 2500K @5GHz, arguably overkill:
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2012/05/01/intel-...

a) most of the benefit was probably found between 3.4GHz and 4.0GHz, and
b) those with 2560x1440 screens see a shift to the GPU bottleneck meaning that overclocking the CPU might not help, and
c) there's no point in overclocking if your setup runs the game over 60FPS already, it's just generating a lot more heat (especially if you overvolt)

*i5-3570K
It's almost identical to the 2500K but it will run a lot cooler and quieter.

**In the Shogun 2 CPU test the i5-3570K at its stock 3.4GHz is actually better than the 2500K at 5GHz!! (I forget the power difference between a 3570K@3.4GHz and a 2500K@5GHz but it is massive.

Okay-> the above difference on a basic system is 161Watts vs 311Watts. Not all tests will be the same but just something to keep in mind.

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May 26, 2012 6:02:49 PM

Wow is that's great I think I will buy 3570k if the article is true but what about the other games?

photonboy said:
Gaming 2500K @5GHz, arguably overkill:
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2012/05/01/intel-...

a) most of the benefit was probably found between 3.4GHz and 4.0GHz, and
b) those with 2560x1440 screens see a shift to the GPU bottleneck meaning that overclocking the CPU might not help, and
c) there's no point in overclocking if your setup runs the game over 60FPS already, it's just generating a lot more heat (especially if you overvolt)

*i5-3570K
It's almost identical to the 2500K but it will run a lot cooler and quieter.

**In the Shogun 2 CPU test the i5-3570K at its stock 3.4GHz is actually better than the 2500K at 5GHz!! (I forget the power difference between a 3570K@3.4GHz and a 2500K@5GHz but it is massive.

Okay-> the above difference on a basic system is 161Watts vs 311Watts. Not all tests will be the same but just something to keep in mind.

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May 26, 2012 6:57:32 PM

asalikus said:
I really don't think Ivy runs cooler than Sandy do some research :) 



Ivy runs cooler than Sandy when NOT overclocked. Since only a small percentage of us overclock it's a win for Intel. It also uses less power.
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May 26, 2012 7:34:24 PM

Yes, that is true but it is off topic, we are talking about overclocking.

anort3 said:
Ivy runs cooler than Sandy when NOT overclocked. Since only a small percentage of us overclock it's a win for Intel. It also uses less power.

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May 26, 2012 8:04:17 PM

FYI, when (if) my GTX680 (DirectCU II ASUS) arrives I'll start testing some games.

If I don't require an overclock to get 60FPS with the graphics as far as they'll go (full in most cases) then I won't overclock.

If I had to build a new PC today, I'd be doing this:
- Asus Z77 Ivy Bridge
- Intel i5-3570K
- Corsair H100
- Corsair Carbide 300R case
- 8GB DDR3 1600MHz
- 256GB SSD (SATA3)
- 2TB WD Black
- 750W quality PSU

- GTX680 (I'd water-cool if it wasn't so stupidly expensive, at least so far)
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May 26, 2012 9:30:34 PM

Don't get H100 its more expensive and louder than Silver Arrow they almost keep the same temperatures. Also get 850w power supply in case you might wanna overclock 3570k to 4.5 and add some video cards and overclock them. By the way, if you don't want to overclock yet, you don't have to get Silver Arrow or H100 the CPU comes with stock fan you can buy H100 (or Silver Arrow :D ) in few years when you want to overclock.

photonboy said:
FYI, when (if) my GTX680 (DirectCU II ASUS) arrives I'll start testing some games.

If I don't require an overclock to get 60FPS with the graphics as far as they'll go (full in most cases) then I won't overclock.

If I had to build a new PC today, I'd be doing this:
- Asus Z77 Ivy Bridge
- Intel i5-3570K
- Corsair H100
- Corsair Carbide 300R case
- 8GB DDR3 1600MHz
- 256GB SSD (SATA3)
- 2TB WD Black
- 750W quality PSU

- GTX680 (I'd water-cool if it wasn't so stupidly expensive, at least so far)

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May 26, 2012 9:33:55 PM

Best answer selected by asalikus.
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May 26, 2012 9:36:18 PM

I have one small question, will 3570k run 4.5GHz with Silver Arrow under 80c ?

DJDeCiBeL said:
I'm the one that told him that a Silver Arrow will get to 5Ghz, so I'll take the blame for that one, but it will easily do it for Validation and a few quick bench runs. I never meant 24/7 because I thought that was kind of obvious, but I guess not. Shame on me for that.

Regardless of all of that, you shouldn't ever need a 24/7 5Ghz OC anyway. That's even if the chip will DO 5Ghz stably at a decent voltage (not guaranteed). When/if you ever do need 5Ghz 24/7, it'll be time for an upgrade, but that's FAR in the future.

Your main concern is gaming, it seems, and a 5Ghz OC with a 2500K won't be needed for that for a VERY long time.

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May 27, 2012 2:10:40 AM

asalikus said:
I have one small question, will 3570k run 4.5GHz with Silver Arrow under 80c ?


It SHOULD, yes.
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May 27, 2012 2:19:02 AM

Thanks for your time guys you all have a great day!

DJDeCiBeL said:
It SHOULD, yes.

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a c 283 à CPUs
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May 27, 2012 7:40:51 AM

This is worth a read for you. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ivy-bridge-overcloc...

They experienced thermal throttling @ 4.5 with a 3770K (101C on the hottest core). I'm not exactly sure which cooler they used for the temp tests because it doesn't say, it only says later in the article that they used an Arctic Cooler Freezer 13 for the bench tests, so I assume that's what they used for the temp tests too. The Silver Arrow is better, of course, but it seems that ~75-80C might be the absolute best you'll be able to do @ 4.5 with a 3570K.
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May 27, 2012 8:48:13 AM

Thanks I really enjoyed the article.

DJDeCiBeL said:
This is worth a read for you. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ivy-bridge-overcloc...

They experienced thermal throttling @ 4.5 with a 3770K (101C on the hottest core). I'm not exactly sure which cooler they used for the temp tests because it doesn't say, it only says later in the article that they used an Arctic Cooler Freezer 13 for the bench tests, so I assume that's what they used for the temp tests too. The Silver Arrow is better, of course, but it seems that ~75-80C might be the absolute best you'll be able to do @ 4.5 with a 3570K.

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May 27, 2012 10:16:03 PM

efficiency vs overclocking:

The bottom line is that while that while smaller chips are more EFFICIENT, the trade-off is that the heat isn't as spread out so eventually overclocking becomes difficult.

It really only matters if you can overclock the 2500K high enough that it can process FASTER than the 3570K. The articles I read said that if you stress BOTH chips to their maximum you get roughly the same results.

I'm not really a fan of pushing things to the limit. I basically leave things at stock and overclock only when I need to (for converting video) then set things back again.

At 2560x1440 with a GTX 680 I don't really need to overclock my CPU which is only an i7-860.

*I'd be curious to know if anyone has seen a scenario where a game was below 60FPS and overclocking the CPU raised the FPS higher.

Anyway, this thread appears to be winding down.
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