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2 Wireless Routers

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March 9, 2010 12:17:22 AM

hey guys...first of all id like to say i dunno much about networking so forgive me if im asking a dumb question...

i have a wrt160nv2 router on the second floor of my house...the signal im having on the first floor is 67%...and its really slow for me to play games both on the pc and in the wii... I was thinking about getting another router (buffalo wrt-hp-gn) together with a decent omnidirectional antenna and puttingit on the first floor so id maybe have better signal and also the internet wouldnt suck really bad on the basement...id also connect my ln52a750 tv to the router so i could stream stuff from the laptop to the tv wirelessly.... Would that setup work? What should i do? Which router should be my primary one?
thanks in advance for any help...

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Anonymous
March 9, 2010 8:05:43 AM

Wireless is pretty useless for gaming. You might check out power line network adapters -- fast and reliable BUT they don't always work well (or at all) due to the nature of your home's power wiring. So agree with the retailer to a return/refund if you have problems.
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March 9, 2010 5:43:40 PM

the thing is i dont want any wires around home...has to be wireless and im not playing any fps or anything, just tibia
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March 9, 2010 7:36:31 PM

I assume the Buffalo is not WRT-HP-GN (I can't find it) but WHR-HP-GN.

The Buffalo supports WDS wireless bridging and will minimally require the other side of the wireless bridge also support WDS. But that’s only half the battle. WDS is not wifi certified so implementations vary. It’s very possible (even likely) that Linksys and Buffalo have implemented WDS differently and are therefore incompatible. Even when it does work, it often comes w/ other “hidden” limitations/annoyances (e.g., it might only support WEP). Basically, unless you’re dealing w/ equipment from the same manufacture, WDS wireless bridging it more trouble than it’s worth.

With that in mind, I would only consider the Buffalo if it supported dd-wrt (which according to the dd-wrt database it does) and you used it. NOW you’d get all kinds of cool features. Besides WDS, universal wireless client bridge and universal wireless repeater bridge (universal meaning it will work with ANY wireless router, no dependency on WDS).

If you rather not deal w/ third party firmware, then the best value I see out there right now is the ZyXEL WAP3205.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I've been waiting for Newegg to drop the shipping charge over the past few days (they often do), but so far no luck.

It can function as a WAP (wireless access point), WDS wireless bridge, wireless client bridge, or wireless repeater bridge. Supports wireless N, comes w/ two LAN ports (presumable extendable w/ a switch), even supports multiple SSIDs for separate secured and guest access. A lot of features packed into one device. You can easily pay $70 or more for a simple Linksys wireless client bridge.

As long as you can find an ideal location where you can grab a good wireless signal from the wireless router, while keeping the bridge within range of its own wireless clients, it should help. Just beware that wireless bridging cuts your bandwidth in HALF. That’s because only two wireless stations can be transmitting at any given time on the same freq. So one side of the wireless bridge (wireless bridge to wireless router, or wireless bridge to its wireless clients) is always waiting for the other to complete its transmission before it has a chance to transmit. May or may not be an issue for some ppl, but it’s best to know ahead of time so you don’t pull your hair out wondering what happened, what did I do wrong.


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March 9, 2010 7:43:00 PM

Best answer selected by heaver.
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